iSkills for Medical Sciences and OUH Trust: top tips for designing a conference poster

April 16, 2024, 9 a.m.

Are you planning to present a poster at an upcoming conference, meeting or symposium? This introductory session will provide you with some top tips on how to create a poster presentation which will help you to communicate your research project and data effectively. There will be guidance on formatting, layout, content, use of text, references and images, as well as advice on printing and presenting your poster. This session will also provide help with locating resources such as templates, free-to-use images and poster guidelines. By the end of this online session you will be able to: evaluate the effectiveness of templates, formatting, text and images; and plan, prepare and present your poster. Intended audience: students, staff and researchers from MSD and OUH.

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LEAP conference

April 16, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Call for abstracts Abstracts must directly relate to the themes of LEAP. We are eager for researchers at all levels to participate, especially PhD candidates and postdoctoral researchers. There will be opportunities for both short oral presentations and posters (A1/A0) portrait format). If the total number of abstracts received requesting oral presentations exceeds the space available, we will offer a poster slot as an alternative. There will be prizes for best abstracts (1 x oral; 1 x poster). Please send the following information as a Word document to leap@oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk by 1 March 2024: 1. Name and affiliation (if any) 2. Email 3. Title of paper 4. Brief abstract (300 words) 5. Preference for oral or poster presentation Successful applicants will be notified by 15 March 2024. Hybridity We will be holding oral and poster presentations in person in Oxford. These will not be available online. The plenary sessions will be recorded and available online following the event. Abstracts will be available online.

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Molecular basis of lesion recognition in transcription coupled repair

April 16, 2024, 11 a.m.

Imaging Oligomers of Alpha-Synuclein in Parkinson’s Disease

April 16, 2024, noon

Professor Lee completed his DPhil in Physical Chemistry with Dr. Mark Osborne, before postdoctoral work with both Prof Sir David Klenerman (FRS MedSci) and Prof W.E Moerner (Nobel Prize Chemistry 2014). The Lee lab is based in the Chemical Laboratories at the University of Cambridge, and focusses on the development of new biophysical and single-molecule fluorescence methods to answer fundamental biological problems. Professor Lee is the 2017 recipient of the Marlow Prize in Physical Chemistry from the Royal Society of Chemistry.

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Should I mate or should I go: cyclical control of female rejection behavior

April 16, 2024, noon

Cyclic fluctuations in sex hormone levels intricately coordinate female sexual behavior with reproductive capacity, notably demonstrated in rodents where females only accept copulation attempts during their fertile phase. Outside this window, copulation is not only hindered by low receptivity but also actively rejected. Despite extensive research on female receptivity, rejection behavior has been largely overlooked, often dismissed as a lack of receptivity. Here I will describe a novel circuit dedicated to the cyclical control of rejection behavior situated in the ventromedial hypothalamus. Our findings suggest that a female's sexual response to copulation attempts throughout the reproductive cycle arises from two distinct processes: receptivity and rejection. These processes are governed by separate and spatially segregated hypothalamic populations, whose activity is modulated by the reproductive cycle in a bidirectional and opposing manner.

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Placenta-brain communication in preeclampsia. What we have learnt from preclinical models.

April 16, 2024, 1 p.m.

Bio: I am a medical doctor, and Doctor in Biomedical Sciences, Full professor in the University of Bio Bio (Chillan, Chile). I have been working for many years in the understanding of vascular alterations observed in mother, placenta and offspring exposed to preeclampsia. Currently, we are studying how the impaired function of the placenta may trigger a dysfunction in the brain vasculature, in particular in the formation of brain blood vessels and in the generation of the blood-brain barrier both in the mother and in the offspring. Abstract: The lecture will discuss our recent findings showing disruption of the blood-brain barrier mediated by placental extracellular vesicles in the mother; and the negative impact in brain angiogenesis in offspring from preeclampsia.

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Hybrid Oxford Stroke Seminar - TIA Review

April 16, 2024, 1 p.m.

Precision Proteomics in Human Disease

April 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

“In and Out of Context: Deciphering the Genetic and Genomic Architecture of Type 2 Diabetes”

April 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revolutionized our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of T2D by detecting >600 associated loci, laying the groundwork for precision and personalized medicine. Integrating genomics into healthcare will improve individual risk prediction, tailor prevention programs, and optimize treatments based on a person’s unique genetic profile. Unfortunately, the mechanisms (e.g., target gene, functional variant, and direction of effect) by which the T2D-associated genetic variants influence T2D development are largely unknown, currently limiting the clinical utility of genetics and genomics. This presentation will cover current T2D-variant discovery efforts from the T2DGGI consortium, steady-state and context-specific variant-to-function efforts in pancreatic islets, and examples of how to incorporate genetic risk for T2D into public health and healthcare. Bio : Following a PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Iowa, Cassie Spracklen worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow with Professor Karen Moelke at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In 2019 she was appointed to a tenure track position at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has led several projects within the Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network (AGEN), and is currently co-lead of the fine-mapping working group within the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium.

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PAST Thematic Overview: Modern Black History

April 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

The National Archives collection spans 1,000 years. Throughout this period, there has been a Black presence in Britain, and in the collection. Colonial expansion from the 16th century onwards and global migration have only increased the number and richness of sources for the study of Black history within The National Archives. This half-day online workshop will provide an overview of the most useful sources and methods for research in this area. The records held by The National Archives were created from the perspective of the state and empire – they bear witness to injustice, racism, colonial violence; but also to the long and continued fight for self-determination and racial equality. However, researching Black history within The National Archives is not intuitive – evidence is scattered across the records of dozens of different government departments and described in archaic, oblique and often offensive terms. Recovering the lives, voices and agency of Black people within records created by the state is also challenging. This workshop will provide researchers with the skills to begin tackling these challenges. It will offer: * An overview of the principal sources for Black British history. The workshop will give you an insight into the range of sources available for research in this area and offer advice from our specialists on how to approach the archive thematically. * Case studies on specific topics and records that facilitate the study of Black British history in the archive. We will explore case studies focusing on protest movements, surveillance and the Mangrove Nine (1970), and resistance to nineteenth century colonialism in the British Caribbean. By the end of the workshop, attendees will be equipped with the skills to navigate government archives, and the strategies to locate sources for the study of Black British history. *Programme* * Welcome and introductions * Researching Black British history at The National Archives: an overview * Protest movements and surveillance, the Mangrove Nine, 1970 * Resistance, rebellion, and reprisal in the nineteenth-century British Caribbean

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Webinar 1 | Working-class Professional Service and Administrative Staff in UK Higher Education: Reflections on Reward, Recognition and Responsibility

April 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

The professional experiences of non-academic, professional services and administrative staff have been well documented in recent years. From work around professional identity, contribution to research culture and personal development, the role of non-academic staff in higher education in the UK has focused fundamentally on their human capital and contribution to their working environment. Over the last fifteen years, academic research has documented the personal, experiential side of different stakeholders within university spaces, and particularly how these experiences relate to both protected and non-protected personal characteristics. As yet, the connection between social class and the personal lives and perspectives of staff who occupy non-academic roles has been scarcely made. This presentation draws on a series of interviews conducted as part of research for an EdD Doctor of Education award. The research drew on the experiences of thirteen people working in UK Higher Education who self-defined both as working-class and as either professional services or administrative staff. Exploring career pathways, progression, and opportunities for development it discusses the perspectives and insights from people currently working in UK Higher Education.

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Figuring it out. How patient data can transform diagnosis, treatment and care in the NHS.

April 16, 2024, 6 p.m.

How is your healthcare data being used? It’s a contentious topic, with fears around patient confidentiality, but the patient data held by the NHS is an incredibly rich resource for understanding and fighting some of our deadliest diseases. In this talk, Professor Eva Morris will explain how harnessing data appropriately can inform NHS cancer services – and prevent hundreds of deaths every year. Professor Andrea Cipriani will discuss how clinical data can help deliver personalised care for patients with mental health disorders, improving their outcomes and reducing NHS costs.

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Figuring it out. How patient data can transform diagnosis, treatment and care in the NHS.

April 16, 2024, 6 p.m.

How is your healthcare data being used? It’s a contentious topic, with fears around patient confidentiality, but the patient data held by the NHS is an incredibly rich resource for understanding and fighting some of our deadliest diseases. In this talk, Professor Eva Morris will explain how harnessing data appropriately can inform NHS cancer services – and prevent hundreds of deaths every year. Professor Andrea Cipriani will discuss how clinical data can help deliver personalised care for patients with mental health disorders, improving their outcomes and reducing NHS costs. Eva Morris is Professor of Health Data Epidemiology and Oxford BRC Theme Lead for Translational Data Science. Andrea Cipriani is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the NIHR Oxford Health Clinical Research Facility and Oxford Health BRC Theme Lead for Data Science.

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"Cultural Heritage: Ethics, Politics and Value" Workshop

April 17, 2024, 9 a.m.

April 17-18, 2024, All Souls College, Old Library Cultural heritage has a myriad of interesting and important philosophical dimensions. Its questions pick up on themes about value and the conservation of value; collective memory and our relation to the past; global justice and nationalism; aesthetics and the weight of aesthetic considerations in relation to other ethical questions. As many societies are confronting their histories of war, empire and colonialism, heritage is also emerging as a particularly challenging dimension of social justice. Professor Cécile Fabre and Professor Christine Sypnowich are organising a workshop on some dimensions of the ethics and politics of cultural heritage, around the following topics: a. Heritage and human flourishing b. Heritage and justice c. Heritage and commemoration d. Heritage and the legacy of colonialism e. Heritage and war

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An Introduction to Policy Engagement for Historians

April 17, 2024, 10 a.m.

This talk will be given by Dr Thomas Kelsey, the Humanities & Public Policy Officer for OPEN (the Oxford Policy Engagement Network). It will take place at the Faculty lecture theatre from 10-11.15am on 17 April, and is open to all Faculty members. Tom's talk will cover the following topics: Why do policy engagement? What the policy world looks like How to convert your research into policy outputs Tom will also share his own experiences working in policy engagement as an early career historian; as well as providing information about the resources and training that historians at the Faculty and in the local area can access via the OPEN Network and the new Community History Hub. There will be an opportunity to ask questions and briefly chat with Tom one-to-one on the day. You can find out more about Tom and on OPEN here.

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Protein Research Seminar

April 17, 2024, 10:15 a.m.

Explore the current workflows and look at the primary challenges that researchers face today, our Cytiva experts will highlight the latest innovations in: DNA, RNA & protein Isolation using the Extensive range of magnetic bead, enzymatic and columnbased solutions Single cell solutions for NGS Protein purification to fit your protocol Protein analysis: identification and characterization using our latest imaging solutions and Biacore SPR instruments

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'Visualising the molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic DNA replication'

April 17, 2024, 11 a.m.

The control of inflammatory pain and disease- a new pathway?

April 17, 2024, noon

Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) blockade and that of its receptor are effective in inflammatory arthritis models and rheumatoid arthritis trials. We have discovered a GM-CSF/CCL17 pathway in monocytes/macrophages. The putative role of this pathway in both inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) pain and disease, including in obesity-associated OA, will be discussed. Ideas on the mode of action of CCL17, including its possible involvement in fibrosis/fibroblast biology, will also be presented. In contrast to the well-recognized chemotactic role of CCL17 (e.g. preferential Th2 cell chemotaxis), these data reveal a lymphocyte-independent, non-chemotactic and algesic role of CCL17 in arthritis and possibly other indications, and suggest that it could be a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory pain and disease.

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A Model for Bone as Source of Calcification in Atherosclerotic Heart Disease

April 17, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Toward liveable urban forms: Isobenefit Urbanism

April 17, 2024, 1 p.m.

Urban development combines the forces of dispersal and agglomeration, often facilitated by free market forces, and this results in different patterns and self-organized ways, with both positive and negative outputs. Globally, over 6 billion people will live in cities by 2050, and this would need at least an additional 1.2 million km2 land to be built on. This requires construction at scale that avoids current urban problems such as urban heat island effects, carbon emissions, pollution, congestion, urban sprawl and excessive hard surfacing, while maintaining the physical and mental quality of life. Two basic approaches would be to let market forces freely shape our new urban areas or to impose a strong planning framework. A third way is proposed by Isobenefit urbanism taking advantage of the two basic approaches to urban development. Isobenefit urbanism, proposed since 2013, is a development approach to shaping urban form and functions through a simple code whose implementation results in Isobenefit cities where one can walk to reach most daily destinations, a closest centrality (where theatres, restaurant, schools, offices, promenades, shops…are located) and the closest access to green land regardless where one lives, and regardless the size of the city.

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SchistoTrack Interactive Symposium

April 17, 2024, 1 p.m.

This event will showcase ongoing work in SchistoTrack. Guest speakers Professor David Molyneux, former head of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and Johannes Waltz, Head of the Merck Schistosomiasis Elimination Programme will address the history of neglected tropical disease control, evolution of mass drug administration, and future of treatment and pharmaceutical company involvement. There will also be hands-on demonstrations about SchistoTrack research and community engagement. The symposium will be held in the BDI/OxPop Building seminar rooms from 13:00 – 16:30 on Wednesday 17 April with networking until 17:30. Places are limited.

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"Linking smartphone, wearable and medical device data with routinely collected NHS data for the research community"

April 17, 2024, 2 p.m.

For our next talk in Digital Phenotyping seminar series we will hear from Prof Tim Chico, Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Sheffield; Consultant Cardiologist, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Director, South Yorkshire EPSRC Digital Health Hub, on Wednesday, 17 April, 2:00pm – 3:00pm at the Big Data Institute (BDI). We are delighted to host Prof Chico in what promises to be a great talk! Time: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Date: Wednesday, 17 April 2024 Venue: Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0 Title: Assessing Morphology in all Dimensions: 3D Analysis of Face and Brain Abstract: The BHF Data Science Centre works with a wide range of partners including patients, researchers, clinicians and the NHS to enable data-led research into the causes, prevention and treatment of diseases of the heart and circulation, including heart attacks, stroke and dementia. Our aims are - 1) To be a UK centre of expertise for cardiovascular data science 2) To create strong partnerships to improve health data science infrastructure and reduce barriers to research 3) To involve patients and the public to build trust and ensure that our work meets people’s needs The purpose of the smartphone and wearable theme within the Centre is to support researchers to understand how "smart" data from these devices can be used to develop new approaches to improving prediction, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of cardiovascular diseases. Tim is Associate Director of the British Heart Foundation Data Science Centre, where he leads the Smartphone and Wearable data theme. This theme aims to support the entire research community to find ways to use smartphone, wearable and medical device data to improve health and healthcare. Bio: Tim is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Sheffield and a consultant Cardiologist at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He leads the EPSRC South Yorkshire Digital Health Hub. His career has spanned academia and industry across genetics, vascular biology, drug discovery and health data science. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hybrid Option: Please note that these meetings are closed meetings and only open to members of the University of Oxford to encourage sharing of new and unpublished data. Please respect our speakers and do not share the link with anyone outside of the university. The aim of these seminars is to increase interaction between people working in Phenome across the University so we encourage in person attendance wherever possible. All members of the University are welcome to join, please let reception at BDI know you’re here for the seminar and sign-in. We hope you can join us! There is time for discussion over, tea, coffee and pastries after the talks. Microsoft Teams meeting – Meeting ID: 327 439 986 075 Passcode: gbSYV2 —————————————————————————————————————————— If you wish to know more or receive information related to training and events at BDI, please subscribe by emailing bdi-announce-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. You’ll then receive an email from SYMPA and once you reply you’ll be on the list! Tim will outline the progress and future plans of the theme and is keen to get feedback and advice from the community about how to design the services offered by the Centre to best suit their needs.

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Recollection Lecture: The Gospels Against Slavery: The Jesus tradition in the 19th Century Abolition Debates | Esau McCaulley (Professor of New Testament, Wheaton College).

April 17, 2024, 4 p.m.

NB Recollection Lectures held at 4pm, preceded by tea and coffee in Hood Room from 3:15pm. Week 0 (14-20 April) Wednesday 17th April Recollection Lecture: The Gospels Against Slavery: The Jesus tradition in the 19th Century Abolition Debates. Esau McCaulley (Professor of New Testament, Wheaton College). Everyone knows about the role Paul's Epistles played in the abolitionist/slavery debates of the 19th century. Less attention has been paid to the function of the Jesus tradition in the slavery debates. What might the use of the teachings and life of Jesus by abolitionists reveal about the role of empathy, imagination, and canonical interpretation in theological debate? This lecture explores how retrieving abolitionist exegetical methodology paves the way for a revival of pastoral care and theology in biblical studies.

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The Future of Phenomenology and Qualitative Research

April 17, 2024, 5 p.m.

Phenomenological approaches to qualitative research draw their theory and methods from the philosophical tradition of phenomenology, founded by Edmund Husserl and developed by his students and followers. In this respect, there are clear lines of influence from the classic philosophical works to contemporary empirical qualitative methods. However, few phenomenological qualitative studies have had a reciprocal influence on phenomenology’s philosophical or theoretical debates. This is surprising because other empirical applications of phenomenology, such as phenomenological approaches to experimental design in the cognitive sciences, have productively contributed to philosophical inquiry. In this presentation, I ask why phenomenological qualitative studies have not had a similar influence on the course of philosophical phenomenology. I consider a range of factors, including substantive factors (such as differing aims and levels of interpretive depth) as well as sociological factors (such as differing publication venues and conferences) that may be obstacles to a fruitful back-and-forth between qualitative and philosophical approaches to phenomenology. Following this, I propose an approach to phenomenological qualitative research that may better facilitate critical engagement with philosophical phenomenology, opening new and productive avenues for the future of phenomenology and qualitative research. This talk is part of the Advanced Qualitative Research Methods course on the Evidence-Based Health Care programme.

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Film Screening followed by Q&A with the Director: "Stepping Softly on the Earth", by Marcos Colón

April 17, 2024, 5 p.m.

https://www.lac.ox.ac.uk/event/bsp-film-screening-followed-by-q

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Good Things Come in Small Boxes: The Story of British Tea Chests and Caddies’ by Kate Richenburg

April 17, 2024, 7 p.m.

Tea was introduced to Britain in the 1650s. Its popularity burgeoned over the following two-and-a-half centuries, until it became a defining feature of British culture. Drawing inspiration from China, British craftsmen worked to display their skills on numerous tea-related objects, which ritualised the process of drinking tea. Calling on an array of different materials and techniques, they developed a huge variety of canisters and lockable containers for storing and preserving this precious commodity. Tea chests and caddies were not merely functional items that might lurk at the back of the kitchen – they were intended for display. As the habit of tea drinking filtered down the social scale, caddies were made in larger numbers and in more affordable forms. Join Kate Richenburg as she speaks to us about a great range of decorative antique tea containers from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Alongside a career in publishing, Kate has researched these items for more than 30 years, looking at their making and their wider social context. In doing so, she has visited topics as diverse as eighteenth-century women’s magazines and Napoleonic prisoners-of-war. She has also contributed to the definitive book on the subject, which was published in 2022. If anyone owns an antique tea container and would like to bring it or a photo of it along, Kate will be happy to try to add to the owner’s knowledge of the piece. Georgettes of Oxford Georgettes (GEOrgian & Regency GET-together, Talk and dancE Society) of Oxford is a local community group formed in March 2023 open to all people with an interest in the 18th and early 19th century in and around Oxford; and have also provided 18th Century dancers and extras for Channel 5’s Buckingham Palace with Alexander Armstrong, and have performance on the BBC. Our programme of free talks have covered a variety of subjects including: Romantic painters, data science analysis of Regency novels and historical costuming.

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Spotl:ght: Illuminating Engineering

April 17, 2024, 7 p.m.

Revealing the ground-breaking research that is helping to improve our lives and expand our horizons If you think engineering is all about building bridges and skyscrapers, this show is for you! If you want to know how engineers are helping to tackle climate change and fight infections, this show is for you! If you want to learn how engineering can help us explore space… you get the picture! Hear from some of Oxford’s most innovative and enthusiastic engineers how advances are being made in treating back pain with engineered materials…. how understanding how we use our energy could reduce our carbon footprint… how brain implants work at night…. and how origami will help us explore space! After six short illuminating TEDx style talks, you’ll be ready to astound your friends and family with the answers to these fascinating conundrums: • Origami in orbit: How could foldable structures redefine space exploration? • What secrets are hidden in your energy data (and do they hold the key to a zero carbon lifestyle)? • Can a gas be used to reduce infection? • Can we train a machine to learn like a human? • How does sleep affect brain implants? • How can engineering help treat back pain?

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Oxford Gastro-Oesophageal Cancer Symposium 2024

April 18, 2024, 9 a.m.

Registration is open for OGOS, Oxford Gastro-Oesophageal Cancer Symposium, held by Professor Sheraz Markar (NDS SITU) and Mr Richard Owen (The Ludwig Institute). The conference will be held from 09:00 to 18:00 on Thursday 18 April 2024 at St Anne's College, with optional aperitifs and dinner from 19:30. The meeting is open to anyone who wants to attend.

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Targeting lineage-specific dependencies in paediatric-type diffuse high-grade glioma

April 18, 2024, 11 a.m.

Reporting your statistical analyses: UK EQUATOR Centre Lightning Workshop

April 18, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Join this free one-hour practical, interactive workshop from the UK EQUATOR Centre. In our Lightning Workshops series, our methodology, writing, and communication experts cover all of the essential aspects of writing and publishing your academic research. These sessions are designed for early-career biomedical and clinical researchers. This workshop includes practical tips and tricks for making sure your paper makes a stats reviewer’s heart sing, and not sink! Jie Ma - My research interests are focused on methodological aspects of developing and validating multivariable prediction models. I use applied statistics, systematic review and simulation techniques to investigate how prediction models are usually developed and validated, and how we can improve this methodology for more useful, accurate models. I am also interested in how well prediction model studies are reported in the scientific literature, investigating how well prediction model studies by using tools such as TRIPOD, to give us a baseline assessment of the quality of reporting in this area. This free workshop series is open to all staff and students of the University of Oxford, Oxford Brookes, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, but we do ask you to book a spot. To hear about other EQUATOR courses in Oxford, please join our mailing list by sending a blank email to equator-oxford-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk.

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Getting started with using generative AI with your students: your first steps into ChatGPT and other tools

April 18, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

If you have not used ChatGPT yet, or only taken first steps, this session is for you. It will cover common use cases of generative AI for teaching. It will focus both on strengths and weaknesses of the technology, and it will give you an idea of both what ChatGPT is and what other tools are available. This session will give you a solid foundation for further exploration, and is also a good preparation for the other sessions in the series. It will cover: - What is ChatGPT and generative AI in general - What is the range of use cases for ChatGPT for teaching - What are the strengths and weaknesses of generative AI - What are some other tools to serve as alternatives or complements to ChatGPT - Examples of how others are using generative AI to support their teaching.

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Medical Grand Rounds - Week 2: Rheumatology

April 18, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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Webinar 2 | CGHE Research on Research Project

April 18, 2024, 2 p.m.

The CGHE Research on Research project team will share insights from this four-year study of global dynamics of research. The project adopts a multi-layered approach to understanding research ecosystems in six countries and regions and internationally, considering values and discourses; organisational environments and relationships; evaluation and assessment frameworks; policy and funding; individual careers and perspectives; and meta-scholarship. The presentation will encompass both methodological reflections and developing findings from the extensive empirical work conducted. Methodologically, we will discuss how the project has been able to develop a comparative research framework, alongside identifying some of the challenges involved in conducting large-scale, cross-cultural comparative research. We explore insights from the development of the interview protocols, the construction, pre-pilot and testing of a suite of global survey modules, and bibliometric work on department- and domain-level data. Substantively, and drawing in the analysis of the empirical data, we will offer examples of findings on differing interpretations of research, researchers and good research, research assessment policies and practices across different contexts, and emerging work on diverse research cultures in different parts of the world.

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Motherhood, Multivariate Models and Moët & Chandon - The Nuffield College 2024 Women's Day Event

April 18, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

"Will I be able to have children and have an academic career?” “How can we manage international travel with a baby?” “What do academic women do about childcare?” “Should I have a baby in my PhD or is that just too hard? What about as a soft-funded postdoc?” These are some of the questions that women ask, as we consider and navigate our personal and professional lives. But they are rarely discussed in academia. This informal session is an opportunity for women (and everyone!) to learn and think about parenthood and academia. We will start with a panel discussion with three Nuffield Professorial Fellows, whose six children range from ages 5-18: Professor of Political Theory *Cécile Laborde*, Professor of Economics *Barbara Petrongolo*, and Professor of Child and Family Social Work *Lucie Cluver*. The panel will be moderated by Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow *Dr Molly Fee*, and DPhil student *Dr Sopuruchukwu Obiesie* (both also parents, of four children between four and ten years old). We will be guided by what matters to you! If you would like to submit a question in advance for the panel, you can do so (anonymously) here: https://forms.office.com/e/7nU8E6jY6 We will then have time for informal mingling in the Nuffield College Dining Hall, with champagne (perhaps not quite Moët!) and cake. *If you need to bring a child or two, no problem. Just let us know and, of course, note that they must be supervised!*

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SCNi Prize Medal lecture: 'Multidimensional sleep health: From concept to clinic'

April 18, 2024, 3:30 p.m.

Daniel J. Buysse, MD, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, and Clinical and Translational Science UPMC Endowed Chair in Sleep Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry Biog: Daniel J. Buysse, MD, is Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, and Clinical and Translational Science and the UPMC Endowed Chair in Sleep Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. His research focuses on the insomnia; multidimensional sleep health; behavioral interventions for sleep problems; and interactions between sleep and circadian rhythms. Dr. Buysse has received research funding from the National Institutes for Health (NIMH, NIA, NHLBI, NIDA, NCATS), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Veterans Administration, and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Insitute. He has published over 450 peer-reviewed papers and over 125 invited articles. Dr. Buysse is the Program Director of an NHLBI-funded sleep and circadian science T32 training program. Dr. Buysse is Past President of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and President-Elect of the Sleep Research Society. He has served as Deputy Editor of the journals SLEEP and Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Associate Editor of Behavioral Sleep Medicine, and Chair of the NIH MESH study section.

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I Could Never Go Vegan screening and expert panel discussion

April 18, 2024, 4 p.m.

More information is available on the event webpage: https://www.ndph.ox.ac.uk/events/festival-of-global-health-i-could-never-go-vegan

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OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Two

April 18, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Two: The Double Democratic Bind: Challenges to Enacting Mandates and Combating Misinformation Presenter: Dr Ruth D Carlitz, University of Amsterdam Discussant: Dr Andrea Vaccaro, University of Oxford Corona, the Lockdown, and the Media: A Quantitative Frame Analysis of Media Coverage and Restrictive Policy Responses Presenter: Professor Patrick Bernhagen, University of Stuttgart Discussant: Professor Robin Harding, University of Oxford The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 16:00-17:30 BST.

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Subject Pedagogy Seminar - Mathematical flexibility: A promising focus for research and practice

April 18, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

Mathematical flexibility is increasingly recognized as an important construct of interest for both researchers and practitioners in mathematics education. Flexibility can be characterized as a learner’s willingness to change strategies based on the particular problem-solving conditions or goals. In this talk, I first provide an introduction to flexibility. I then explore different ways that flexibility has been assessed, highlighting successes and challenges in the various forms of assessment. I then present recent empirical research results on flexibility, and I conclude by suggesting some promising areas for future research on flexibility. This seminar is in-person only.

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Virtual Reality Simulation for Medical Educators

April 19, 2024, 8:30 a.m.

Aimed at : Medical educators, simulation practitioners, doctors, nurses, allied health professionals who have an interest in expanding their experiences with technology enhanced learning Why this course: Are you looking to understand how, why and what virtual reality can do to improve learning in your centre? Join the Oxford University Virtual Reality simulation Team in the idyllic setting of Worcester College, Oxford where they will share their experiences over the past 4 year in building VR into medical curricula, working with VR technology and improving the experience for the learner and educator Course outline: Full day of lectures and hands on workshops including individual and team support to explore how to build a bespoke VR based curriculum  Principles and differences of VR simulation  Why, When and How in VR  VR hardware, software and finances: where to start & finish  Interactive workshops with expert faculty

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Oxford Surgical Trials Training Day 2024

April 19, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

This day conference welcomes anyone with an interest in learning more about carrying out a surgical trial. For further details, please visit: https://www.nds.ox.ac.uk/events/oxford-surgical-trials-training-day-2024

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Multi-level Mediation, Negotiation and Diplomacy: Training Workshop

April 19, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

An intensive two-day workshop, 19 and 20 April, in mediation, negotiation and diplomacy, with training in methodology and a practical focus on generating ideas and action proposals for preventing, de-escalating and mitigating tensions between the Western World and China. Training: Participants learn about evidence-based conflict mediation and negotiation tools. They apply them in several exercises and develop related skills. Ideation: Participants use these tools to generate practical ideas and action proposals to address existing tensions between the so-called Western World and China. How could these tensions be reduced and managed and further escalation be avoided? How can we ensure diplomatic stability, open communication, and productive cooperation on key global issues, such as climate change or mutually agreed on principles, while managing differences productively? How can we ensure transparency, predictability and reciprocity in the relations between the West and China, productive cooperation on issues where interests align and a fairer and more disciplined competition on issues where they do not? In this context the participants are invited to look at possible actions by civil society, politicians, businesses, and government institutions. Agenda and “products” Day 1: Participants gain an overview of the practice — and theory — of peace and conflict mediation and negotiation. Several roleplays help them fine-tune key techniques for reaching agreements that work in the real world. Participants explore, for instance, best practices for mediation on the international, national and grassroots level (tracks I, II and III). Day 2: Participants team up and develop innovative “products” aimed at de-escalating and mitigating current tensions in the West-China relationship and preventing a further deterioration. These products may, just to provide some examples, comprise: ● Design of a negotiation or dialogue process: Proposals outlining the goals and procedures for multi-step and multi-party processes ● A mapping of positions, interests and needs of both sides for a particular contentious issue or a policy area where greater cooperation could be possible ● Mediation and negotiation briefings, which explore for example the tangible and intangible interests of countries involved and negotiation checklists for addressing them ● Concepts for dialogue events, which could bring citizens, civil society representatives and government employees from China and the Western World together and foster mutual understanding and dialogue ● Plans for social media campaigns that encourage a public discourse about “common ground” and shared goals. The participants may later offer their products free of charge to members of parliament, think tanks, foundations, media organisations, or UN agencies. Such dissemination of products may happen at the decision of each workgroup and in their own name. The role of the two trainers on Day 2 consists in helping participants refine their own ideas and connect them to the mediation and negotiation concepts explored on Day 1. Who can apply? Students, academics, and practitioners. Besides students, in particular professionals from the following areas are encouraged to apply: government, civil society, the business world, faith-based organisations, NGOs, and the media. Fees and workshop hours: A subsidy from the Oxford Peace Research Trust allows the fee to be just £50 for students, £100 for academic staff, and £300 for practitioners £300 with the voluntary option to help subsidise the student fee by paying an additional £100. The fee includes teas, coffees, and a sandwich lunch, but please note that accommodation is not included. The course organisers are not able to help participants to find accommodation, which is expensive in Oxford and needs to be booked well in advance (there is a reasonably priced EasyHotel on the Banbury Road, a bus route to St John’s). The workshop will run from 9.30 am to 5.30 pm each day, possibly with an additional evening activity. Applications To apply please send a brief statement (up to 200 words) saying why you would like to participate, and a brief CV (including your current course if you are a student) any dietary needs, and contact details (email, phone, and postal address) to the Assistant Organiser, Mallory Matheson, at: mallory.matheson@sant.ox.ac.uk Please apply as soon as possible. We will reply as quickly as possible. Trainers: Martin Albani is the Head of the Peace Mediation and Dialogue Sector in the Foreign Service of the European Union (European External Action Service). He has more than 15 years experience in foreign affairs, crisis response and peacebuilding. In addition to his diplomatic career he regularly teaches and holds workshops on international relations and peacebuilding for universities and international organisations. Dr Valentin Ade teaches negotiation at the University of St. Gallen, for the UN, and for a wide range of businesses, government organisations, and civil society actors. He is founder of The Negotiation Studio (www.negotiationstudio.com). Organisers OxPeace (Oxford Network of Peace Studies) https://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/oxford-network-peace-studies-oxpeace Co-conveners, OxPeace: Dr Liz Carmichael MBE, St John’s College, Oxford; Dr Harry Bregazzi, Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford Assistant Training Workshop Organiser: Mallory Matheson, St Antony’s College, Oxford: Mallory.matheson@sant.ox.ac.uk https://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/oxford-network-peace-studies-oxpeace

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Inside Nature

April 19, 2024, 10 a.m.

I will talk about what we as editors look for in a manuscript and navigating the editorial and peer review process. I will leave plenty of time for questions in a Q&A.

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“Inequalities in mental health: economic and policy perspectives” OMHEP workshop

April 19, 2024, 1 p.m.

Following up on the success of the Oxford Mental Health Economics & Policy (OMHEP) workshop last September, we are delighted to invite you to the workshop titled “Inequalities in mental health: economic and policy perspectives” from 13:00 to 16.30 on Friday 19th April at the Abraham Lecture Theatre in Green Templeton College, Oxford. This workshop will bring together academics, clinicians, commissioners, charities, and policy makers to share their views and discuss about inequalities in mental health and how they can be reduced. The workshop is convened by Assoc. Prof. Apostolos Tsiachristas and Prof. Belinda Lennox and is supported by Oxford’s Department of Psychiatry, Green Templeton College, and the local NIHR-Applied Research Collaboration. It will include presentations from key speakers but attendance and participation in the discussion is open to students, academics, NHS workers, charity workers, patients and public. Programme 13.00 – 13.10 Welcome and Opening - Sir Michael Dixon, Principal Green Templeton College - Prof. Belinda Lennox, Head of Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford 13.10-.14.00 Describing and measuring mental health inequality (Moderator: B. Lennox) - Dr. Geraldine Strathdee, Independent Chair of rapid review into data on mental inpatient settings - Dr. Ana Todoric, Research Scientist, Akrivia Health 14.00-14.15 break 14.15-15.15 The scale and impact of inequality in mental health (Moderator: A. Tsiachristas) - Husnara Malik, National Lead for Mental Health Inequalities NHSE - Myorong Yang, Health economist, HERC, University of Oxford - Andy Bell – CEO of Centre for Mental Health 15.15-15.30 break 15.30-16.30 Addressing inequalities in mental health (Moderator: B. Lennox) - Dr. Nick Broughton, CEO Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire West Integrated Care System (BOB-ICS) - Dr. Waheed Arian, founder of Arian Teleheal, NHS doctor, author, advisor to UN - Prof. Apostolos Tsiachristas, Health Economist, University of Oxford 16.30-17.30 Drinks and canapes reception

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CVs for non-academic roles

April 19, 2024, 1 p.m.

Are you wanting to apply for job roles beyond academia? Creating a strong CV is vital to unlocking the next stage of the job application process. However, there can be many differences in the format and content of a CV focused towards a role beyond academia compared to one for university research positions. This online session will outline the key building blocks of a CV structured for careers outside of academia research, share examples to help with formatting and language, and briefly guide on how best translate your research skills and experience. This session will focus on application materials for roles beyond academia only. Workshop objectives: *Provide an overview of the variation in CV formats for job roles beyond academia *Provide tips for visually formatting your CV to best communicate your experience *Share methods for identifying the language and skills employers wants to see This event is open to Research staff and DPhil students.

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Medical Sciences Education Forum: AI in practice

April 19, 2024, 1 p.m.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a rapidly evolving technology with a large potential impact on education. In particular, generative AI in the form of Large Language Models (LLMs), can rapidly generate high quality text, computer code and graphics in response to prompts. The university has adopted the Russell Group principles (https://academic.admin.ox.ac.uk/ai-in-teaching-and-assessment) on the use of generative AI in education and the CTL have generated useful resources and guidance (https://www.ctl.ox.ac.uk/ai-tools-in-teaching ). However, the ramifications of AI for learning and assessment can be overwhelming to process and lack of time is a barrier for academics to work out how to become AI literate themselves and how to support students. This forum will be an opportunity to share practical experiences of AI in education, and to work out, together, how to become AI literate: - How do we support students to use AI appropriately? - How do we responsibly use AI ourselves? Please do let us know if you have any experience of using AI in your teaching, which you would be prepared to share in a short, informal talk.

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Hyperactive Protein Responses and Functional Residuomics of Cilia

April 19, 2024, 2 p.m.

I address how a cell governs hyperactive ciliary proteins. We found that RNA editing restricts hyperactive ciliary kinases by editing the kinase’s own message RNAs, reducing kinase translation (Li et al., Science, 2021). We find that sensory neurons dispose of a hyperactive intraflagellar transport (IFT) kinesin into the surrounding glia for clearance. We show that the kinesin conformation and activity are responsible for its fate. These results indicate that a living cell responds to hyperactive proteins through multiple unexpected pathways and that changing distinct residues trigger different cellular responses. We are using chemical mutagenesis and bioinformatics to systematically define functional residues essential for cilium assembly and performance. Guangshuo Ou is a Professor and the Associate Dean at the School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The Ou laboratory studies the molecular and cellular regulations of neural development and has recently focused on how sensory neurons build up olfactory cilia. Guangshuo received his Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology under the guidance of Dr. Jon Scholey at the University of California, Davis (2006). Afterward, Guangshuo was a Damon Runyon Postdoctoral Fellow with Dr. Ron Vale at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF, 2007~2011). Guangshuo’s graduate and postdoctoral work were published in journals such as Nature and Science. Guangshuo started his first independent position as an awardee of the Junior 1000 Talents Program at the Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Science, in February 2011. The Ou lab was relocated to Tsinghua University in August 2013. The research findings from my group have been published in Science, Nature Biotechnology, EMBO Journal, Developmental Cell, Journal of Cell Biology, Current Biology, PNAS, and other journals. The Chinese National Science Foundation awarded Guangshuo the National Outstanding Young Scholarship in 2016. Guangshuo received the Newton Advanced Fellowship from the Royal Society and started his collaboration with Prof. Jordan Raff since 2015.

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Climate Changemaker Playbook Launch

April 19, 2024, 3:30 p.m.

In this seminar, co-authors Marya Besharov and Pip Wheaton willl come together with Sue Riddlestone OBE to launch the joint Skoll Centre and Ashoka Climate Changemaker Playbook, a collection of strategies and tactics for how to unlock our collective power to take climate action. With a foreword by Christiana Figueres and case studies of five leading climate changemakers from Ashoka's network, this playbook is for anyone wondering how to take action, and and how to encourage those around you to do the same.

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Conference: Buddhism and Food Ethics

April 20, 2024, 9 a.m.

The University of Oxford and Yin-Cheng Buddhist Studies Network are pleased to announce a one-day conference on Buddhism and Food Ethics. Food Ethics lie at the heart of many aspects of Buddhist practice. Traditionally consideration and debate concerning food ethics were played out in relation to the nature of Buddhist renunciation and identity, almsgiving (dāna) and merit making, serving of seniors, ancestors, deities and Buddhas, and so forth. In recent decades, food ethics has been transformed by concerns about climate change, the plastic catastrophe, waste management, modern-day slavery, endangered species, animal welfare, agri-business, the health impact of food and food security. Call for papers is open with a deadline of 18:00 on 1 March. Please send submissions to "$":mailto:pyi.kyaw@ames.ox.ac.uk See more here: https://ukabs.org.uk/buddhism-and-food-ethics/ The conference is kindly funded by the Yin-Cheng Network for Buddhist Studies.

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Prayer Book and Revolution

April 20, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

The Scottish Prayer Book of 1637 was one of the most controversial works printed in early Stuart Britain - when it was first used in Edinburgh's St Giles Cathedral it famously provoked a riot. Soon, the religious and political tensions between Charles and his subjects led to civil war across the three Stuart kingdoms. In Christ Church we have a copy of the 1632 Prayer Book with annotations from Archbishop William Laud and King Charles (MS 540); this texts sheds important new light on the development of Caroline religious policies and the relationship between the Stuart Churches. In this colloquium, leading historians will discuss the significance of Christ Church MS 540, showing its place in the wider story of the Civil Wars and the development of a distinctive religious identity that would become Anglicanism. It will mark the return of MS 540 from conservation which has been generously supported by the National Manuscripts Conservation Trust. Speakers include Richard Cust (University of Birmingham), Ken Fincham (University of Kent), Sarah Mortimer (Christ Church, Oxford), and William White (University of Hertfordshire). There will be a £20 registration fee (free for students/unwaged), which will include refreshments (not including lunch) and the drinks reception after Evensong. The conference will be held in Christ Church Upper Library*, St Aldates, Oxford OX1 1DP. * We regret that access to the Upper Library is by a large spiral staircase only, and may cause difficulty for anyone with limited mobility.

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iSkills for Medical Sciences and OUH Trust: top tips for designing a conference poster

April 22, 2024, 11 a.m.

Are you planning to present a poster at an upcoming conference, meeting or symposium? This introductory session will provide you with some top tips on how to create a poster presentation which will help you to communicate your research project and data effectively. There will be guidance on formatting, layout, content, use of text, references and images, as well as advice on printing and presenting your poster. This session will also provide help with locating resources such as templates, free-to-use images and poster guidelines. By the end of this online session you will be able to: evaluate the effectiveness of templates, formatting, text and images; and plan, prepare and present your poster. Intended audience: students, staff and researchers from MSD and OUH.

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Cancer related research in the Million Women Study: key findings

April 22, 2024, noon

Gillian Reeves is Professor of Statistical Epidemiology and Director of the Cancer Epidemiology Unit in the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford. She trained originally as a statistician and completed a PhD in statistics at Imperial College before joining the Cancer Epidemiology Unit in Oxford as a medical statistician. In the early 1990s, she was involved in setting up the Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer, a large international collaboration of over 100 epidemiological studies, which has generated key findings on the role of oral contraceptives and HRT in breast cancer incidence, and influenced clinical practice. She is a PI for the Million Women Study, a very large UK cohort study of women’s health, which provides the basis for much of her epidemiological research. Her main research interests are the prevention and early detection of breast and other cancers.

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Lessons into lupus pathogenesis from inborn errors of immunity

April 22, 2024, noon

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease and presents a major clinical unmet need. It is characterised by significant clinical and transcriptomic heterogeneity. Lupus begins in early adulthood with 90% of affected individuals being women; it is chronic and incurable. It has been postulated that what we call SLE may in fact consist of several diseases each brought about by a different pathogenic pathway. Current approaches to treatment including the use of “precision therapies” are not administered in a personalised manner, because we do not fully understand the underlying pathogenic mechanism. In the last two decades, important lessons have been learnt from inborn errors of immunity caused by damaging germline variants in single genes that present clinically as increased susceptibility to infections. We have applied a similar approach to systemic autoimmunity and searched for novel – including de novo – and ultrarare coding variants in individuals suffering from severe SLE. This has led to the discovery of multiple disease-causing gene variants in genes not previously known to cause human lupus, that have been validated through their introduction in mice. The novel bespoke mouse models are revealing novel insights into pathogenic pathways and illuminating targeted therapies. Intriguingly, most pathways appear to converge in a central one that requires TLR7-MyD88 signaling, which suggests that lupus may in fact be one disease driven by increased nucleic acid signaling, with protean clinical manifestations.

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Acute Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy – past, present and the future

April 22, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Socio-economic status, gender and achievement: The mediating role of expectancy and subjective task value

April 22, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Expectancy-Value Theory predicts that expectancy of success and subjective task value (STV) underlie differences in motivation and achievement. This study investigated how gender and SES related to achievement mediated by expectancy of success, STV, and their interaction. The sample consisted of 396 participants in their final year of upper secondary education. Self-report measures were completed of expectancy, STV, gender and socio-economic indicators. These were linked to exit examination grades (A Levels). Only parental education was directly related to achievement however gender and SES were indirectly linked to student grades through expectancy, STV, and the expectancy-STV interaction. Males, students with a higher level of parental education, and students from households with a higher number of possessions, all performed better in their examination due to higher expectations; higher STV amplified these relations. Gender and SES differences in achievement can be partly explained by psychological factors, namely students’ expectations of success and STV. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87029146587?pwd=cFBUMkJJOXRGWXI5SDhRY1phN21rdz09

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Title TBC

April 22, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Seminar 1 of Trinity Term's Sociology Seminar Series Please join either in person or online. For in-person attendees, the talk will be preceded by a light lunch at 12.15pm. Please email comms@sociology.ox.ac.uk with any questions or to receive the Microsoft Teams link.

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"Controlling Aurora-A kinase functions in mitosis and cancer"

April 22, 2024, 1 p.m.

Transmission, asymptomatic shedding, and airborne spread of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci) in schoolchildren

April 22, 2024, 1 p.m.

Shiranee is Professor of Infectious Diseases at Imperial College London and a Clinical Infectious Diseases consultant at Hammersmith and St Mary’s Hospitals. She leads the Gram Positive Pathogenesis research group within the Department of Infectious Disease, and is clinical director of Imperial’s Centre for Bacteriology Resistance Biology. Her group works on the mechanisms that allow Streptococcus pyogenes to cause extreme clinical phenotypes in individuals and populations. Transmission is a new research area, sparked by a recognition of the intensity of spread that can occur.

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Lessons from responding to pandemics and studying bat viruses/immunity

April 22, 2024, 2 p.m.

In the three decades or so, we have had multiple zoonotic diseases outbreaks caused by bat-borne viruses or viruses with ancestral lineages in bats: Hendra in Australia (first detected in 1994), Nipah in Malaysia/Singapore (1998/9), SARS outbreak (2002/3), MERS outbreak (2012), large scale Ebola virus outbreak (2014) and SARS-CoV-2 (2019/20). Bats are now known as one of, if not, the most important reservoirs of different virus families, yet bats carry these viruses in a largely asymptomatic manner. Bats are also the longest living mamma relative to body size. In this presentation, I will discuss the lessons learnt from studying bat-borne emerging zoonotic viruses and bat immunology in the context of better preparing for future pandemics and translating “bat knowledge” into improving human health in general.

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Psilocybin treatment of tobacco addiction

April 22, 2024, 2 p.m.

Inaugural Cressida Jervis Read Seminar - “Archives of Loss and Wonder”: Writing a History of Fossil Heritage in South Asia

April 22, 2024, 4 p.m.

Fossils from the Indian subcontinent are a common sight in natural history museums around the world, which testifies to their importance as objects of education and scientific research. The collections at the Natural History Museum in London and the Yale Peabody Museum in New Haven are among the most sizeable, but smaller ones exist in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, the Palaeontological Collection at the University of Tübingen, Manchester Museum, and Tohoku University’s Museum of Natural History. These assemblages have different genealogies that are not always easy to document. Indeed, it is ironic that the specimens themselves, though often difficult to transport, seem to have travelled more easily than information about their complicated histories. Drawing on examples from such material archives of Earth science, the talk considers how South Asian fossil heritage has provided a scientific lens through which to investigate the deep past of the planet and how it has been used to weave that past into the politics of the present and the making of the future. Following Laura Ogden, I argue that such collections archive layered forms of loss, but also wonder, and consider what this teaches us in times of ecological precarity. This talk will be followed by a drinks reception in the Common Room.

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SIR WILFRID LE GROS CLARK PRIZE LECTURE: Cardiovascular Ageing: Unraveling the Interplay of Vessels, Nerves, and Inflammation

April 22, 2024, 4 p.m.

Aging poses a significant risk to cardiovascular health and leads to an increase in diastolic and systolic impairment, endothelial cell dysfunction, hypertrophy, fibrosis, and electrophysiological alterations, increasing susceptibility to arrhythmic events in the elderly. The mechanisms driving age-associated cardiovascular changes are not fully understood. Our preliminary findings indicate a decline in axon density within the aging heart. Recognizing the pivotal role of neuro-vascular interactions in maintaining tissue homeostasis, we hypothesize that a compromised neuro-vascular interface contributes to age-related cardiac pathologies. Our study showed a significant reduction of nerve density in the aging heart. We further explored the mechanisms and identified an induction of the repulsive Semaphorin 3a (SEMA3A) in senescent endothelial cells. Eliminating senescent cells by senolytics rescued the age-associated decline in nerve density, and ameliorated immune cell invasion and age-associated alterations in cardiac function. In summary, our comprehensive investigation unraveal the previously unexplored dynamics of neuro-vascular interactions in the aging heart. We suggest that restoring or preserving a functional cross-talk between neurons and the vasculature holds promise for promoting healthy cardiac aging. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Stefanie Dimmeler is born on 18.07.1967 in Ravensburg, Germany. Dr. Dimmeler received her undergraduate, graduate, and Ph.D. degree from the University of Konstanz in Konstanz (Germany) and then completed a fellowship in Experimental Surgery at the University of Cologne and in Molecular Cardiology at the University of Frankfurt (Germany). She is Professor of Experimental Medicine (since 2001) and Director of the Institute of Cardiovascular Regeneration, Center for Molecular Medicine at the University of Frankfurt since 2008. In the last years, she has been invited as a speaker in more than 300 national and international meetings and seminars and has presented various keynote lectures. She also received several awards and is among the top 3 female Scientists in Germany. She is also spokesperson of the “Cardiopulmonary Institute” (CPI) which is funded by the Excellence Strategy Program of the German Research Foundation and spokesperson of the German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). She also received three Advanced Investigator Grants by the European Research Community (ERC). Her group elucidates the basic mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease and vessel growth with the aim to develop new cellular and pharmacological therapies for improving the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Ongoing research focuses on epigenetic mechanisms that control cardiovascular repair, specifically non-coding RNAs.

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Title TBC

April 22, 2024, 4:05 p.m.

Courtly Encounters/Courtly Mediators: Transcultural Objects as Diplomatic Gifts at the Court of Naples

April 22, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

Sung-Yoon Lee: North Korean leadership and the situation in the DPRK

April 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

Join the Oxford International Relations Society and Dr Sung-Yoon Lee for a discussion on Kim Yo Jong, de-facto deputy to her brother, Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un, and the most powerful woman in North Korea. When: 22 April 2024, 5-6:30 pm. Where: Sir Michael Dummett Lecture Theatre, Christ Church. How did Kim Yo Jong, who has threatened to nuke South Korea, become the ruthless chief propagandist, internal administrator and foreign policymaker for her brother's totalitarian regime? Dr Lee's new book, The Sister, uncovers the truth about Kim Yo Jong, her close bond with Kim Jong Un and the lessons in manipulation they learned from their father. Lee also examines the iron grip the Kim dynasty has on their country, the grotesque deaths of family members deemed disloyal, and the signs that Kim Yo Jong has been positioned as her brother's successor should he die while his own children are young. Sung-Yoon Lee is a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a specialist on North Korea. He was previously the Kim Koo-Korea Foundation Professor in Korean Studies and Assistant Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. Dr Lee has advised senior-most officials in the US government and is an outspoken proponent of several policies aimed at changing the North Korean regime towards a path of denuclearization and improvement of human rights, while keeping the peace and stability in Northeast Asia. The event will be moderated by Dr Edward Howell, Korea Foundation Fellow with the Asia-Pacific Programme at Chatham House and Lecturer in Politics at Christ Church. Dr Howell is the author of North Korea and the Global Nuclear Order and a senior member of the Oxford IR Society. ~ Oxford International Relations Society

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The Quest for God

April 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

Karen Armstrong, one of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, is a preeminent scholar and author celebrated for her profound explorations into faith and religious history. Her extensive body of work, which includes the groundbreaking "A History of God" and the insightful "Muhammad: A Prophet For Our Time," showcases her ability to masterfully navigate the complexities of belief systems across eras. Armstrong brings to light the intricate interplay between faith and the human condition, offering unparalleled insights into the ways in which spirituality shapes our understanding of the world.

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Performance as Infrastructure: Melodrama and the 1889 London Dock Strike

April 22, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

The swan song of quantitative eminence: embracing qualitative research in evidence based health care

April 22, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Qualitative research can be used to provide rich, nuanced understandings of complex phenomena in health care. Using a range of naturalistic methods, qualitative researchers aim to uncover and explore factors on individual, group and systemic levels to answer how, what and why questions. Qualitative research can provide insight to improve patient care and outcomes, understand staff experience and to inform policy. It has often been unfairly criticised and marginalised against what are considered ‘gold standard’ quantitative methods. This has led to a lack of understanding about how it can, and should, be used in evidence based health care. This talk will dispel common myths associated with qualitative research as well as demonstrating its value.

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The role of psychiatry in the care of older acute medical inpatients: findings of The Home Study.

April 23, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Psychiatric and psychosocial problems, including cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety and functional dependency, are highly prevalent in older acute medical inpatients. These problems are critical factors in prolonged hospital stays, which worsen patient's mental and physical outcomes and reduce bed availability. Could adding psychiatry in a proactive and integrated way help ward teams to provide better care for older inpatients and reduce the time they spend in hospital? The HOME Study, probably the largest randomised trial ever done in psychiatry aimed to answer these questions. We will present its findings and discuss their implications. https://zoom.us/j/95199401096?pwd=ancrZ0U1b0RNVmlKL0tQdTQ5SzhLUT09 Meeting ID: 951 9940 1096 Passcode: 937384

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Digital Scholarship coffee morning

April 23, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Join us for a digital scholarship coffee gathering – tea and coffee will be provided. There will be a lightning talk from a researcher in digital scholarship on their work, whether it’s a new project, a tool or something they want to showcase. These are a new type of event for us, so if you’d like to attend, be involved in a future session, or find out more please email digitalscholarship@humanities.ox.ac.uk These will be held in the Visiting Scholars Centre, so to attend you’ll need to bring your Bodleian Card and to leave your bags in the lockers – this event is only open to University staff and students.

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Title TBC

April 23, 2024, 11 a.m.

Turning up the Heat on Cancer

April 23, 2024, 11 a.m.

Lysosomal Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence in Youth and With Age

April 23, 2024, 11 a.m.

PIEZO1 force sensor in cardiovascular health and its potential as a drug target

April 23, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'Invisible Children: The importance of identification and support for children with a parent in prison'

April 23, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

Invisible Children: The importance of identification and support for children with a parent in prison - Film Screening and Q&A with Children Heard and Seen Charity. Sarah Burrows, Founder and CEO of Oxford-based charity Chlidren Heard and Seen, along with colleauges James Ottley (Project Manager) and & Lilia Brustad (Research and Funding Officer), will present a 12 minute film to demonstrate the importance of identification and support for children with a parent in prison. View the short trailer online: https://youtu.be/-k4kXnksNro?si=JVqsl74qf4bSBK7V This will be followed by a Q&A. This is a hyrbid event, held in the Department of Psychiatry's Seminar Room and online (Zoom). Please email shona.oleary@psych.ox.ac.uk to request the Zoom link.

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Astor Visiting Fellow Lecture: Firms, Production Networks, and Trade

April 23, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Andrew Bernard has been on the faculty at Tuck since 1999 and in 2017 was named the Kadas T’90 Distinguished Professor. Bernard is currently an Astor Visiting Fellow in the Department of Economics at the University of Oxford. Professor Bernard is an expert in international trade and investment and specializes in firm responses to globalization. In recent papers, he has documented the emergence of factory-less goods producers in the US, revisited traditional views of deindustrialization and explored the dynamics of new exporters and the role of intermediaries in global trade. His current research focuses on the evolution of global (and domestic) production networks and the consequences for firm performance.

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Using mathematics to understand collective cell behaviours

April 23, 2024, 1 p.m.

CSAE Research Workshop Week 1

April 23, 2024, 1 p.m.

Unpacking Moving

April 23, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Some new insights into the psychology of individuals and large groups in a world of changing conflicts

April 23, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

The use of overwhelming force no longer guarantees victory in war. Under what conditions do supposedly weaker conflict actors ‘outpower’ stronger actors? Lord Alderdice will argue that those most willing to sustain extreme conflict have been ‘devoted actors’ driven by non-negotiable ‘sacred values’. Bringing into dialogue insights from large group psychology, neuroscience, and epigenetics with those of political science, he will describe two factors one biological, and the other from complex large group psychology, that can help explain these apparently non-rational phenomena. John, Lord Alderdice has an academic and professional background in medicine, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis. He was a consultant psychiatrist and Senior Lecturer at The Queen’s University of Belfast where he established the Centre for Psychotherapy with various degree courses, research work and clinical services. He also devoted himself to understanding and addressing religious fundamentalism and long-standing violent political conflict, initially in Ireland, and then in various other parts of the world. This commitment took him into politics, and he was elected Leader of Northern Ireland’s Alliance Party from 1987 to 1998, playing a significant role in the negotiation of the 1998 Belfast/Good Friday Agreement. When the new Northern Ireland Assembly was elected, he became its first Speaker. In 2004 he retired from the Assembly on being appointed by the British and Irish Governments as one of the four members of the Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC), appointed to close down the operations of the paramilitary organizations (2003-2011) and he continued with this work on security issues when he and two colleagues were commissioned by the new Northern Ireland Government to produce a report advising them on strategy for disbanding the remaining paramilitary groups (2016). Having been appointed to House of Lords in 1996 he was elected Convenor of the Liberal Democrats for the first four years of the Liberal/Conservative Coalition Government from 2010 to 2014. His international interests had previously led to his election as President of Liberal International, the global network of some 100 liberal political parties and organizations. He served from 2005 to 2009 and remains an active Presidente D’Honneur. He recently was elected to the House of Lords Select Committee on International Relations and Defence. He is the founding Director of the Conference on the Resolution of Intractable Conflict, based in Oxford and with colleagues in Belfast he also established the Centre for Democracy and Peace Building which continues work on the implementation of the principles of the Good Friday Agreement and takes the lessons of the Irish Peace Process to other communities in conflict. More recently he set up The Concord Foundation with a wider remit in understanding and addressing the nature of violent political conflict and its resolution. Lord Alderdice’s work has been recognized throughout the world with many fellowships, visiting professorships, honorary doctorates, and international awards. Lord Alderdice is currently the Executive Chairman of CCW.

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Networked Bollywood: How Star Power Globalized Hindi Cinema

April 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

Networked Bollywood provides interdisciplinary analysis of the role of the stars in the transformation of Hindi cinema into a global entertainment industry. The first Indian film was made in 1913. However, filmmaking was recognized as an industry almost a hundred years later. Yet, Indian films have been circulating globally since their inception. This book unearths this oft-elided history of Bollywood's globalization through multilingual, transnational research and discursive cultural analysis. The author illustrates how over the decades, a handful of primarily male megastars, as the heads of the industry's most prominent productions and corporations, combined overwhelming charismatic affect with unparalleled business influence. Through their "star switching power," theorized here as a deeply gendered phenomenon and manifesting broader social inequalities, India's most prominent stars instigated new flows of cinema, industrial collaborations, structured distinctive business models, influenced state policy and diplomatic exchange, thereby defining the future of Bollywood's globalization. Dr. Swapnil Rai is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Media at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. As an interdisciplinary scholar, she works at the intersection of media studies, critical cultural communication, women's and gender studies, and industry studies. Focusing on the global south, she investigates how transnational networked cultures intersect with the media industries and with questions of policy, geopolitics, and audiences.

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SeedWISE - Cultivating Women's Excellence in STEM

April 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

SeedWISE is a ground-breaking enterprise program meticulously crafted to cater to the unique needs of women* DPhil students in STEM fields. We believe that your aspirations deserve the utmost nurturing and support, and that's exactly what we're here to provide. Our 6-week program is designed with your busy research schedule in mind, offering a dynamic blend of online and in-person learning opportunities. This flexibility ensures that you can seamlessly integrate SeedWISE into your academic life. *We also welcome non-binary people who are comfortable in a space that will discuss women focused experiences.

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Webinar 3 | Research Assessment and Impact

April 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

Sanctuary Policies for Irregular Migrants in European Cities: Dismantling the Fortress from the Ground Up?

April 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

Amid the growing popularity of far-right politics and restrictive border policies, many European cities have enacted “sanctuary policies” (SPs) to support the increasing number of residents with irregular migration status. Through SPs, local governments disrupt the monopoly of nation-states over immigration and citizenship, challenging conventional understandings of governance in liberal democracies. The core question of Sanctuary Policies for Irregular Migrants in European Cities (SPIMEC) is to explain the varieties, drivers, and impacts of SPs in Europe. Bridging insights from multiple disciplines, SPIMEC theorises that local governments are situated at the crossroads of political mobilisation from the bottom up and institutional restrictions from the top down. These different, often contradictory forces shape the opportunities and constraints for SPs. Drawing on fieldwork in four cities (Barcelona, London, Milan, and Rotterdam), SPIMEC offers a path-breaking contribution to governance theories and viable policy solutions to cities seeking to advance immigrant rights. Zoom link: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEld--urTkqG9H-Vetk0H1Ijg06AXPA7KsH

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Moving towards individualized epilepsy treatment: possibilities in whole brain modelling

April 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

Chokepoints: Temporalities of Navigation in the Red Sea

April 23, 2024, 3 p.m.

Adapted large language models can outperform medical experts in clinical text summarization

April 23, 2024, 3 p.m.

Analyzing vast textual data and summarizing key information from electronic health records imposes a substantial burden on how clinicians allocate their time. Although large language models (LLMs) have shown promise in natural language processing (NLP) tasks, their effectiveness on a diverse range of clinical summarization tasks remains unproven. Here we applied adaptation methods to eight LLMs, spanning four distinct clinical summarization tasks: radiology reports, patient questions, progress notes and doctor–patient dialogue. Quantitative assessments with syntactic, semantic and conceptual NLP metrics reveal trade-offs between models and adaptation methods. A clinical reader study with 10 physicians evaluated summary completeness, correctness and conciseness; in most cases, summaries from our best-adapted LLMs were deemed either equivalent (45%) or superior (36%) compared with summaries from medical experts. The ensuing safety analysis highlights challenges faced by both LLMs and medical experts, as we connect errors to potential medical harm and categorize types of fabricated information. Our research provides evidence of LLMs outperforming medical experts in clinical text summarization across multiple tasks. This suggests that integrating LLMs into clinical workflows could alleviate documentation burden, allowing clinicians to focus more on patient care.

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Title TBC

April 23, 2024, 4 p.m.

Cell type evolution in the primate brain

April 23, 2024, 4 p.m.

Primate brains vary in size and organization, but the genetic, developmental, and cellular basis for these differences has been difficult to study due to limited experimental models. In this talk, I will describe three complementary approaches for studying human-specific gene network evolution in conserved cell types using stem cell derived models and genome engineering. Ultimately, functional studies in great ape stem cell models, complemented by comparisons and validation in available primary tissue, could be applied beyond studies of progenitor cell evolution to decode the genetic and developmental origin of recent changes in cellular organization, connectivity patterns, myelination, and synaptic activity that have been implicated in human cognition.

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'From seahorse sex to global policy change'

April 23, 2024, 4 p.m.

Dr Vincent will tell a story about using imperfect knowledge to help improve the status of marine life. Her tale starts with trying to understand sex roles in seahorses. It then leads to the creation of 35 marine protected areas and the first global export regulations for marine fishes. And now the Project Seahorse team is trying to end bottom trawling, a very common and devastating form of fishing. They dance on the interface between knowledge creation and knowledge application, taking the view that “we know enough”, and quickly deploying whatever they learn to effect measurable change. Amanda Vincent is a Professor in the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries at the University of British Columbia, Canada. She is also Director of Project Seahorse, a team that works globally to advance marine conservation, and she leads IUCN and CITES work on marine species. Amanda won the 2021 Indianapolis Prize, the world’s top award for animal conservation, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. She is proud of being the first winner of the Whitley Award. Amanda earned her PhD at the University of Cambridge and was a Research Fellow at Somerville College and the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford before becoming a faculty member at McGill University, Canada. She yearns to spend more time in the ocean.

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Critiquing Roman Law: Oroonoko, Two Treatises, and the Shifting Justifications of Slavery

April 23, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Oxford Energy Seminar Series – Week 1 TT24: Possible: Ways to Net Zero

April 23, 2024, 5 p.m.

In his new book Chris looks at the remaining challenges for the energy transition. We know that we need to ‘electrify everything we can’ and that our power sources will be predominantly solar and wind. But what about the more intractable problems? Possible: Ways to Net Zero examines 18 different challenges, ranging from the cement industry or plastics through raw material shortages to issues such as capital shortages. In each short chapter Chris identifies a possible route and try to put a cost on it. The seminar will summarise the main conclusions.

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Worrying about China: Storytelling, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Global Circulation of Independent Chinese Documentary

April 23, 2024, 5 p.m.

This talk explores the impact of cross-border collaboration on independent Chinese documentary. Through a study of Wang Jiuliang’s Plastic China (2016), Dr Robinson argues that the film, which passed through training events run by CNEX and the Sundance Institute’s Documentary Film Programme in China, bears the formal impact of the industrial-humanitarian logic central to these workshops: character-driven storytelling. The latter format is, Dr Robinson argues, understood by transnational stakeholders such as CNEX and Sundance as key to generating a global Anglophone public for independent Chinese documentary. Tracing this logic through the workshop mechanism, the film’s form, and audience reactions to its screening in the UK, Dr Robinson suggests the result is a viewer response privileging personal action over structural critique – what in this context he terms ‘worrying about China.’ This allows him to locate the documentary in relation to broader liberal arguments over China’s place in the world system and assess the limitations of this approach to ‘going global’ for independent Chinese documentary. Luke Robinson is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies in the Department of Media and Film, University of Sussex. He is the author of Independent Chinese Documentary: From the Studio to the Street (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), and the editor, with Chris Berry, of Chinese Film Festivals: Sites of Translation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

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Southeast Asia between the Superpowers: Who is Where and Why?

April 23, 2024, 5 p.m.

One of the most pressing foreign policy challenges that the ten countries of Southeast Asia (ASEAN-10) faces today and in the coming years is how to position themselves between the US and China as the geopolitical rivalry between the two superpowers intensifies. Most in Southeast Asia claim they would prefer not to have to choose between the two superpowers, but that position will become increasingly difficult to maintain as the US and China pressure states in the region to align with them. This talk will address three key questions related to this strategic dilemma: What do the strategic alignments of the ASEAN-10 look like today? What explains their alignment choices? And what are the implications of the latter for Southeast Asia, the superpowers, and the region? Yuen Foong KHONG is Li Ka Shing Professor of Political Science at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. He was formerly Professor of International Relations and a Professorial Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford University. He received his PhD from Harvard University in 1987 and was Assistant/Associate Professor at Harvard University’s Government Department from 1987–1994. His dissertation received Harvard’s Sumner Prize for the best dissertation on war and peace (1988). His book, Analogies at War: Korea, Munich, Dien Bien Phu, and the Vietnam Decisions of 1965 (Princeton, 1992; sixth printing 2006; Chinese translation 2024) was co-winner of the American Political Science Association’s Political Psychology Book Award (1994). He also received the Erik Erikson Award for distinguished early career contribution to political psychology in 1996. From 1988–2000, he served as Deputy Director and Director of the Institute of Defense and Strategic Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

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A look behind the curtain of the Soviet dictatorship: a study of oral testimonies and documents by the former chairman of the KGB (1961-1967) Vladimir Semichastnyi

April 23, 2024, 5 p.m.

'The Rustle of Language, the Resistance of Voice: Columbia Records DF 3367 (Paris, 1950)'

April 23, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

This talk documents a seismic shift in the relationship among sound, language, and discourse in post-war France by listening closely to a single 78RPM record. Released in November of 1950, Columbia Records DF 3367 showcases singer Juliette Gréco singing three songs by Joseph Kosma. The disc’s A-side offers the first commercial recording of “Si tu t’imagines,” with lyrics by language poet Raymond Queneau. The B-side begins with the brief novelty number, “La Fourmi,” setting a whimsical poem about a gigantic polyglot ant by surrealist Robert Desnos and continues with a song from Jean-Paul Sartre’s play Huis Clos (No Exit, 1944). The record was an unexpected hit, catapulting Gréco and her collaborators from the intimacy of Saint-Germain-des-Près to international celebrity. Le Figaro marvelled at the disc’s success, observing how rarely a song that is not a dance number–let alone one whose “jaded tone seems pitched exclusively to young intellectuals”--could so flamboyantly take hold of the popular imagination. Besides their distinguished literary pedigrees, what these songs have in common is a tendency to break apart language, to resort to timbral effects to maximise expressive intensity. In Sartre’s song for No Exit, every single one of the song’s 17 lines ends with the same phoneme–⟨o⟩, as in “échafaud” [scaffold] or “boulot” [work]--and Kosma’s lilting melody pastes a carefree smile over the images of executioners and severed heads rolling into buckets. In Queneau’s carpe diem poem, “Si tu t’imagines,” the narrator’s warnings about the passage of time are punctuated by a slangy refrain (“Xa va, xa va, xa va”) that exploits the sharp edges of the singer’s tongue and palate. Each of these songs in its way revels in the arbitrary nature of signification, an idea that had gained prominence in the late 1940s as Roman Jakobson, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and others began to write and lecture about Saussure’s linguistics. Yet somehow these self-consciously ironic songs and their detached affect (“singing out of the side of her mouth,” as filmmaker Jacques Baratier described Gréco’s offhand delivery) came to be heard as capturing the pathos of the shattered city and lost lives in the aftermath of the German Occupation. This paper approaches Gréco’s début recording as a material object, a document of vocal performance practice, and a locus for notions of voice/language/history/politics that would define much of the musical production of the decade to come.

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‘Hecuba from Page to Stage in Early Modern England’ and ‘“Numbers flowe?” Plato’s Numbers and Spenser’s Line’

April 23, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Dr Carla Suthren (St Catz) ‘Hecuba from Page to Stage in Early Modern England’ Dr Beth Dubow (Oriel) ‘ “Numbers flowe?” Plato’s Numbers and Spenser’s Line’ All are welcome, Refreshments will be provided

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Scholars' Library: Jonathan Shapiro on How to be Abe Lincoln: Seven Steps Toward Leading a Legendary Life

April 23, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

For our April event, in conversation with another Scholar, *Jonathan Shapiro* (California & Oriel 1985) will discuss his newest book _How to be Abe Lincoln: Seven Steps Toward Leading a Legendary Life_. Amongst other topics, Jonathan will discuss questions such as: Does Lincoln still matter? Why is laughter the first step to being Lincoln? and how would Lincoln handle our current political climate? _How to Be Abe Lincoln_ shows us how to survive our dangerously fractious age, one that is too often unmoored from truth, ignorant of facts, and unwilling to do the hard work of becoming better. It is written for those who don't just admire Lincoln but want to emulate his rational, practical approach to law, love, leadership, and life. It identifies the seven steps that made Abe Lincoln legendary and teaches you how to follow them. Part of the Lifelong Fellowship portfolio, The Scholars’ Library is a monthly book talk series, where Rhodes alumni can come together to present, discover and debate their literary works. If you’re interested in getting involved, please reach out to Georgie Thurston at "$":mailto:alumni@rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk You can read more about this event and the speaker here: https://bit.ly/HowToBeAbeLincoln

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Late Style: Wordsworth and Some Others

April 23, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

A new economic strategy for Britain

April 23, 2024, 6 p.m.

Economic growth in the UK has been sluggish ever since the global financial crisis. More recent large-scale disruptions caused by Brexit and Covid-19 have created additional challenges to growth and the vital public services, institutions, and fiscal measures that underpin it. Productivity and public investment remain low. Meanwhile, stalling wage growth and the cost-of-living crisis continue to eat into households’ disposable income, discouraging spending while also deepening economic inequalities. What policies might underpin a new vision for prosperity – one that focuses not purely on growth but also ensures that economic gains are widely shared and environmentally sustainable? What are the prospects for cities like Oxford in rising to these challenges? And how can a new economic strategy deliver a just transition at both local, national and UK-wide levels? To discuss Britain’s future economic strategy, building on the analysis of The Economy 2030 Inquiry – a three-year collaboration between the Resolution Foundation and the LSE, funded by the Nuffield Foundation - moderator Clare Leaver, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government, is joined by Gregory Thwaites, Research Director, Resolution Foundation and Associate Professor, University of Nottingham’s School of Economics, Richard Venables MRICS DL, Senior Director and Head of Oxford Office, CBRE and İrem Güçeri, Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School.

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Kellogg Sustainability Quiz

April 23, 2024, 7 p.m.

Test your sustainability and general knowledge at the Kellogg Sustainability Quiz. There will be prizes for the winning team! This fun evening is open to all; you don’t need to be a sustainability guru to take part. Although, check out our Sustainability and Kellogg page anyway, just in case… Teams of three to five are welcome; one team member will need a smartphone, tablet or laptop to answer the questions and be part of the electronic leaderboard. Refreshments will be served from 18:30. If you are unable to attend after booking, please email events@kellogg.ox.ac.uk

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International Power

April 24, 2024, 11 a.m.

An interconnected world increases economic efficiency, while providing some nations with leverage over others. We investigate international power stemming from trade. We develop a model of trade with possibilities of international disputes, highlighting key features of how nations can exert coercive power toward one another through trade. The model yields a measure of international power, which we operationalize across all pairs of nations over the past 20 years. Using this measure, we examine the consequences and causes of international power. We compile comprehensive data on bilateral engagement events, and we develop a high-frequency measure of bilateral geopolitical relationships. We show that increases in international power between countries — which raise the credibility of threats of trade disruptions — induce more bilateral engagement and negotiations. Moreover, worsened geopolitical relationships — in anticipation of future disputes — prompt nations to build up greater international power through changes in trade activities.

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Primordial Origins of RNA Therapeutics

April 24, 2024, noon

Dr. Ehlers grew up in rural Nebraska and earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Caltech. He holds M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. At ATP, Dr. Ehlers directs the fund’s science-driven investment strategy by identifying and evaluating new breakthrough science around the world and turning it into business plans, management teams, and drug discovery and development programs. Dr. Ehlers is co-founder and CEO Ascidian Therapeutics, an RNA editing company developing exon editing technology for gene correction in hereditary diseases; co-founder and Chair of Aulos Bioscience, an immunooncology company advancing computationally-designed antibody therapeutics targeting interleukin-2 for diverse cancers; and co-founder and Chair of Replicate Bioscience, an RNA therapeutics company developing self-replicating RNA technologies for the treatment of infectious disease and cancer. Prior to joining ATP and its portfolio companies in 2019, Dr. Ehlers was Executive Vice President for Research & Development at Biogen, one of the world’s oldest and largest biopharmaceutical companies. At Biogen, Dr. Ehlers directed global research and development including discovery sciences, translational medicine, clinical development, and regulatory sciences with a focus on neurological, immunological, and rare diseases. During his time at Biogen, he advanced 20 novel clinical candidate compounds including overseeing the approval of SPINRAZAä(nusinersen), the first drug approved for spinal muscular atrophy, and VUMERITYä (diroximel fumarate), the second oral fumarate approved for multiple sclerosis, as well as advancing development programs for currently approved LEQEMBIä, the first fully approved drug for slowing cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease, and QALSODYä, the first genetic medicine for ALS. Before Biogen, Dr. Ehlers was Senior Vice President for BioTherapeutics and Chief Scientific Officer for Neuroscience at Pfizer where he created and advanced the Neuroscience and Rare Disease portfolios at Pfizer, successfully bringing 22 compounds into the clinic as well as directing global development activities in biologics design, synthesis, and manufacturing, and steering a network of academic collaborations focused on immunology and oncology. Before entering his industry career in 2010, he was George Barth Geller Professor and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Duke University Medical Center, where he pioneered studies on neuronal organelles and the trafficking of neurotransmitter receptors. Dr. Ehlers is the recipient of numerous awards including the 2003 Eppendorf & Science Prize in Neurobiology, the 2007 John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology, the 2007 Society for Neuroscience Young Investigator Award, an NIMH MERIT Award, and the 2009 National Alliance for Schizophrenia & Depression Distinguished Investigator Award. He received the 2008 Breakthrough Research Award of the North Carolina Biotechnology Center given to a single scientist in North Carolina, and the 2016 Biomedical Research Award of the Massachusetts Medical Society given to a single business leader in New England. In 2013 he became the 11th recipient of the Thudichum Medal of the Biochemical Society of the United Kingdom. Dr. Ehlers has authored over 100 scientific papers, served on the Editorial Boards of Annual Reviews in Medicine, Annual Reviews in Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Journal of Neuroscience, the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, and sat on advisory committees of the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience Board of Directors, serves on the advisory boards of several private foundations, and advises major pharmaceutical, venture, academic, government, and biotech organizations.

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Title TBC

April 24, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

Title TBC

April 24, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

CHG Lunchtime Lab Talks: Band Group and CPM

April 24, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Band Group 12:30-13:00 Speaker(s): Gavin Band Title(s): "The reverse malaria hypothesis" Centre for Personalised Medicine 13:00-13:30 Speaker(s): Emilie Wigdor Title(s): “Investigating the role of common cis-regulatory variants in modifying penetrance of putatively damaging, inherited variants in severe neurodevelopmental disorders”

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Incorporating Academic skills into PGT courses

April 24, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

This meeting will focus on recognising and incorporating crucial academic skills into MSc Programs. We're delighted to have Helen Webster, an Educational Development Consultant with expertise in Academic Skills Development at the Centre for Teaching and Learning, alongside Sam McIlroy, the Head of Academic English at the Oxford University Language Centre, and Margaret Coombe, the Former Director of the Oxford Study Skills Centre at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford, sharing their valuable insights on academic skills. At the end of the workshop, there will be an opportunity for attendees to discuss and exchange experiences with each other.

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Session 1: Using a theory of change in an Agile Sprint (online webinar)

April 24, 2024, 1 p.m.

Understand how to use a theory of change to frame your research project and deliver rapid policy-relevant change. This is workshop is open to: Oxford University researchers planning to develop an Agile Sprint; Oxford University researchers working on other applied research projects who wish to learn how to use theory of change in research project design; previous Agile researchers wishing to review how the theory of change informed their work on an Agile Sprint for use in the future. What will you get out of it? You do not need to have prior knowledge or experience of developing a theory of change. By the end of this workshop, you will understand: How a basic theory of change has been used with the initial Agile Sprints and the applicability of the approach to the design of rapid, policy-focused research How a theory of change will help you scope your research goals, ensure applicability of research findings across a range of stakeholders, and define potential outcomes for the communities most affected by the research How the theory of change will help you to plan and organise your research, and work through the interrelationships between work packages and how their integration will support planned impact. “Working through the Theory of Change was a very helpful process. I already had a research timeline mapped out, but the ToC really helped clarify how the findings would be shared through specific outputs, and what these were intended to achieve. This is especially important for fast turnaround, impact-focussed research like the Agile Sprints: we hope the research will have a legacy beyond the Sprint itself, and having a clear Theory of Change helps demonstrate this longer-term ambition.” -Dr John Lynch Book your place on the workshop through the links provided. If you need to cancel your place, please do so no later than 48 hours before the workshop. By booking on this workshop, you have agreed to the externally facing use of the recording. Participation: Please note you will be expected to actively participate, which includes joining discussion, listening, asking questions, and contributing to activities.

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Refusing AI: How Journalists Avoid Falling for AI’s Hype

April 24, 2024, 1 p.m.

: Following a year-long series of interviews with journalists and newsworkers, this presentation draws from the concept of technological refusal to understand how journalists are anticipating and appropriating AI systems in their newsrooms. Refusal can take two forms. On the one hand, it can signal the withdrawal from engaging with certain technologies. “I will not work with AI.” On the other, refusal does not have to be a conversation-ender. As my research shows, journalists are, on an informed basis, refusing to engage with artificial intelligence systems on the terms set by third-party stakeholders. In doing so, journalists are opening the door to have a different conversation: A conversation about how to engage with these systems differently. Journalists are imagining new ways of being with AI systems, auditing these technologies not as individuals but as a well-informed collective. In doing so, journalists’ refusal is an act of design that informs how these technologies are being appropriated in their newsrooms. In this talk, I present results from different research projects that identify not only shortcomings inside newsrooms in the form of knowledge silos and low media literacy but also strategies aimed at generating new opportunities to use refusal as a gatekeeping strategy to improve their work. Tomás Dodds is an Assistant Professor in Journalism and New Media at Leiden University and a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. He is also a researcher in the AI, Media & Democracy Lab in the Netherlands and the Artificial Intelligence and Society Hub [IA+SIC] in Chile. Tomás’ current research interests focus on artificial intelligence and automation in the media sector, immersive technologies, civic data science, and governance of technologies and the Internet.

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Exploring cell-intrinsic innate immunity to advance antiviral strategies

April 24, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

2024 Oxford University of Sanctuary Fair

April 24, 2024, 2 p.m.

University of Oxford is approaching its 1st anniversary as the first intercollegiate university to be awarded the University of Sanctuary Status in May 2023. The university will host a Sanctuary Fair on Wednesday 24th April from 2-6 pm held at Worcester College’s Sultan Nazrin Shah Centre. We invite students, college and departmental representatives, faculty as well as staff across the university to join us in making sanctuary a reality at Oxford and learn more about our commitment to ensuring an inclusive culture for sanctuary seekers in our university and the wider city. All members are invited to attend.

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Career Transitions: Navigating from academia to beyond (and back!) - online workshop

April 24, 2024, 3 p.m.

In this online workshop you will hear from Oxford Alumni who have navigated transitions across academia, industry, government, and the clinic – and back again! Discover personal narratives from former fellows and postdocs and Oxford academics as they share their experiences transitioning from academia to diverse professional realms. Gain valuable insights into their decision-making process, strategic planning, and lessons learned along their career journeys so far. You will also hear about the benefits that career coaching can bring to your career planning. 1. Moving into Industry - Liam Brown - Associate Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca 2. Developing relationships to bolster collaboration - Charlotte Green - Head of Business Development- Drug Discovery Unit, University of Dundee 3. Shaping science policy - Lorna Daniels - Senior Policy Advisor- R&D Strategy and Capability, Government Office for Science 4. How coaching can help your career transitions – Tony Bradshaw, Biosocius 5. Consulting as a career - Claudia Guida - Senior Manager, Regulatory Science, Kinesys Consulting Ltd 6. Starting your own group in a new institution - Nora Bengoa-Vergniory, Principal Investigator at Achucarro Basque Center for Neuroscience 7. Experiences of returning from industry to academia - Duncan Richards, Climax Professorship of Clinical Therapeutics and Director of Oxford Clinical Trials Research Unit, University of Oxford Thanks to our chair for the workshop Roel De Maeyer. This workshop is brought to you by the Industry Fellows and Postdocs Network.

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Oxford Technology & Security Nexus — AI in the Workplace and Employment Power Dynamics

April 24, 2024, 3 p.m.

Note that this week we'll be in the Nuffield Cole Room. This week, Nikki Sun will be speaking about how AI is being used in workplaces in China and its influence on the power dynamics between workers and employers. About Nikki: Nikki Sun is a programme manager at the Oxford Martin AI Governance Initiative. She has a decade of experience working at the intersection between journalism, public policy, and emerging technologies. Prior to joining Oxford, she was a researcher at Chatham House, where she studied the impact of AI on employment and labour in China. Nikki is a seasoned speaker at UK parliamentary sessions on labour policies and runs training courses for UK civil servants. Before moving to the UK, Nikki was an award-winning journalist and columnist in Hong Kong where she covered China technology and politics. Her work appears in publications including Nikkei Asia, Financial Times, and South China Morning Post. Nikki studied journalism at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and holds an MSc in international political economy from King’s College London.

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Internationalizing Education Research: Bridging National and Global Perspectives in Japan's Education and Comparative Education Research

April 24, 2024, 3 p.m.

Education research and its academic communities have developed in close connection with national education systems. However, increased globalization and digital interconnectedness necessitate the internationalization of educational research, which demands deeper engagement with international colleagues and communities. This presents a substantial challenge, particularly for Japan's education research communities that are deeply rooted in the national language and research structures. What should be done to provide early career researchers in education with future research perspectives and careers that are well connected to international research communities as well as national and local educational communities? What is the role of comparative education research in this context? Drawing on my research with leading experts, I will explore diverse perspectives on internationalization from the leaders of educational research associations, early career researchers, and prominent comparative education scholars.

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Healthcare within a humanitarian crisis: experiences from Gaza

April 24, 2024, 3 p.m.

We are delighted to be joined by Mr Khaled Dawas who will be talking about his recent experiences of working in Gaza as a surgeon providing emergency care. He will share his reflections on the targeting of health facilities and health workers during the conflict, the implications for medical education in Palestine and the role of global health students and practitioners world-wide. This session will have the main lecture delivered by Mr Dawas and will also feature perspectives of other health workers who have experiences of working in Gaza, including Dr Jane Crawley (paediatrics) and Dr Shameq Syed (GP). Mr Khaled Dawas is a consultant surgeon and associate professor at University College London Hospitals. He chairs the board of the medical education charity, Al Quds Foundation for Medical Schools in Palestine. He has been to Gaza twice with emergency medical teams since December 2023. This session will have a presentation followed by Q & A. This talk is part of the Translational Science and Global Health course on the Translational Health Sciences programme.

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Book Launch: Pax Economica: Left-Wing Visions of a Free Trade World

April 24, 2024, 5 p.m.

Today, free trade is often associated with right-wing free marketeers. In Pax Economica, historian Marc-William Palen shows that free trade and globalisation in fact have roots in nineteenth-century left-wing politics. In this counterhistory of an idea, Palen explores how, beginning in the 1840s, left-wing globalists became the leaders of the peace and anti-imperialist movements of their age. By the early twentieth century, an unlikely alliance of liberal radicals, socialist internationalists, feminists, and Christians envisioned free trade as essential for a prosperous and peaceful world order. Of course, this vision was at odds with the era’s strong predilections for nationalism, protectionism, geopolitical conflict, and colonial expansion. Palen reveals how, for some of its most radical left-wing adherents, free trade represented a hard-nosed critique of imperialism, militarism, and war. Palen shows that the anti-imperial component of free trade was a phenomenon that came to encompass the political left wing within the British, American, Spanish, German, Dutch, Belgian, Italian, Russian, French, and Japanese empires. The left-wing vision of a “pax economica” evolved to include supranational regulation to maintain a peaceful free-trading system—which paved the way for a more liberal economic order after World War II and such institutions as the United Nations, the European Union, and the World Trade Organization. Palen’s findings upend how we think about globalisation, free trade, anti-imperialism, and peace. Rediscovering the left-wing history of globalism offers timely lessons for our own era of economic nationalism and geopolitical conflict. Marc-William Palen is a historian at the University of Exeter. His other publications include The "Conspiracy" of Free Trade: The Anglo-American Struggle over Empire and Economic Globalisation, 1846-1896 (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He is co-director of History & Policy's Global Economics and History Forum and founding editor of the Imperial & Global Forum, the blog of Exeter's Centre for Imperial and Global History. He was an RAI postdoctoral fellow in Autumn 2015.

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Crisis in the Sahel: Causes and Consequences for Africa, Europe and the Muslim World

April 24, 2024, 5 p.m.

Past, present, and future of economic growth: how we should rethink it

April 24, 2024, 5 p.m.

Over the past two centuries, economic growth has freed billions from poverty and made our lives far healthier and longer. As a result, the unfettered pursuit of growth defines economic life around the world. Yet this prosperity has come at an enormous price: deepening inequalities, destabilising technologies, environmental destruction and climate change. Confusion reigns. For many, in our era of anaemic economic progress, the worry is slowing growth - in the UK, Europe, China and elsewhere. Others understandably claim, given its costs, that the only way forward is through 'degrowth', deliberating shrinking our economies. At this time of uncertainty about growth and its value, award-winning economist Daniel Susskind has written Growth: A Reckoning and in this talk, with Professor Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalisation and Development, he will argue that we cannot abandon growth but instead we must redirect it, making it better reflect what we truly value. He will explores what really drives growth, and offers original ideas for combatting our economic slowdown. This event will be followed by a drinks reception and book sale, all welcome REGISTRATION To register to attend in person in Oxford: https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/events/growth-a-reckoning/ To register to watch live online on Crowdcast click here: https://www.crowdcast.io/c/growth-a-reckoning

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Creating Thriving Communities: How do we build socially productive places?

April 24, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

The Global Centre on Healthcare and Urbanisation Public Seminar series brings together members of the public, researchers and practitioners interested and engaged in urban health issues. The principal aim of the series is to provoke debate and constructive action, linking current best practice in urban development with emerging areas of health research. The social dimension in the triple bottom line of sustainability has often been overlooked, but increasingly we have seen a focus on assessing the social impact and social value of the built environment (for example through new housing and regeneration projects). Alongside this there has been debate as to how we can create thriving places, where new and existing communities interact to foster community wealth and wellbeing. In this seminar we draw on expertise from academia, local government, and the NGO and built environment sectors to take a critical look at what social sustainability, social value and community wealth really means in practice, and how such concepts can be assessed and measured. We will also explore why this is important in creating socially productive places through a more 'considerate urbanism' by drawing on a range of real-world examples to create a forum for lively debate and discussion with our audience.

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The Lycurgus Cup: new data from rediscovered samples and modern analytical techniques, sheds further light on the Dichroic nature of the 1,600 year old Roman glass of the Lycurgus Cup

April 24, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

There is a wealth of theory in countless publications regarding the dichroic nature of the glass used in the famous 4th century Roman Lycurgus Cup. However, hands-on practical analytical research on this very special object has not been undertaken for nearly 35 years. Since that time there have been substantial developments and improvements in all Analytical Scientific instruments and many new ways for data collection have become available. Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM) are now able to scan/raster very small electron beams to produce images and other analytical data streams at up to atomic resolution. Specimen preparation for TEM has also advanced enormously, such that ideally electron transparent thin specimens, typically of around 100 nm thickness, can be made from precisely targeted areas in bulk samples - the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument. 3D imaging using X-Ray beams can produce density images to reveal internal structural details (the Micro-CT instrument). Optical Spectroscopy can be used to verify theoretical calculations now commonly used in Plasmonic science (UV VIS Spectroscopy). Data collected on rediscovered samples of the Lycurgus Cup gives a new insight into the dichroic nature of the glass and demonstrates very clearly the remarkable work done 1,600 years ago by the Roman glass makers. This talk will show new unpublished data and explain how the dichroism works.

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Developing Combined Simulations and Cryo-EM Methods for a Quantitative Understanding of Conformational Landscapes

April 25, 2024, 10 a.m.

Many continuous heterogeneity methods generate landscapes with volumes corresponding to regions with particles, but it is difficult to obtain interpretable and comparable results. Therefore, we have developed the Scipion Flexibility Hub and a pipeline based around atomic models fitted to the volumes generated by continuous heterogeneity methods. This approach makes use of the ProDy software for protein structure and dynamics analysis, enabling landscapes to be projected onto meaningful axes, such as inter-residue distances and principal components (PCs) of residue motion. The PCs can be visualized in the normal mode wizard (NMWiz) in VMD. These axes can be easily used for structures coming from different datasets, the PDB, or molecular simulations, enabling their comparison in a common space. We have extensively tested this pipeline on various datasets including the spike glycoprotein from two SARS-CoV-2 variants, enabling us to draw conclusions about the overall variation within both datasets together as well as differences between them that may underlie variant effects. We compared these with published structures, revealing potential effects of other conditions such as stabilizing mutations.

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Congenital disorders of autophagy and intracellular trafficking – a novel class of neurometabolic disorders linking aberrant neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration

April 25, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Autophagy is an essential intracellular degradative pathway conserved throughout evolution with fundamental roles in metabolic adaptation, defence against infection and the quality control of defective proteins and organelles. Primary dysfunction of autophagy due to Mendelian defects affecting core components of the autophagy machinery or closely related proteins have recently emerged as an important cause of genetic disease. This novel group of human disorders comprises several early-onset neurodevelopmental disorders, including Vici syndrome due to recessive mutations in EPG5, as well as various forms of hereditary spastic paraparesis, ataxia and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Early-onset (or congenital) disorders of autophagy often share a recognizable “clinical signature”, including distinct but variable combinations of neurological, neuromuscular and multisystem manifestations. Structural CNS abnormalities, cerebellar involvement, spasticity and peripheral nerve pathology are prominent neurological features, indicating a specific vulnerability of certain neuronal populations to autophagic disturbance. A typically biphasic disease course of late-onset neurodegeneration occurring on the background of a neurodevelopmental disorder further supports a role of autophagy in both neuronal development and maintenance. In addition, an associated myopathy has been characterized in several conditions. The differential diagnosis comprises a wide range of other multisystem disorders, including mitochondrial, glycogen and lysosomal storage disorders. The clinical overlap between the congenital disorders of autophagy and these conditions reflects the multiple roles of the defective proteins and/or emerging molecular connections between the pathways implicated, suggesting an exciting area for future research. Therapy development for congenital disorders of autophagy is still in its infancy but may result in the identification of molecules that target autophagy more specifically than currently available compounds. The close connection with adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders highlights the relevance of research into rare early-onset neurodevelopmental conditions for much more common, age-related human diseases.

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Cell Shape Sensing by Immune Cells

April 25, 2024, noon

Immune cells experience large deformation events while paroling their environment. These cell shape changes arise from the continuous physical constraints encountered during migration within tissues and organs. It has become increasingly clear that these cells can survive and adapt to changes in cell shape using dedicated shape-sensing pathways. However, how shape sensing impacts their behavior and function remains largely unknown. During my seminar, I will show unpublished data highlighting that the nuclear shape changes experienced by immune cells define their migratory behavior and immunoregulatory properties, revealing the contribution of the physical properties of tissues to tuning of the balance between tolerance an immunity.

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Conflict Resolution & Problem-Solving Fundamentals

April 25, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Are you tired of letting conflicts simmer unresolved? Are you ready to navigate difficult conversations with confidence and grace? Join us for our upcoming workshop, 'Conflict Resolution & Problem-Solving Fundamentals' and learn how to have difficult conversations and solve problems, as well as exploring strategies for managing and avoiding conflicts. Designed specifically for researchers, this course provides micro-learning units and a live workshop to offer invaluable tools and techniques to effectively address conflicts head-on, fostering a more harmonious and productive work environment. Gain insights into proactive conflict resolution strategies, learn to communicate assertively yet empathetically, and acquire the skills needed to transform contentious situations into opportunities for growth and collaboration. You will also get the opportunity to submit your questions ahead of time and have them answered anonymously during the workshop in a user-generated content (UGC) Q&A style! Don't let conflicts hinder your research progress. Invest in your professional development and join us to master the art of managing difficult conversations with confidence.

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Medical Grand Rounds - Week 3: Oncology

April 25, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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Exploring and Therapeutically Exploiting the Tumor Microenvironment

April 25, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

Robert Boyle's Strange Reports: From the Outlandish to the Supernatural

April 25, 2024, 2 p.m.

“Strange Reports” was a work that Robert Boyle began to publish right at the end of his life and left incomplete at his death. The published section comprised accounts of phenomena that were extraordinary yet were ‘purely Natural’. The unpublished part, on the other hand, promised to deal with ‘Phænomena, that are, or seem to be, of a Supernatural Kind or Order’, and this can be reconstructed from surviving materials among Boyle’s manuscripts. It is evident that this component had not formed part of his original plan for Strange Reports. Instead, Boyle’s perhaps surprising hope to provide indisputable empirical evidence of the existence of a supernatural realm seems to have grown in significance in his later years, evidently due to his increasing concern about the threat of ‘atheism’.

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Webinar 4 | Open Science

April 25, 2024, 2 p.m.

Open Science has been established as a key priority by policy actors at national, regional and international level (e.g. ministries of higher education and research; European Commission; UNESCO), with the ambitions to improve the quality and impact of the knowledge being produced while at the same time changing research practices both in terms of knowledge production and dissemination. This growing commitments to Open Science has led to an increasing amount of debates within the higher education sector on how to achieve this openness as well as incentives for universities and higher education stakeholders more widely to propose solutions to meet ambitious expectations regarding: Open access to research data, processes, outputs and publications to make them more widely available and guaranteeing more fluid circulation across the research landscape and for relevant stakeholders outside of academia; Collaborations across universities globally and with industry and civil society; Management and protection of research data. Despite these commitments, there remains debates on the type of regulations that should be established defining the degree of Openness that should be promoted in order to find a balance between accessibility and protection of research data and researchers, and the type of support and training required for university communities as a whole (students, academic, managerial administrative staff) to achieve these ambitious objectives.

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Title TBC

April 25, 2024, 2 p.m.

Open scholarship: logistics of open scholarship

April 25, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

The second in a duo of courses (attendees should attend the Fundamentals course prior to Logistics) that will cover the logistics of researching, publishing, and locating open scholarship resources and tools at the University of Oxford. Subjects include: what is the Oxford University Research Archive; depositing work into ORA via Symplectic Elements; depositing data into ORA-data; applying for one of Oxford’s APC block grants; registering or connecting your ORCID; how to be included in the rights retention pilot; and locating and checking funder policies. Ideally the 'Fundamentals of Open Access' course will have been attended. If you’re not in a position to attend this course you can find similar information in our e-learning package to work through prior to attending Logistics. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Title TBC

April 25, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

Migration Governance in the Global South: Setting the Scene

April 25, 2024, 3:45 p.m.

Panel discussion This first seminar sets the scene and provides a framework for this term’s COMPAS seminar series, which focuses on migration governance in the Global South. The opening seminar deals with the terminology of migration governance, its actors, and specific features in the Global South, particularly in Africa. This seminar will be hybrid: you can join us in person at 64 Banbury Road, Oxford (the seminar room will open 10 minutes before the scheduled start time) or on Zoom: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJItcO2urjwrGt2nb5d0fdWwtFnOKRpQMNVg

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Carrying out High-Quality Qualitative Research: The Importance of Hard Choices - Methods in Social Policy and Intervention Research

April 25, 2024, 4 p.m.

Annette Lareau discusses the tensions in how researchers approach the design for qualitative data. Emphasizing the need for depth and richness in the data, as well as a systematic discussion of conceptual issues, Lareau calls for limiting variability in data collection by making very hard choices. By focusing on specific class, race, or gender groups, and limiting the number of these groups, researchers have a greater possibility of creating very high-quality data. Through these difficult choices, researchers have the opportunity to make strong, conceptually-based claims about specific groups, which can then deepen our knowledge of social mechanisms. Lareau illustrates the discussion with examples of the methodological choices she made in her research for "Unequal Childhoods" as well as for her current research project on high-net-worth families. Booking is required for people outside of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI). The registration form will be available soon. DSPI members do not need to register

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OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Three

April 25, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Three: Regional Community-Building in Hard Times: Entry Restrictions in EU Member States During the COVID-19 Pandemic Presenter: Professor Frank Schimmelfennig, ETH Zürich Discussant: Angie Jo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Fear and Loathing in Public Policy Compliance: A COVID-19 Case Study Presenter: Professor Stella Ladi, Queen Mary University of London Discussant: Dr Gina Gustavsson, Uppsala University The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 16:00-17:30 BST.

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Making History Here: Community History in Oxfordshire

April 25, 2024, 4 p.m.

Our second event, _*Making History Here: Community History in Oxfordshire*_, begins with an optional walking tour highlighting the ‘Forgotten Stories of Oxford', led by community historian and creative artist, Rawz; followed by a panel discussion exploring the experiences of historians working in and on Oxford and Oxfordshire. _*LOCATION:* The walking tour starts at the History Faculty (41-47 George St, Oxford, OX1 2BE): circulating round key sites in the city centre, before returning to the building. Refreshments and snacks will then be served in the Faculty Common Room, and the panel discussion will take place in the Lecture Theatre._ We invite anyone interested in historical studies to join us for a rich, engaging discussion. We also welcome you to get involved with our Hub’s growing network of History researchers and students by subscribing to our mailing list here: https://history.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=a9a000a334eed73ebb30a07ed&id=e45169abd9. If you have any questions about the event, booking or access requirements, please email the Community History team at "$":mailto:community@history.ox.ac.uk, and we will be happy to assist you.

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Innovative pathways to accelerate the solar energy revolution: an Australian perspective

April 25, 2024, 4 p.m.

A rapid transition to renewable energy sources is essential in order to curtail the harmful impacts of climate change. In the case of solar photovoltaics (PV), primary drivers to spur increased adoption and enhance accessibility are to lower the cost per watt of solar products and to expand the technology to applications beyond traditional panels. While improving the energy conversion efficiency of PV technology has been the focus of research traditionally, this is now expected to provide more limited returns as devices approach their theoretical efficiency limits. This talk will explore a selection of alternative pathways towards accelerating PV uptake, including using microwave technology to improve solar module manufacturing and recycling, and the development of energy generating windows based on luminescent solar concentrators. The presentation will showcase some of the latest research from Macquarie University's Photovoltaics Research group as well as broader insights into recent industry trends and innovations taking place in Australia. Short biography of the speaker: Dr David Payne is a Senior Lecturer and the head of the Photovoltaics and Optical Characterisation Lab in the School of Engineering at Macquarie University. His primary field of expertise is silicon photovoltaics, with a view towards lowering the cost and increasing the efficiency of solar cells to accelerate the uptake of sustainable and clean energy production. He has led several large collaborative research projects in partnership with major solar industrial manufacturers such as Hanwha Q Cells and Canadian Solar. His research background includes nanophotonics and light-trapping, silicon defect mitigation, scientific tool development, and advanced optical characterisation and simulation. Prior to joining Macquarie, Dr Payne received his PhD from the University of Southampton in 2014 and worked as a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering at the University of New South Wales.

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Love as the Reason We Need Abortion

April 25, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

A series of three public lectures, by Professor Elizabeth Harman (in-person only). Lecture 1 of 3. What does love teach us about abortion? How does love challenge our ideas about abortion? How can love explain the importance of abortion?

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TGU Talk: (Title TBC) by Dr Rory Peters, Oxford

April 25, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

‘A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Agora: The Queer Politics of Literariness’

April 25, 2024, 4:45 p.m.

“A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Agora: The Queer Politics of Literariness” traces the relation between the linguistic turn in literary studies and the emergence of queer theory. Showing how the advent of structuralism followed by the wide-spread dissemination of deconstruction, introduced a cultural anxiety about the separation of literary studies from its vitalizing social contexts, this talk examines the logic by which that separation got taken up by theorists of queer negativity and reframed precisely as a political response to the social order’s dominant values. Tracing this movement in the context of my own scholarly career, this talk brings out the ironic relation between the academy and the agora in a moment when the former is increasingly stigmatized as marginal and queer, and therefore, paradoxically, as of urgent concern to the latter. Zoom link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81474961273?pwd=ftGpP4ikbYuxi2q4rwkLgOBrbdcyGH.1

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Blavatnik Book Talks: The Weight of Nature

April 25, 2024, 5 p.m.

It is now inarguable that climate change threatens the future of life on Earth. But in The Weight of Nature, award-winning journalist and neuroscientist Clayton Page Aldern shows that the warming climate is not just affecting our planet – it is affecting our brains and bodies too. Drawing on seven years of ground-breaking research, Aldern documents a burgeoning public health crisis that has gone largely unreported. Eco-anxiety, he shows us, is just the tip of the iceberg. The rapidly changing environment is directly intervening in our brain health, behaviour, decision-making and cognition in real time, affecting everything from spikes in aggravated assault to lower levels of productivity and concentration, to the global dementia epidemic. Travelling the world to meet the scientists and doctors unravelling the tangled connections between us and our environment, and reporting the stories of those who are already feeling these shifts most keenly, Aldern shows how climate change isn’t just around us, but within us. Lucid, urgent and at times deeply moving, The Weight of Nature is a revelation, bringing to light the myriad ways in which the natural world tugs and prods at the decisions you make; how it twists and folds your memories and mental states; how this nebulous everywhere we call the environment is changing our very humanity from the inside out. Join author Clayton Page Aldern for a short reading of his book The Weight of Nature, followed by a moderated Q&A session and a drinks reception from 18:00-18:45, where you will be able to purchase the book.

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Paulina Kewes, University of Oxford, The First Tudor Succession Tract?

April 25, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Week 1 Paulina Kewes, University of Oxford 25 April The First Tudor Succession Tract? Offered by the Faculties of History and Theology and Religion. Drinks will be served after the seminar on 25 April and 13 June. For more information, or for the Teams link to join remotely, please contact sarah.apetrei@campion.ox.ac.uk.

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Title TBC

April 25, 2024, 5 p.m.

Buddhists in the Print Culture of Republican China

April 25, 2024, 5 p.m.

Driven by technological development, political and social change, and the potential for massive profits, publishing grew explosively during the first thirty-eight years of the Republic of China, resulting in the production of hundreds of thousands of titles. While most academic assessments of this era focus on the large commercial presses based in Shanghai, there was a diverse range of groups who also participated in this print culture, among them Chinese Buddhists who produced thousands of titles and tens of millions of copies of their own works. Dr Scott's presentation will introduce his ongoing research into how Buddhists contributed to the print culture of this era, how they adopted modern approaches to book and periodical production and circulation, and how they preserved certain aspects of their own print practices in specific contexts. In doing so Dr Scott illuminates important aspects of modern Chinese print culture, and an important facet of the modern Chinese Buddhist revival. Dr Gregory Adam Scott is Senior Lecturer in Chinese Culture and History at the University of Manchester. His research examines Buddhist culture in China in the late Qing and Republican eras, especially print culture and publishing.

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The Ubiquity of Braids - Tara Brendle

April 25, 2024, 5 p.m.

What do maypole dancing, grocery delivery, and the quadratic formula all have in common? The answer is: braids! In this talk Tara will explore how the ancient art of weaving strands together manifests itself in a variety of modern settings, both within mathematics and in our wider culture. Tara Brendle is a Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematics & Statistics at the University of Glasgow. Her research lies in the area of geometric group theory, at the interface between algebra and topology. She is co-author of 'Braids: A Survey', appearing in 'The Handbook of Knot Theory'. Please email external-relations@maths.ox.ac.uk to attend in person. The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel (https://www.youtube.com/c/OxfordMathematics) on Thursday 16 May at 5-6pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version). The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Keep your friends close but your enemies closer: Net Zero and the fossil fuel sector

April 25, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

What is the definition of net zero necessary to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement? What does this imply for the net zero plans of fossil fuel extractors?

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Clear Water, Clear Conscience? Free Panel Discussion

April 25, 2024, 6 p.m.

Modern-day science is able to provide us with more information on water quality than ever before. Join us for a panel discussion about the health benefits of sharing water quality information — whether that be with wild swimmers in the UK or rural populations in Asia and Africa. Having access to information can help people make choices about water use, such as when they need to treat drinking water, or whether or not to swim in a particular stretch of river. Information can also be used to campaign for better policies to help promote water safety and security. But collecting and sharing this data creates challenges as well as opportunities. In this panel discussion, we'll be thinking about how water quality information can reduce health risks and campaign for policies and investments to address pollution. The talk is free but registration is recommended. About the Panellists: Dr Saskia Nowicki works on understanding, measuring, and communicating water risks and trade-offs, especially as they relate to environmental health. She applies an interdisciplinary systems-based approach to research, drawing on a background in environmental science with specialisation in water science, policy and management. Her current research focuses on drinking-water safety in rural low-income contexts including the REACH programme observatories in Kenya, Bangladesh and Ethiopia, using mixed-methods to seek insight at multiple levels from the molecular to the institutional. Kate French completed a Water Science, Policy and Management Masters at the University of Oxford and is now in the midst of a Said Business School MBA. Her combined two-year programme of studies is being undertaken under an Oxford-Pershing Square Scholarship, awarded for her demonstrable potential and commitment to finding scalable and sustainable solutions to world-scale social challenges. Her MSc dissertation focused on ethics in water quality results communication. Prior to taking up her current scholarship she worked on technical and operational aspects of a major USAID-funded programme in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Nancy Gladstone comes from a family of wild swimmers but is always keen to know what she is getting herself into! This has led to various adventures both offline and on, exploring the macroinvertebrate diversity of Herefordshire streams, collecting river water samples from around Oxfordshire for the Oxford Rivers Project, and checking out water quality information on anywhere she travels. She is communications lead for the REACH Water Security programme at the University of Oxford and has developed educational materials on a range of water security issues for schools through the Water Learning Partnership and the Pan African Conservation Education project.

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Clear Water, Clear Conscience?

April 25, 2024, 6 p.m.

Modern-day science is able to provide us with more information on water quality than ever before. Join us for a panel discussion about the health benefits of sharing water quality information — whether that be with wild swimmers in the UK or rural populations in Asia and Africa. Having access to information can help people make choices about water use, such as when they need to treat drinking water, or whether or not to swim in a particular stretch of river. Information can also be used to campaign for better policies to help promote water safety and security. But collecting and sharing this data creates challenges as well as opportunities. In this panel discussion, we'll be thinking about how water quality information can reduce health risks and campaign for policies and investments to address pollution.

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Social Infrastructure and Left Behind Places

April 25, 2024, 6:30 p.m.

This lecture discusses ‘Social Infrastructure and Left Behind Places’ by authors John Tomaney, Maeve Blackman, Lucy Natarajan, Dimitrios Panayotopoulos-Tsiros, Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite and Myfanwy Taylor. The book explores the making, unmaking and remaking of social infrastructure in ‘left-behind places’. Such places, typically once flourishing industrial communities that have been excluded from recent economic growth, now attract academic and policy attention as sites of a political backlash against globalisation and liberal democracy. The book focuses on the role of social infrastructure as a key component of this story. Seeking to move beyond a narrowly economistic way of reading ‘left behind places’, the book addresses the understudied affective dimensions of ‘left-behindness’. It develops an analytical framework that emphasises the importance of place attachments and the consequences of their disruption; considers ‘left behind places’ as ‘moral communities’ and the making of social infrastructure as an expression of this; views the unmaking of social infrastructure through the lens of ‘root shock’; and explains efforts at remaking it in terms of the articulation of ‘radical hope’. The analysis builds upon a case study of a former mining community in County Durham, North East England.

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Workshop - “Domicide”: State violence and the destruction of home in the Middle East and China

April 26, 2024, 10 a.m.

“Domicide”, the deliberate destruction of the built environment and of the material, symbolic, and affective spaces of “home”, has become an increasingly urgent focus for scholars across disciplines. This informal workshop brings together historians, geographers, and political scientists to consider how we can use domicide as an analytical frame to understand “slow violence”, structural violence, and the relationships between society, space, and the smaller scales of individual, family, and community life in the increasingly hostile conditions of contemporary global history. Participants include: *Ammar Azzouz*, author of _Domicide: Architecture, War, and the Destruction of Home in Syria_, and *Salwa Ismail*, author of _The Rule of Violence: Subjectivity, Memory, and Government in Syria_, on the Syrian regime and civil war; *Margaret Hillenbrand*, author of _On the Edge: Feeling Precarious in China_, and *Jennifer Altehenger* (Co-Director, Oxford Centre for Global History) on China; with *Farida Makar* (History Faculty) on struggles over space and heritage in Cairo; *Alex Vasudevan* (School of Geography and the Environment) on urban precarity in Europe.

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Engineering T-cells for solid tumor therapy

April 26, 2024, 11 a.m.

To Bennu and Back: First Results from the OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission

April 26, 2024, noon

In September 2023, NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft completed a 7-year mission to return a pristine sample of the asteroid Bennu to Earth. Bennu is rich in carbon and water and holds important clues about the processes and events that shaped the evolution of habitable environments in the early Solar System. I’ll talk about the initial curation and analysis of the returned samples and what we’ve discovered about the composition of Bennu so far.

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Migrant Approaches, Family Patterns and Social Integration: the Striving Teams' Family Migration in Contemporary China

April 26, 2024, 1 p.m.

There has been a long-standing academic debate on why the migrant families fail to integrate into the cities where they live and work in contemporary China. Exploring the main migrant approaches and family patterns of migrant workers, this talk attempts to design a corresponding policy scheme for migrant families’ integration into the city. It reveals four approaches of migrant workers’ family migration (i.e. ordered migration, one-off family migration, intergenerational migration and reflux migration) and four types of family patterns (i.e. some migrate and some left-behind, split family, reunited family and returning family). The social precarity has increased dramatically, and family pattern has adjusted diversely. While highlighting the specificity of China’s situation, this research argues for the more general implications of China’s case for other developing countries in terms of migrant families’ social precarity and city integration. Godfrey Wu, a Visiting Scholar at the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, is an Assistant Professor at the School of Public Administration, Central South University.

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In conversation with Professor Anthony Reddie

April 26, 2024, 1 p.m.

Race & Resistance is pleased to welcome Professor Anthony Reddie to open our series of events for Trinity term. Professor Reddie will speak to the group about some of his current work, his experiences within the field of Black Theology, and his upcoming book Living Black Theology: Issues of Pedagogy, Mission, and Praxis (University of Oxford Press). After this, the session will open to a Q&A, so come prepared with some questions. Biography: Professor Anthony Reddie’s scholarship in Black theology has been informed by his doctorate in Education and Practical Theology, undertaken at the University of Birmingham with Professor John Hull. His consistent research interest has been the interface between Black Theology and decolonial/transformative education as a means of conscientization and empowerment. He is the author of numerous books, articles, and book chapters. His more recent books include Theologising Brexit: A Liberationist and Postcolonial Critique (Routledge, 2010), the republished Is God Colour-Blind? Insights from Black Theology for Christian Faith and Ministry (SPCK, 2020) and Intercultural Preaching [co-edited with Seidel Abel Boargenes and Pamela Searle], (Regent’s Park College, 2021). Professor Reddie is an A rated, Leading International Researcher with the South African National Research Foundation (NRF), who is also a recipient of the Archbishop of Canterbury's 2020 Lanfranc Award for 'exceptional and sustained contribution to Black theology In Britain and beyond.' Twitter @ race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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New views on cleared tissue and live dendrites

April 26, 2024, 1 p.m.

In my presentation, I like to show news on two topics. First, we are developing new microscopy tools for visualizing large-scale neural circuits in cleared brain tissue. A few years ago, we launched the mesoSPIM initiative, which disseminates open-source light-sheet microscopes that are highly suitable for imaging cleared mouse brains. We now published the next-generation 'Benchtop mesoSPIM', a more compact and improved version. I will present the special features and advantages of this new instrument. In addition, we have come up with an entirely new concept of microscope objectives for imaging large, cleared samples (the "Schmidt objective"). Inspired by telescopes from astronomy, we put together a spherical mirror and an aspheric correction plate to form a powerful objective design for high-resolution two-photon imaging of cleared specimen. The unique feature of this new design is that it performs well with any immersion medium, from air to oils with high refractive index. Finally, I like to touch upon our recent in vivo studies of dendritic dynamics in the neocortex during learning. Based on our experimental data we have developed a reinforcement learning model, in which certain types of errors can be matched to the dendritic changes that we observe in mice when they learn a new discrimination task. I will explain our model that could be useful to generate further specific hypotheses and that might provide a handle to more closely link neuronal dynamics to mathematical terms in learning theories. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY As an experimental neuroscientist with physics background my general research interest is to reveal principles of neural computation on the cellular and network level using electrophysiology and particularly optical methods. My lab has majorly contributed to advances in the field of two-photon microscopy for in vivo studies of neuronal circuit dynamics and glial function. Notable past achievements include (i) the quantitative analysis of Ca2+ signaling in dendrites and presynaptic terminals of neurons; (ii) the characterization of dendritic Ca2+ signaling in neocortical pyramidal cells in vivo using two-photon microscopy; (iii) the pioneering work of developing a miniaturized two-photon microscope for high-resolution imaging in freely moving rodents; (iv) the discovery of a specific label for astrocytes in vivo; (v) the seminal discovery of high resting motility of microglial cells in vivo; (vi) the development of novel laser scanning techniques for volumetric and high-speed measurements from large populations of cells in the neocortex; and most recently (vi) the application of genetically-encoded calcium indicators for longitudinal imaging studies in awake, behaving mice to reveal neocortical dynamics underlying short-term memory and learning. In recent years, my lab has expanded towards various brain regions, including hippocampus and thalamus, using new microscopy concepts, genetically encoded sensors, and optogenetic and chemogenetic tools to monitor and manipulate specific cellular circuit components. Our goal is to gain a mechanistic understanding of signal flow on the mesoscale, taking into account local microcircuit operation as well as principles of large-scale brain dynamics.

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Watching Amyloid Form: Structural Insights and New Opportunities for Intervention in Disease

April 26, 2024, 1 p.m.

Sheena Radford completed her BSc in Biochemistry at the University of Birmingham and her PhD at the University of Cambridge. After postdoctoral positions at the University of Oxford, she established her independent group at the University of Leeds as a lecturer, becoming Professor in 2000. She holds a Royal Society Research Professorship, and is Astbury Professor of Biophysics. Her main research group focuses on mechanisms of protein folding and misfolding in amyloid diseases, and other groups work on the outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, and extending the shelf-life of pharmaceuticals. Her awards include Fellowships of the Royal Society, the Academy of Medical Sciences and Royal Society of Biology, and Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to molecular biology.

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Title TBC

April 26, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Polynomial dynamical systems and reaction networks: persistence and global attractors

April 26, 2024, 2 p.m.

The mathematical analysis of global properties of polynomial dynamical systems can be very challenging (for example: the second part of Hilbert’s 16th problem about polynomial dynamical systems in 2D, or the analysis of chaotic dynamics in the Lorenz system). On the other hand, any dynamical system with polynomial right-hand side can essentially be regarded as a model of a reaction network. Key properties of reaction systems are closely related to fundamental results about global stability in classical thermodynamics. For example, the Global Attractor Conjecture can be regarded as a finite dimensional version of Boltzmann’s H-theorem. We will discuss some of these connections, as well as the introduction of toric differential inclusions as a tool for proving the Global Attractor Conjecture. We will also discuss some implications for the more general Persistence Conjecture (which says that solutions of weakly reversible systems cannot "go extinct"), as well as some applications to biochemical mechanisms that implement cellular homeostasis.

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Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Training Session (in-person)

April 26, 2024, 2 p.m.

The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and its significance in just three minutes to a non-specialist audience. This course helps you prepare for the competition and ensure that you have the best chance possible to represent Oxford nationally.

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Minimizing Quasiconvex Objective Functions

April 26, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

In this paper, we extend the results of Hjort and Pollard (2011) for random quasiconvex criterion functions. That is to say, for quasiconvex objective functions, we can relax the usual assumption of compactness of the parameter space. In addition, for quasiconvex objective functions, we can derive the limit distribution as argmins of the limit objective function without first establishing the root-n consistency of the estimator.

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Title TBC

April 26, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

Mental Capacity: Why it doesn't and shouldn't matter much in medical law and ethics

April 26, 2024, 3 p.m.

Medical law and ethics students are normally taught that mental capacity is a key concept. Simply put, if the patient has capacity then their autonomous decisions are respected, while if they lack capacity then decisions are made on their behalf based on what is in their best interests. This paper will challenge that supposition and claim that only in rare cases does it matter in terms of the outcome whether a patient has capacity or not. The paper will then turn to the ethical issues. While the importance of capacity is commonly said to rest in respect for autonomy it will argued that autonomy offers little help in complex legal cases. None of this is to say we should not be respecting the views of patients, but that autonomy and capacity are an insecure basis for doing so. Respondent: Dr Jonathan Pugh (Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford)

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Tackling the hidden costs of computational science: GREENER principles for environmentally sustainable research

April 26, 2024, 3:30 p.m.

From genetic studies and astrophysics simulations to statistical modelling and AI, scientific computing has enabled amazing discoveries and there is no doubt it will continue to do so. However, the corresponding environmental impact is a growing concern in light of the urgency of the climate crisis, so what can we all do about it? Tackling this issue and making it easier for scientists to engage with sustainable computing is what motivated the Green Algorithms project. Through the prism of the GREENER principles for environmentally sustainable science, we will discuss what we learned along the way, how to estimate the impact of our work and what levers scientists and institutions have to make their research more sustainable. We will also debate what hurdles exist and what is still needed moving forward.

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Friends of Oxford Cancer Public Event

April 26, 2024, 5 p.m.

To thank our donor community for their generous and ongoing support, Oxford Cancer is hosting a series of events for its supporters. These events will highlight and discuss some of the key areas of cancer research currently taking place across Oxford and provide supporters with an opportunity to put their questions to the experts. Cancer cases are increasing rapidly in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA); it is predicted that there will be 85% more cases by 2030. In this region, where 40% of the population is under 15 years old, cancer is unfortunately occurring more in younger people. In the second event of the series, Claire El Mouden, Programme Manager will give a talk on AI -REAL (Aggressive Infection-Related East Africa Lymphoma) a research collaboration that aims to assess the accuracy of new, low-cost ways of diagnosing Epstein Barr virus-associated lymphoma (cancer that begins in cells of the lymph system) in East African patients.

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Launch of 'Silver', by Rowan Ricardo Phillips

April 26, 2024, 5 p.m.

University College's Shakespeare Society presents a launch event for the new poetry collection, Silver, by Rowan Ricardo Phillips, who is a highly acclaimed, multi-award-winning poet, author, screenwriter, academic, journalist, and translator. His previous poetry collections include The Ground (FSG, 2012), Heaven (FSG, 2015), Living Weapon (FSG, 2020). He is also the author of the critical work When Blackness Rhymes with Blackness (a new edition of which is forthcoming from FSG) and the nonfiction book The Circuit: A Tennis Odyssey. Published by Faber, Silver is virtuosic in style. Sharing the dexterity of the legendary Argentinian footballer, Lionel Messi, who is conjured in its pages, the poems shape-shift through blank verse, elegy, terza rima and rap. Phillips is confident in his unconfidence: ‘Not the meaning,’ he writes, ‘but the meaningfulness of this mystery we call life’. The poems are luminous and dreamlike in their evocations of time and place, held in the light of a silvery moon that gives them their alluring strangeness and vibrancy. The launch will be hosted in the 10 Merton Street Lecture theatre, to be followed by drinks in the lobby, where Gulp Fiction will be organising sales of Silver. Register for free tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-univ-shakespeare-society-presents-silver-by-rowan-ricardo-phillips-tickets-860767989227.

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From the Maidan to Mariupol: Civil Resistance in Ukraine 1990-2024

April 26, 2024, 5 p.m.

CIVIL RESISTANCE AND POWER POLITICS RESEARCH PROJECT EVENT

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A Conversation with Author Sayaka Murata – Living, Writing and Transformation

April 26, 2024, 5 p.m.

Join us for a conversation with internationally acclaimed author Sayaka Murata, who will share some of her life experiences and influences, and explore vital questions and challenges regarding her writing and storytelling practices. We will address the idea of transformation throughout her work and the need to question what we consider “normal.” Pre-registration needed. In person-only. No recording available. Register here: https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/queens-translation-exchange/living-writing-transformation-a-conversation-with-sayaka-murata/e-mbrrjq Sayaka Murata is the author of many books, including Earthlings and Convenience Store Woman, winner of the Akutagawa Prize. Murata has been named a Freeman’s “Future of New Writing” author and a Vogue Japan Woman of the Year. Her story collection, Life Ceremony, was published by Granta in 2022. Her next novel, Vanishing World, will be published by Granta in 2025.

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Cloistered

April 26, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

In ‘Cloistered’ Catherine Coldstream tells the story of the twelve years she spent as a contemplative nun in the 1990s, from the unconditional trust of her first steps as a novice to the community crisis that led to her running away. Set in rural Northumberland, the memoir paints a picture of life in a traditional Carmelite monastery as it approaches the third millennium, with all the beauty and mystery as well as the hothouse atmosphere that evokes. In her talk she will be discussing how and why she came to write her memoir, and of the challenges she encountered along the way.

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Everest 1924: A Century in Review Symposium - Looking back on expeditions of Chomolungma: Mother Goddess of the Earth

April 27, 2024, 2 p.m.

*Please join us as we commemorate 100 years since Sandy Irvine and George Mallory's famous Everest expedition.* We are excited to present a group of speakers who are all impressive in their own right, but together will ensure a very special event to mark 100 years since the 1924 expedition to Mount Everest. *Rebecca Stevens MBE* Rebecca Stephens early career was in journalism, working first as reporter and then deputy editor of one of the Financial Times magazines. It was writing for the FT Weekend that she was assigned to Everest and discovered her passion for climbing. Rebecca was the first British woman to climb Everest and was awarded an MBE for her achievement. The following year she went on to become the first British woman to scale the Seven Summits, the highest mountain on each of the seven continents. Rebecca is an accomplished writer, drawing on her experiences of both business and the great outdoors. *Professor Julie Rak* Julie Rak (FRSC) holds the Henry Marshall Tory Chair in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta, Canada. Her latest book is False Summit: Gender in Mountaineering Nonfiction (2021). She has written many other books, collections and articles about nonfiction, popular culture and print culture. Much of her work addresses sexism and racism in mountaineering. *Dr Melanie Windridge* A Plasma physicist, writer and speaker with a taste for adventure. *Julie Summers* Julie Summers is an author, historical consultant, and writer, who is also Sandy Irvine's great niece. Chairing the panel discussion will be Dr Anna Saroldi (2019), who recently published a first case study on Translation and mountaineering. Merton College will also host an exhibition on Sandy Irvine which will be open throughout Trintiy Term. More details here: https://www.merton.ox.ac.uk/event/everest-1924-century-review-symposium Booking link for those without a Merton affiliation: https://form.jotform.com/240662427037353 Booking for those with a Merton affiliation: https://rb.gy/fzvooq A live stream and recording will be available for those who cannot attend in person.

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New research in the history of childhood by undergraduate and Masters students

April 29, 2024, 11 a.m.

*Georgina Close-Smith*, “We are sending letters to make you feel better”: The practice of citizenship among American elementary schoolchildren after 9/11 *Shereece Linton-Ramsay*, An examination of African-American girls’ experiences in a New York Reformatory, 1920-1930 *Kerry Stapleton*, Pupil resistance to the Ready to Learn behaviour system in British secondary schools, 2016-2023 *Daniel Surrey*, Changes to Secondary Education in Poole, 1965-1979 Link to join via Microsoft Teams: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_OWIxMTYzOTUtYzU3OC00MTdhLThkNWQtMmQwYTY2MDAxY2M5%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22cc95de1b-97f5-4f93-b4ba-fe68b852cf91%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%228a90033c-fe26-41a7-b094-f077e6448461%22%7d

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Regulation and immunotherapy responses of NK cells (and T cells) against tumors

April 29, 2024, noon

Most immunotherapy efforts aim to mobilize CD8+ T cells against cancer cells. Many tumors lack many neoantigens, and others are selected for partial or complete loss of MHC I, even before immunotherapy intervention. Checkpoint immunotherapy further exacerbates this problem as it preferentially amplifies CD8 cytotoxic effector cell activity, which targets MHC I presented tumor epitopes, imposing strong selection for loss of MHC I or other antigen presentation functions. Our work focuses on mobilizing NK cells and CD4 T cells to attack tumors. Innate immune system agonists and engineered cytokines synergize in eliciting such responses. I will discuss the impact and mechanisms underlying this approach, as examined in mouse cancer models, and its potential for preventing acquired resistance to checkpoint immunotherapy.

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Prostaglandin E2 hampers tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte expansion by collapsing interleukin-2 signalling and mitochondrial function

April 29, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Expansion of antigen-experienced CD8+ T cells is critical for the success of tumour infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in cancer patients. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a key regulator of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte functions by promoting their expansion and cytotoxic capability. Therefore, it is essential to comprehend mechanistic barriers to IL-2 sensing in the tumour microenvironment (TME) to implement strategies to reinvigorate IL-2 responsiveness and T cell antitumour responses. Starting from translational data from a Phase I trial on TIL-ACT in melanoma, we showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a known negative regulator of immune response in the TME, is present in high concentrations in patient tumour tissue and leads to impaired IL-2 sensing in human CD8+ TILs via the PGE2 receptors EP2/EP4. Mechanistically, PGE2 inhibits IL-2 sensing in TILs by downregulating the IL-2Rγc chain, resulting in defective assembly of IL-2Rβ/γc membrane dimers. This results in impaired IL-2/mTOR adaptation and PGC1α transcriptional repression to cause oxidative stress and ferroptotic cell death in tumour-reactive TILs. Inhibition of PGE2-EP2/EP4 signalling during TIL expansion for ACT resulted in increased IL-2 sensing, leading to enhanced proliferation of tumour-reactive TILs and enhanced tumour control once transferred in vivo. Our study reveals fundamental features underlying the TME-PGE2 mediated impairment of human TILs with therapeutic implications for cancer immunotherapy and cell-therapy, enabling the development of targeted strategies to enhance IL-2 sensing and amplifying IL-2 response in TILs, thereby promoting the expansion of effector T cells with enhanced therapeutic potential.

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TeachQuest: Designing and testing a ‘serious game’ to attract prospective teachers. Department of Education is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

April 29, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Recruiting sufficient numbers of high quality teachers is an international problem, with shortages especially acute in STEM-related subjects. The goal of our research programme is to develop scalable and effective research-informed interventions that can raise the interest and confidence of university students to consider teaching as a career. With the support of funding from the ESRC, we are developing and testing a motivation theory-informed ‘serious game’ called TeachQuest designed to engage STEM undergraduates in solving authentic challenges faced by first-year teachers. I will start the talk by highlighting the scale of the teacher recruitment crisis in England and present work from 2021-2023 that developed teacher recruitment interventions now implemented by the DfE. Next, I will outline how we are developing TeachQuest and discuss the challenges of integrating motivation theories with player engagement. Finally, I will present some of our early results from the testing of TeachQuest in the UK. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85842854046?pwd=dVpCemVmcWZFemdTV2ZhaE4xZXJhZz09

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From Outsiders to Heroes: Army Veterans, Patriotic Values and the Militarisation of Russia, 1991-2022

April 29, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Seminar 2 of Trinity Term's Sociology Seminar Series Please join either in person or online. For in-person attendees, the talk will be preceded by a light lunch at 12.15pm. Please email comms@sociology.ox.ac.uk with any questions or to receive the Microsoft Teams link. This paper investigates the aftermath of the Soviet-Afghan war (1979-1989) and two military operations in Chechnya (1994-1996, 1999-2000) and shows that they still have a significant impact on Russian society, influencing it in fundamental ways, from political and social processes down to the socialisation of private citizens. It contributes to answering two key research questions: in what ways do Russian citizens experience the shifts in social norms, conventions and public discourses brought home by former soldiers? And how exactly did the veterans of these wars become one of the powers supporting the regime? The paper shows how the interests of war veterans have been corresponding to, conflicting with, or existing in interplay with, the interests of the state during the last three decades, and how the wars made veterans continue building their self-identity in compliance with the narratives accepted by their comrades-in-arms. The paper is based on interviews with war veterans conducted in 2019-2021 and interpreted in terms of narrative analysis, and large amount of official governmental regulations.

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Applying precision public health concepts to HIV services: using routine health data to explore patterns of patient engagement with HIV care in South Africa

April 29, 2024, 1 p.m.

Claire Keene is a South African clinician with experience managing a large HIV and tuberculosis project for Médecins Sans Frontières in Khayelitsha, where she also managed the project’s initial COVID-19 response in 2020 and co-led the ARTIST trial, which showed that it is safe to recycle the tenofovir backbone in viraemic HIV patients switching to dolutegravir. Claire is completing her PhD at the University of Oxford as part of the Health Systems Collaborative – a group conducting health systems research in resource-limited settings. She is using routine healthcare data to examine patterns of patient engagement behaviour over time, in order to apply the concepts of precision public health to HIV service-delivery in South Africa.

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'Targeting DNA methyltransferases to chromatin: a tale of two N- terminal regions’

April 29, 2024, 1 p.m.

Your wild and precious life

April 29, 2024, 2 p.m.

Department Seminar: ECR Fire Talks

April 29, 2024, 2 p.m.

• Dr Jiedi Lei, Clinical Research fellow with TOPIC group, “Autism and Anxiety - Rethinking Assessment and Formulation through Strengths- Based Perspective” • Dr Daniel Schaefer, Postdoc with Prof Shelley McKeown Jones, "Beyond Intractability: Reducing Animosities and Creating a Procedural Framework for Nonviolent Conflict Management" • Dr Sophia Shatek, Postdoc in Attention, Brain & Cognitive Development group with Prof Gaia Scerif, “Attention and maths in the developing brain” • Dr Matan Mazor, All Souls College Junior Research Fellow, “Counterfactual self-simulation in perceiving absence and pretending not to know”

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Top Flight: How responsive are top earners to tax rates?

April 29, 2024, 3 p.m.

Using administrative data on the universe of UK taxpayers we study the responsiveness of top earners to tax rates. We leverage two large tax reforms affecting top earners – one in the UK and one in France – to determine the scale of both emigration and immigration responses. Our setting allows us to examine heterogeneity in response by income level and by ex ante probability of migration, for both natives and migrants. We develop a model that rationalises these results, and structurally estimate model parameters to infer the long run stock and migration elasticities. (coauthored with Cesar Poux, LSE III and Andy Summers, LSE Law)

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Intercolonial Health Cooperation in the Pacific Islands and the British Empire

April 29, 2024, 4 p.m.

The World Health Organization’s Western Pacific Region website invites its visitors to: “Imagine having to deliver health services to a population dispersed across dozens of atolls and island groups, covering a distance of up to 5,000 kilometers, with slow internet, extremely high operational costs as well as infrequent transport links.” One hundred years ago, the British colonial authorities faced the same set of problems in the Pacific. This seminar will discuss the initiatives to promote healthcare in the Pacific Islands in the first half of the twentieth century, with a focus on the British Empire. Colonial administrations in the Pacific Islands connected, cooperated, and competed with one another through an overarching scheme that centralised medical institutions. It was a process that, at various times, involved quarantine, education, disease-control, military medicine, and public health. Together, the centralised medical institutions inaugurated an imperial healthcare system in which constituents of the British Empire engaged in both hierarchical and lateral relationships. The history of the development of healthcare in the Pacific Islands is, therefore, a remarkable example of intercolonial, interimperial, and intraimperial relations.

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SIR CHARLES SHERRINGTON PRIZE LECTURE: Scents and Sensibility: Representations of Identity, Illusion and Value in Olfactory Cortex

April 29, 2024, 4 p.m.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Richard Axel is a Nobel laureate, a University Professor, and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Columbia University Medical Center, and a codirector of Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute. Dr. Axel obtained an AB from Columbia College and an MD from Johns Hopkins Medical School. In earlier studies, Dr. Axel and his colleagues, Michael Wigler and Saul Silverstein, developed gene transfer techniques that permit the introduction of virtually any gene into any cell. These studies not only allowed for a novel approach to isolate genes but also provided a detailed analysis of how they worked. At the same time, these experiments allowed for the production of an increasingly large number of clinically important proteins. These studies also led to the isolation and functional analysis of a gene for the lymphocyte surface protein, CD4, the cellular receptor for the AIDS virus, HIV. Professor Axel interested in the neurobiology of olfaction, or the sense of smell. He wants to understand the representation of olfactory information in the brain and the neural mechanisms that translate these representations into appropriate innate and learned behavioral responses. Working in the mouse and Drosophila, Axel and his team seek to genetically and physiologically dissect the sensory coding of odors. Their studies reveal that the anatomic organization and functional logic of olfactory circuits in Drosophila and mammals are remarkably similar, despite the organisms’ evolutionary distance from one another.

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An Evaluation of Protected Area Policies in the European Union

April 29, 2024, 4:05 p.m.

The European Union designates 26% of its landmass as a protected area, limiting economic development to favor biodiversity. This paper uses the staggered introduction of protected-area policies between 1985 and 2020 to study the selection of land for protection and the causal effect of protection on vegetation cover and nightlights. Our results reveal protection did not affect the outcomes in any meaningful way across four decades, all countries, protection cohorts, and a wide range of land and climate attributes. We conclude that European conservation efforts lack ambition because policymakers select land for protection not threatened by development.

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Hire Slow, Fire Fast: Human Resources Management in the Early Modern Princely Household

April 29, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

The United Nations and the Question of Palestine

April 29, 2024, 5 p.m.

The Dr Stanley Ho Memorial Lecture: 'Revisiting genetic determinism: evidence from large population cohorts'

April 29, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Developments in whole genome sequencing technologies have catalysed incredible progress in the diagnosis of rare disease and the discovery of novel disease-associated genes. However, large-scale sequencing of population cohorts has revealed that many healthy individuals carry the same disease-causing variants as patients. The extent of this incomplete penetrance in individuals not ascertained on the basis of a family history or clinical diagnosis is neither well understood nor widely appreciated. In this talk, Professor Caroline Wright, Professor of Genomic Medicine at the Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Exeter, will outline recent research into penetrance of different diseases across different populations, and discuss the broader implications of these findings for genomic screening. The talk will be followed by a drinks reception, all welcome. This is the Dr Stanley Ho Memorial Lecture organised by the Oxford Martin School and the Centre for Personalised Medicine.

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Oxford Political Review Issue 12 Launch Event: Utopia

April 29, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

The Oxford Political Review (OPR) is holding an event to celebrate the launch of its 12th print issue. Professor Duncan Bell (Cambridge) will give a keynote lecture entitled: "That Now Devastated Terrain? Utopianism in the Twentieth Century and Beyond"

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Investigation of structural variants in clinical whole genome sequencing data leading to new genetic diagnoses

April 30, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

For our next talk, in the BDI/CHG (gen)omics Seminar series we will be hearing from Prof Jenny Taylor, Programme Director; Dr Alistair Pagnamenta, Post-doctoral Researcher; Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford and Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre and Jing Yu, Senior Computational Geneticist, Centre of Excellence, Novo Nordisk Research Centre, Oxford. We’re delighted to Prof Taylor, Dr Pagnamenta and Jing Yu in what promises to be a great talk! Date: 30 April 2024 Time: 9:30 -10:30 am Location: Big Data Institute Seminar Room 0 Abstract: Clinical whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the diagnosis of rare genetic disorders. However, the diagnostic yield from large-scale programmes such as the Genomics England (GEL) 100,000 Genomes Project (100kGP) remains modest at approx. 25%, suggesting that more complex variant types, such as structural variants, and those residing outside the coding regions, need to be interrogated. We have used a range of whole genome sequencing data sets to explore such variants and highlight some of our results to date, including inversions, which have had a significant clinical impact for the families involved. Bio: Prof Jenny Taylor - Jenny Taylor is Professor of Translational Genomics at University of Oxford and Co-Theme Leader of the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre's Genomic Medicine Theme, a translational programme funded by the UK’s National Institute of Health Research based at the University of Oxford’s Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics. Jenny’s research focuses on the application of whole genome sequencing (WGS) to the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases and cancer, and investigation of novel disease genes emerging, applying a range of functional approaches. She is also involved in a major new initiative using genomics-led approaches to inform development of nucleic acid therapeutics for rare disease patients. Dr Alistair Pagnamenta: Alistair studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge and went on to do a PhD on mitochondrial disorders at UCL. Since 2010 he has worked for the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and has been involved with a wide range of projects including an MRC funded study into the genetics of musculoskeletal disorders. He has been involved in several disease-gene discovery projects, primarily using data from the WGS500/DDD studies and more recently from the 100kGP. Current interests include using WGS to detect inversions, translocations and cryptic splice variants. Jing Yu is the Senior Computational Geneticist, Centre of Excellence, Novo Nordisk Research Centre Oxford. Jing was trained in bacterial genetics but later moved on to work on human genetics using whole exome and whole genome sequencing. I led the whole genome sequencing analysis in the UK Inherited Retinal Dystrophy consortium and later embarked on the Genomics England 100k genomes project, to leverage its large scale whole genome sequencing data to find more diagnoses and molecular mechanisms underlying human disorders. And this is when I developed SVRare that helped with hundreds of diagnoses in Genomics England by looking at structural variants. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hybrid Option: Please note that these meetings are closed meetings and only open to members of the University of Oxford to encourage sharing of new and unpublished data. Please respect our speakers and do not share the link with anyone outside of the university. The aim of these seminars is to increase interaction between people working in Genomics across the University so we encourage in person attendance wherever possible. Microsoft Teams meeting – Meeting ID: 383 603 468 89 Passcode: q9DBxW ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you wish to know more or receive information related to trainings and events at BDI, please subscribe by emailing bdi-announce-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. You'll then receive an email from SYMPA and once you reply you'll be on the list!

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Gambling Disorder: what is it, and how should it be treated?

April 30, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Gambling disorder affects 0.4-2% of the population but has traditionally been largely overlooked in NHS settings. Times are changing: gambling disorder is now a national priority in the NHS long term plan, and around 15 regional treatment services have opened or are about to open. This session will cover the presentation of gambling disorder (symptoms, comorbidities, consequences), useful screening and assessment tools, and evidence-based treatment approaches. It will also highlight new NHS treatment services (e.g., how to refer), and will touch on the wider political and legislative contexts. https://zoom.us/j/95199401096?pwd=ancrZ0U1b0RNVmlKL0tQdTQ5SzhLUT09 Meeting ID: 951 9940 1096 Passcode: 937384

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Title TBC

April 30, 2024, 11 a.m.

Celebrating Diversity in Science and Medicine - exhibition and networking event at the Radcliffe Science Library

April 30, 2024, 11 a.m.

All staff and students from across MSD and MPLS (and beyond!) are invited to join us on April 30th at the new Radcliffe Science Library for an exhibition and networking event. You are invited to meet the Cambridge Black Medical Scientific Network (BMSN - https://www.linkedin.com/company/black-medical-and-scientific-network-bmsn/?originalSubdomain=uk) and view their exhibition, “Portraits of Black Female Scientists”. Representatives from the Oxford University Black Medics, OxFemTech among other local networks will be present to promote the support they offer for improving student wellbeing and inclusion. Additionally, a tour of the Radcliffe Science library with its new inclusive portraiture will be available on request. So please book a slot to enjoy the exhibition (and our new science library…) and to join us in learning more about the work of the BMSN and of groups here in Oxford. And, of course, to make new connections over food and drinks! Tea and coffee on offer all day, as well as lunch between 12 and 2. Open to all members of the University. In person at Radcliffe Science Library Breakout Space and Seminar Room. Date: 30th April Times: 11:00-12:00, 12:00-13:00, 13:00-14:00, 14:00-15:00, 15:00-16:00, 16:00-17:00

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Pedagogy Forum: Creative-Critical Pedagogy

April 30, 2024, 11 a.m.

‘You can dance, sing, mime, show pictures, play sounds etc etc … but you can’t speak or play or display words.’ What happened when the six students on the MSt C-Course "Silences: Henry James to Now" in Hilary Term 2024 were challenged to give their class presentations using any means of communication except words? Magnificently, they rose to the challenge, producing films, soundtracks, a computer game, tarot cards and an unclassifiable ten minutes involving eggshells, litter gathered from Port Meadow and calligraphy ink standing in for DDT. Their work opens up new ways of thinking about texts, new ways of communicating about texts, new ways of engaging in textual criticism and new ways of being in the classroom. This seminar showcases their creations.

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Forces in vessels: how mechanosensors initiate atherosclerosis in arteries

April 30, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'My public education experience: publishing my book 'A Guide to the Mental Health of Children and Young People: Q and A for Parents, Caregivers and Teachers'

April 30, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

Meinou Simmons is a CAMHS consultant with a special interest in education and is currently local Training Programme Director. She will discuss her learning from her recent experience of publishing her handbook on youth mental health to a broader audience of parents, caregivers, and teachers, which led to further public education activities. This is a hyrbid event, held in the Department of Psychiatry’s Seminar Room and online (Zoom). Please email shona.oleary@psych.ox.ac.uk to request the Zoom link.

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From Corpus to Canon. Editing and Translating Arabic, Persian, and Indic Literatures in the British Long Eighteenth Century

April 30, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

CSAE Research Workshop Week 2

April 30, 2024, 1 p.m.

Hybrid Oxford Stroke Seminar - Journal club: Management of subclinical atrial fibrillation

April 30, 2024, 1 p.m.

Journal club: Management of subclinical atrial fibrillation: 1. Healey JS et al for the ARTESIA Investigators. Apixaban for stroke prevention in subclincal atrial fibrillation. N Engl J Med 2023. 2. McIntyre WF et al. Direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in patients with device-detected atrial fibrillation: a study-level meta-analysis of the NOAH-AFNET 6 and ARTESiA Trials. Circulation 2023.

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Title TBC

April 30, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Handbook Series Launch – The Bloomsbury Handbooks of Crises and Transformative Leadership in Higher Education

April 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

This webinar will kick-off the launching of a new 4 volume international handbook series, entitled The Bloomsbury Handbooks of Crises and Transformative Leadership in Higher Education, to be published in Sprint 2024. The volume titles in the series include: • The Bloomsbury Handbook of Values and Ethical Change in Transformative Leadership in Higher Education • The Bloomsbury Handbook on Context and Transformative Leadership in Higher Education • The Bloomsbury Handbook on Diversity, Crises and Transformative Leadership in Higher Education • The Bloomsbury Handbook of Ethics of Care in Transformative Leadership in Higher Education Global crises, unrelenting change, and disruptions (such as pandemics, financial crises, environmental crises, technological innovations, geopolitical events, and others) have induced both challenges and opportunities for institutions of higher education globally, while threatening the sustainability of many. In its intersections with the rise of protectionism, cultural chauvinism, authoritarianism and demagoguery, the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated–or at least rendered more visible–a global climate in which culture wars infiltrated campuses, as well as the very discourse of higher learning. Proliferating scepticism about the value of science and expertise more broadly appears to signal a weakening of trust in the role of universities as transformative agents of positive social and human development. As a result of the complex contextual situatedness of these institutions, responses to these crises, disruptions, and uncertainties have often taken quite different approaches. It is the lessons and reflections on the why and how to lead HEIs through these multiple, intersecting and ongoing crises and change that informs the development of the chapters within this handbook series. With over 120-chapter authors from six continents, these volumes will deepen the readers understanding of the multiple and intersecting crises and change issues, within diverse local and global geopolitical, social, economic and cultural contexts that leaders in higher education institutions (HEIs) needed to handle. In creating new policies, programs and pedagogical approaches, leaders in higher education have had to work critically, creatively and collaboratively to identify opportunities and overcome obstacles related to values, ethics, learning, engagement, inclusion, diversity, research, technology, accountability, partnership development, and sustainability, amongst others. Through their leadership and transformative change initiatives, many leaders and senior administrative teams have found or created new opportunities and are now looking at the valuable lessons learned from their experiences under extreme conditions, and how these might inform the post-pandemic, post-change or post-crisis directions for their university.

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The Early Reception of the Sun Machine

April 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

"Politics and Persecution: Pashto, Pashtun and Pashtunistan" - Autobiography of Samad Khan Achakzai

April 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

A towering figure of the Indian subcontinent's independence movement, Abdul Samad Khan Achakzai's political career spanned the colonial and post-colonial eras. His progressive politics were national-democratic, anti-imperialist and anti-feudal. He advocated for democracy, civil rights and the rule of law and envisioned a single Pashtun province, which would incorporate all the contiguous Pashtun-inhabited areas east of the Durand Line with Pashto as the working language and medium of instruction. Altogether, he was sentenced to imprisonment for 40 of his 66 year life, a time he used to gain academic credentials and pen most of this autobiography. He is reverentially remembered as "Khan Shaheed" - the Martyr Khan. Ayaz Khan Achakzai is a public policy expert and development economics practitioner. His work in international development includes stints at the World Bank, United Nations, private consulting and non-profit organizations. He was educated at Colby College, Oxford University and Princeton University. Ayaz is the co-translator and editor of My Life and Times.

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Psychiatrists’ experiences and opinions of generative artificial intelligence in mental healthcare: An online mixed methods survey

April 30, 2024, 3 p.m.

Following the launch of ChatGPT in November 2022, interest in large language model (LLM)-powered chatbots has surged with increasing focus on the clinical potential of these tools. Missing from this discussion, however, are the perspectives of physicians. The current study aimed to explore psychiatrists’ experiences and opinions on this new generation of chatbots in mental health care. An online survey including both quantitative and qualitative responses was distributed to a non-probability sample of psychiatrists affiliated with the American Psychiatric Association. Findings revealed 44 % of psychiatrists had used OpenAI's ChatGPT-3.5 and 33 % had used GPT-4.0 “to assist with answering clinical questions.” Administrative tasks were cited as a major benefit of these tools: 70 % somewhat agreed/agreed “documentation will be/is more efficient”. Three in four psychiatrists (75 %) somewhat agreed/agreed “the majority of their patients will consult these tools before first seeing a doctor”. Nine in ten somewhat agreed/agreed that clinicians need more support/training in understanding these tools. Open-ended responses reflected these opinions but respondents also expressed divergent opinions on the value of generative AI in clinical practice, including its impact on the future of the profession.

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OCRN Annual Lecture: A mosaic of solutions for frontline communities: People-centered, operationally relevant ways to address adverse climate change impacts

April 30, 2024, 4 p.m.

As climate change impacts unfold rapidly worldwide, people-centered and operationally relevant ways to support frontline communities become increasingly important. Saleemul Huq worked tirelessly to this aim, and for those who had the privilege of working with him in Bangladesh, in Least Developed Countries, in academia and with civil society, and with governments, we have benefitted from his legacy. Saleemul and many gathered here today and across the world contributed to progress under the UNFCCC process to establish funding arrangements including a fund to address adverse climate change impacts. As the new fund takes shape and a high level dialogue will make recommendations on funding arrangements, what directions are needed to address needs and provide solutions? This event is held in memory of Saleemul Huq OBE (1952 - 2023), an acclaimed climate change researcher and campaigner who worked tirelessly to centre the needs of frontline communities. Saleemul was the director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh and a "titan of the climate movement". Speaker bio: Dr Koko Warner is the Director of the International Organization for Migration’s Global Data Institute. Prior to this, Koko worked in the United Nations for over 16 years on climate change and migration, and climate risk management. Koko supervises the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) workstreams on climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and risk policy in the adaptation division.

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Combining qualitative and small-n methodologies in impact evaluation designs: theoretical aspects and lessons from experience - Methods in Social Policy and Intervention Research

April 30, 2024, 4 p.m.

This addresses the application of small-n methodologies, mostly Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Process Tracing, in policy and programme evaluation. It will provide an overview of possible methodological options and suggest criteria for appropriate choice (e.g. evaluation questions) and combination of options. More specifically, it will address the benefits brought by QCA and Process Tracing, and their variants. as well as their challenges and limitations. Booking is required for people outside of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI). The registration form will be available soon. DSPI members do not need to register

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A Diplomatic Conspiracy? The Fall of Thomas Cromwell Revisited

April 30, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Africa- Oxford Nature Networking Event

April 30, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

If you work on any aspect of Nature Recovery or Biodiversity Conservation in Africa, come along, meet others working in this sector, find out about their research and forge new collaborations.

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Business of the State: Why State Ownership Matters for Resource Governance

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

https://www.lac.ox.ac.uk/event/business-of-the-state-why-state-ownership-matters-for-resource-governance

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Unfulfilled Dreams: China’s 'Liberal' Communist Party Intellectuals’ Struggle for Democracy from the 1930s to the 2000s

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Amid the Sino-Japanese and civil wars in the 1930s and 1940s, many patriotic young intellectuals joined the Chinese Communist Party out of a fervent desire to 'save the nation'. Attracted by its promises of freedom, democracy and equality, these underground party members braved arrest, torture and prison under the Nationalist government to fight for a communist utopia. After 1949, following an initial period of euphoria, they found themselves painfully struggling between their twin goals of democracy and revolution under the Mao regime. Towards the end of their lives however, a group remained committed to their ideals and openly called for democratic reforms, becoming known as the 'democrats within the party'. This talk explores the intellectual journey of these party intellectuals, who struggled in a dynamic tension throughout their lives between their longing for democracy and their devotion to the Communist revolution, liberal and Marxist-Leninist values, and between humanity and class-conscious party spirit. Having interviewed them and examined their writings, diaries and memoirs, Dr Verna Yu attempts to decipher what attracted these young intellectuals to the Communist revolution in the pre-1949 era, what contributed towards their unquestioning faith in the party in the Mao era and what triggered their intellectual 'awakening' in the post-Mao era. The examination of their mental conflicts and thought transformation, dissent and collaboration in the party has contributed towards our understanding of 20th century Chinese intellectuals and Chinese contemporary history. Dr Verna Yu is Departmental Lecturer in Modern Chinese Studies at the University of Oxford and Research Associate of the China Institute at SOAS, University of London. She researches and teaches the history and politics of modern and contemporary China. She has a PhD degree in history from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her doctoral research was focused on the intellectual history of contemporary China, and in particular, how young Chinese intellectuals were attracted to the idea of a Communist Utopia in the 1930s and 1940s and their pursuit of a democratic China from the pre-1949 era to the post-Mao era. Prior to academia, she was an award-winning journalist whose works on human rights, civil society and Chinese politics have been published widely in the international press, primarily The Guardian and the South China Morning Post, and also in the Diplomat and New York Times among other international publications. Her two-decade China coverage has been recognised through 10 prestigious press awards, including seven Human Rights Press Awards and three Society of Publishers in Asia Editorial Awards (SOPA) awards.

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Howard Covington on AI & Climate Change - Adrian Fernando Memorial Lecture

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Join us for the 7th Adrian Fernando Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, 30 April 2024, featuring Howard Covington as the keynote speaker. AI and Climate Change 17.00 – 18.10 BST: Lecture and Q&A 18.10 – 19.10 BST: Reception AI will accelerate innovation in clean energy systems and environmental monitoring and protection. It will thus make for a faster energy transition and help preserve biodiversity. But AI and climate change are also prompting domestic and international political changes that could slow the energy transition in this critical decade. Moreover, both AI and the climate are evolving very fast. By the time the world has net zero in sight, we will not only have disrupted the climate and nature, but we may have among us an abundance of human-level or super-intelligent data centres. This abundance may usher in an era of economic plenty that makes it easier to deal with climate disruption, or it could generate more disruption by increasing inequality, reducing social cohesion, and possibly limiting human development. Humanity has set itself an epoch-defining challenge to rise to. Howard Covington will try to put into context some of the themes around AI and climate change that will shape our immediate future. Howard Covington is a Cambridge graduate in physics and maths. He has been a director of SG Warburg, European chief executive of Wasserstein Perella, a co-founder and chief executive of New Star Asset Management, a trustee of the Science Museum, chair of the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, founding chair of The Alan Turing Institute, chair of the Scotia Group, chair of ClientEarth, and an advisory board member of the University of Oxford’s Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment. Howard is a fellow of the Institute of Physics and an honorary fellow of the Isaac Newton Institute and The Alan Turing Institute.

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Restoring the rule of law in Poland: a particular or a universal challenge?

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

A new Polish government is trying to restore the rule of law, after eight years in which the EU identified major threats to it under governments of the populist Law and Justice (PiS) party. The rule of law crisis in Poland has posed a challenge for the entire European Union, undermining its fundamental principles and values. Can the EU effectively defend itself against such threats? Which path should be chosen to restore the rule of law: revolution or evolution? These questions will be addressed by Dr Marek Safjan, a former president of Poland’s Constitutional Court and a judge on the European Court of Justice from 2009 until earlier this year.

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Oxford Energy Seminar Series – Week 2 TT24: Sustainable Energy in Refugee Camps: Technologies, Politics, and Governance

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Energy is everywhere in refugee camps: in the homes, businesses, and community spaces of refugees. However, this topic is rarely discussed in academic or practitioner contexts. To understand more about this important issue, this seminar will present ethnographic research from the journal article on the ‘Secret Life of Energy in Refugee Camps’, as well as outlining findings from the ‘State of the Humanitarian Energy Sector’ (SOHES) report by the Global Platform for Action on Sustainable Energy in Displacement Settings (GPA), hosted by the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR).

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Blavatnik Book Talks: J L Austin — Philosopher and D-Day Intelligence officer

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

This event is an open discussion of Dr Rowe’s recent and authoritative new biography of J L Austin— a fascinating figure, who was both one of the leading philosophers of the 20th Century, and as revealed in Rowe’s book, also a crucial figure in the history of military intelligence, responsible for the intelligence behind the D-Day landings of 1944. This book – the first biography of Austin – throws new light on his personality, relationships, philosophical development, and tragically premature death; and emphasizes his importance as a senior Intelligence officer in World War Two, the inventor of speech-act theory, and the leader of Oxford Ordinary Language Philosophy 1945-60. The event is chaired by Thomas Simpson, Associate Professor of Philosophy & Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government.

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Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2024 - Lecture 1 - Witchcraft, "Witch Camps", and Social Life in Northern Ghana

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Lecture 1 of the Evans-Pritchard Lecture series Witchcraft, "Witch Camps", and Social Life in Northern Ghana All are welcome to attend in person or via the Teams ID and password below: Meeting ID: 318 331 790 674 Passcode: LEecHc

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Climate Change News Audiences: Analysis of News Use and Attitudes

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

This year may go down as the hottest ever recorded as also one with an alarming increase in the frequency and severity of a wide range of climate change induced extreme weather events. This gives us a stark warning of climate change impacts we can expect in the future. Scientists have urged world governments to urgently make use of one last window of opportunity to shift course. However, considering the scale of this challenge, the responsibility extends to all key stakeholders, including the news media. A substantial body of empirical evidence has identified that news media are crucial in shaping policy agendas, fostering public discourse, and motivating individuals to take pro-environmental actions. Therefore, drawing from data from the UK, USA, France, Germany, Japan, Brazil, India, and Pakistan, collected through an online survey in 2023, this study provides an in-depth understanding of climate news consumption habits along with public opinion on the health impacts of climate change, public support for and coverage of direct-action protests, and climate justice.

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Women and Ukraine’s Economies of War and Peace

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Addressing a range of contemporary and historical conflicts and daily struggles, this series of talks will explore how violence remains integral to the global political economy, with lasting effects on gendered hierarchies which often extend far beyond immediate war zones. 

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Marriage and the Intergenerational Mobility of Women: Evidence from Marriage Certificates 1850-1920

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

2024 George Rousseau lecture: Images of Jews' Economic Roles from the Enlightenment to the French Revolution

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

France was the first country in Europe to grant Jews full citizenship rights in 1790-91. Why emancipation occurred then and there is a question that historians continue to grapple with. Many have looked for an answer in the relative positive views of the Jewish merchants of Iberian descent who lived in the Southwest of France among eighteenth-century Enlightenment thinkers. Starting from a new reading of a famous passage by Montesquieu, the talk will challenge this prevailing interpretation and show that even the most ardent advocates of Jewish emancipation regarded any association between Jews and commerce or finance with great suspicion. In so doing, it will contend with the widespread notion according to which economic utility paved (and, more generally, can pave) the way for political and human rights. *Francesca Trivellato* is the Andrew W Mellon Professor at the School for Historical Studies of the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton. A leading historian of early modern Italy and continental Europe, Trivellato has made significant and ground-breaking contributions to our understanding of the organization and culture of the marketplace in the pre-industrial world. Trivellato’s original and imaginative research has revitalized the study of early economic history, and her influential work on cross-cultural trade intersects the fields of European, Jewish, Mediterranean, and global history, religion, and capitalism. Admission is free but please book your tickets in advance.

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Online Lecture: 'Shifting Allegiances: The Election of Latino Republicans to US Congress and State Legislatures'

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Since 2018, we have seen a growth of Latino Republicans running for and winning in both state and federal United States Elections in places that one would not expect. In this month's Balliol Online Lecture, Professor Jason Casellas (John G Winant Visiting Fellow in American Government 2023-24) will explain who they are, where they are running, who is winning, and their impact once in office. Jason Casellas is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston specialising in American politics, with specific research and teaching interests in Latino politics, legislative politics, and state and local politics. He is the author of Latino Representation in State Houses and Congress (New York: Cambridge University Press). He is the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, including a Princeton Fellowship, an American Political Science Association Fellowship, a Ford Motor Company Fellowship, the Samuel DuBois Cook Postdoctoral Fellowship at Duke University, and a United States Studies Centre Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Sydney (Australia).

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Special Lecture: Time to Get Ready: Resistance Through My Lens

April 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Educator, organiser and activist Maria Varela explores her work during the Civil Rights Movement, focussing particularly on her photographic archive. In discussing her images, Maria reflects on narratives of the Civil Rights Movement and how her photographs and experiences challenge that memory. This talk is part of the event programming for the exhibition, Time to Get Ready: Maria Varela and the Civil Rights Movement. In 1963, Maria Varela travelled to Atlanta, Georgia to join the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee as an office worker. However, within three weeks she was assigned to work in dangerous Selma, Alabama as a literacy program worker. For the next four and a half years, Varela would work as an educator, organiser, and writer in the deep South. It was not until 1966 that, dissatisfied with representations of Black people in the Movement, Varela would pick up a camera. Through her lens, she captured images of marches, speeches, and protests. But primarily she captured the hard work that went into sustaining the everyday organizing to build the Movement from the bottom up – including voter drives, vegetable co-operatives, and community activism around jobs, education, housing and segregation of public institutions. From events such as the Meredith March Against Fear, to profiling leaders such as Fannie Lou Hamer, Varela’s photography offers an important perspective on one of the most significant periods of reckoning in American history. Maria Varela’s photography will be exhibited at The Barn Gallery, St John’s College (22 St Giles') from Monday 29 April to Saturday 18 May 2024. There will be an opening wine reception at The Barn Gallery on 29 April. This exhibition is generously supported by: St John’s College, the Rothermere American Institute, Christ Church College, the British Association of American Studies, the Oxford Festival of the Arts, and the National Museum of Mexican Art.

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Early Modern Literature Graduate Forum

April 30, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Bangladesh and the Changing International Order

April 30, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Dr Abul Kalam Abdul Momen (born 23 August 1947), known as AK Abdul Momen, is a Bangladeshi economist, diplomat, and politician who served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of Bangladesh from January 2019 to January 2024. He served as Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to the United Nations from August 2009 until October 2015. He was elected a member of Jatiya Sangsad (Bangladesh Parliament) from the Sylhet-1 constituency at the 2018 general elections. Following his election, he was appointed the minister of foreign affairs by the Honourable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina. Now serving as the Chairman on the Standing Committee on Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Bangladesh National Parliament.

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The T. J. Clark Seminar – Poetry & Painting

April 30, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

The next seminar in the series will take place at 5.30 pm on Tuesday 30th April 2024 in The Pusey Room at Keble. The topic will be announced soon on this webpage: https://www.keble.ox.ac.uk/teaching-research/poetry-at-keble/poetry-painting/ Free entry, all welcome, no tickets or booking required. Enquiries: please contact Matthew Bevis.

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Sanjaya Lall Visiting Professor

April 30, 2024, 7 p.m.

Inclusive Gaming Conference

May 1, 2024, 8:30 a.m.

The Inclusive Gaming Conference is a one-day conference which brings together students, academics, and industry professionals to discuss research initiatives, works in progress, and future directions for explorations of inclusive gaming. The day will consist of a series of roundtable discussions, keynote speakers, diverse presentations, and interactive gaming experiences. This event is jointly run by the Oxford Games & Technologies Group and the Cheng Kar Shun Digital Hub at Jesus College Oxford. The delegate rate includes coffee breaks and lunch.

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Open scholarship: introduction to open science framework at Oxford

May 1, 2024, 10 a.m.

Despite its name, the Open Science Framework (OSF) is an online tool for managing academic projects in any discipline. Rather than trying to reinvent tools and systems that scholars already use, OSF integrates with a growing list of existing services and provides a single place where researchers can see and manage all the components that make up their project - including files, software, data and publications. This course will introduce you to the Open Science Framework at Oxford. It will explain how to get access to OSF using your Oxford SSO, give an overview of what it can and cannot do, and provide some examples of how it can be used with other research services. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Religion and Rise and Fall of Islamic Science

May 1, 2024, 11 a.m.

This paper documents a decline in scientific output in the medieval Islamic world and empirically links the decline to the political empowerment of religious leaders. A contraction in secular bureaucratic structures strengthened conservative religious elites who altered institutions to discourage the study of topics that undermined their societal control. The decline geographically tracks these institutional changes from east to west, providing additional evidence that rent-seeking religious leaders contributed to the decline of Islamic science.

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How Regulation Can Revive China’s Sagging Economy?

May 1, 2024, noon

China’s economy is at a crossroads, facing its most significant challenges in recent memory. Amidst this economic turmoil, a fierce debate has emerged among leading experts: is the current economic downturn a result of ingrained structural issues, excessive state intervention, or escalating geopolitical tensions? In this book talk, Professor Angela Zhang will offer a fresh perspective, steering the conversation towards the distinct model of China’s regulatory governance. Drawing insights from her newly released book, High Wire: How China Regulates Big Tech and Governs Its Economy, Professor Zhang will introduce the ‘Dynamic Pyramid Model’ to demystify the complexity in Chinese regulation and its enormous impact on the Chinese economy. Through this lens, she will explain the consistent regulatory pattern in some of the biggest policy challenges China has faced in recent years, including tech regulation, the covid-19 pandemic control, the energy crisis in 2021, the ongoing property crack down and China’s demographic crisis. This discussion aims to shed light on the political logic underpinning China’s regulatory policies, while also identifying potential pathways toward economic revival. Angela Zhang is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Hong Kong and Director of the Philip K. H. Wong Center for Chinese Law.

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The Grass is Not Always Greener: The Effects of Local Labour Market Information on Search and Employment

May 1, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

We examine how the provision of local labour market information shapes search and employment for job seekers in India. We randomly assign a group of job seekers to receive truthful information about the number and attributes of either job postings, applicants, or both for their preferred city and occupation on an online job portal. Treated respondents receiving any local labour market information are 10.2% more likely to be employed than control respondents seven months later. This overall effect varies considerably by baseline employment status and labour market beliefs. Among the initially employed, treated respondents are less likely to search off the portal, but are more likely to be employed because they remain in their (baseline) jobs. In contrast, among the initially unemployed, treated respondents are more likely to search across all methods, but only those with less optimistic labour market beliefs accept offers and are more likely to be employed. Our results are consistent with respondents inferring poor job prospects from the information treatments and show how access to local labour market information can reduce frictional unemployment. Written with A. Nilesh Fernando (University of Notre Dame)

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AI in Law and Economics

May 1, 2024, 1 p.m.

Dr George Barker member of Wolfson College Oxford University, Honorary Associate Professor at the Australian National University. Doctorate in Economics from Oxford University, and a Bachelor of Laws and Master of Economics (Hons). Director of the Centre for Law and Economics at Australian National University (ANU) from 1997-2017. Olin Fellow in Law and Economics at Cornell University in 2000, and Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics (LSE) (2015-2018); the Centre for Law and Economics at University College London (2010-2015); and Oxford University 2008. Founding Member of the Editorial Board of the European Journal of Law and Economics. Authored books, and articles and given expert testimony on the economics of law including: competition law, trade law (the Effects of China joining the WTO Cambridge University Press 2003), corporations and labour law (the economics of trade unions), intellectual property law (especially copyright), taxation law and environmental law; and the economics of industry regulation, including the digital economy, communications, internet, energy, transport, mining, agriculture, insurance, finance, pharmaceutical, software, and media industries; and on the economic role of government, the economics of public policy, public finance, public sector management, social services (education, health, and welfare) and income distribution. Provides expert economic testimony before courts, ministers, Parliaments and regulatory agencies in Europe, North America and Asia Pacific, and in arbitration disputes in the Hague. His work has been cited in the UK House of Lords, by the High Court of England and Wales and by the European Commission. Elected Honorary Fellow of the Law and Economics Association of NZ. Past President of the Australian Law and Economics Association, a Founder and Past President of the Law and Economics Association of New Zealand. Chief Analyst and Economic Advisor at the NZ Treasury 1984-1997. Member of the Governing Board of Wolfson College, Oxford University from 1990 – 1992, Board member of LECG Asia-Pacific Ltd (1997-2005), Celtic Pacific Ltd, and Upstart Investments Ltd (1999-2003), KEA Global and past Chairman of KEA Australia (2001-2010).

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'Eating to conserve: harnessing seafood sustainability to save threatened sharks' with Dr Divya Karnad

May 1, 2024, 1 p.m.

The historical philosophy of wildlife conservation suggests that if humans and wildlife are separated, then wildlife will thrive. Yet megadiverse countries, like India, which are highly populated, seem to contradict this idea. While wildlife is imperilled in India, research is beginning to show that a physical and mental (perceived) disconnect from nature, such as through urbanisation, has insidious, deep-rooted and large-scale detrimental impacts on wildlife populations. Relative to this disconnect, the impacts of direct resource extraction by localised resource-dependent communities might be considered as marginal. In this context, Dr Karnad's research examines wildlife conservation in India's marine realm. Specifically she examines how cultivating a closer relationship with nature through food can help achieve wildlife conservation goals. To this end, she focuses on how attention to detail when purchasing and eating seafood ingredients can produce the kinds of actions that we celebrate in wildlife conservation. In this talk, Dr Divya Karnad, will dwell on her experience co-founding a sustainable seafood initiative, InSeason Fish, and how talking to diverse groups of people, about topics other than wildlife, can help bridge the gap between the economy and the conservation of threatened sharks in India.

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Press under pressure: Argentina’s multi-faceted journalism crises

May 1, 2024, 1 p.m.

Hugo Alconada Mon is an Argentinian journalist specialised in Investigative Journalism about corruption in politics, money laundering and corporate fraud. He’s been woking for more than 20 years in La Nación, one of Argentina media outlet leaders, and he is part of the newspapers’ main editor team since 2009. Currently, he also writes for the Spanish journal El País. He is a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and worked on the Panama Papers.

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Session 2: How to write an equality impact assessment for Agile Sprints (online webinar)

May 1, 2024, 1 p.m.

Learn how equality impact assessments (EIAs) can enhance your interdisciplinary policy-led research by helping you integrate diversity and inclusion considerations in your research project. This is workshop is open to: Oxford University researchers planning to develop an Agile Sprint; Oxford University researchers working on other UKRI-funded interdisciplinary research projects who need to conduct an EIA; research-related staff within the University supporting researchers with EIAs; previous Agile researchers interested in how an EIA might be relevant to their future research projects. “An equality impact assessment (EIA) is an evidence-based approach designed to help organisations ensure that their policies, practices, events and decision-making processes are fair and do not present barriers to participation or disadvantage any protected groups from participation.” -NERC UKRI EIAs offer an opportunity to integrate diversity and inclusion considerations throughout your research. While EIAs are not a legal requirement, they are increasingly recommended by funders as facilitation and evidence of Public Sector Equality Duty. EIAs were recently introduced in Agile, and this workshop will use a case study to demonstrate how to design and use an EIA in Sprints. By the end of this workshop, you will understand: Agile’s ambitions for diversity and inclusion in Sprint research Why EIAs matter to Sprint research How to conduct an effective EIA for an Agile Sprint and use it through the project to strengthen the research Book your place on the workshop using the links provided. If you need to cancel your place, please do so no later than 48 hours before the workshop. By booking on this workshop, you have agreed to the externally facing use of the recording. Book another session, by viewing the series event page. Participation: Please note you will be expected to actively participate, which includes joining discussion, listening, asking questions, and contributing to activities.

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Title TBC

May 1, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Sniffing out circuit changes during sleep

May 1, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

Financial regulation and supervision in a complex world: how can we green the financial system for nature?

May 1, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

Over the past decade, financial regulation and supervision have been increasingly seen as potential solutions to climate change and biodiversity loss. Yet, they are at best a necessary but not sufficient condition for action. This paper explores how science and modelling have been used within financial regulation and supervision to date - to motivate and inform action - and analyses the limitations of current approaches and the potential negative repercussions for finance and society. With the launch of the Task-Force on Nature-related disclosures in September 2023, there is increasing pressure that these new financial frameworks incorporate nature and biodiversity. Yet this brings even greater risk assessment challenges. We present results from our recent work with the Network for Greening the Financial System (NGFS) and the UK financial sector that tries to capture some of the lessons from complex systems analysis to inform integrated nature-climate scenario analyses for financial institutions. We draw lessons on the needs from both the scientific and finance communities to generate more decision-relevant evidence and to use this appropriately within decisions. About the speaker Dr Nicola Ranger is Director of the Resilient Planet Finance Lab at the University of Oxford, Executive Director of the Oxford Martin Systemic Resilience Programme and leads the Resilience and Development Group of the Environmental Change Institute. She is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for New Economic Thinking of the Oxford Martin School. She brings 20 years' expertise in risk, analytics, economics, finance and fiscal policy as a practitioner and researcher across industry, government, IFIs and academia. She works with governments, Central Banks, regulators, financial institutions and international organisations to help align policy and finance with resilience and sustainability goals. She is a Visiting Academic at the Bank of England, a member of the European Commission’s High Level Expect Group on Sustainable Finance in Low and Middle Income Economies and a member of the UK’s Green Technical Advisory Group. Nicola is also co-Chair of the Resilient Planet Data Hub, an international public-private partnership with the UN and Insurance Development Forum providing open data and analytics on climate and nature. Nicola joined Oxford from the World Bank’s Finance, Competitiveness and Innovation Global Practice, where she worked with financial institutions, Ministries of Finance, Central Banks and regional institutions to strengthen financial resilience and implement systems and processes to strengthen national and global resilience to shocks and crises. Prior to this, she held senior roles at the UK Department for International Development, the London School of Economics and Political Science, HM Treasury, Risk Management Solutions and Defra. Nicola completed her postdoctoral research in climate economics and policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science and holds a doctorate in Atmospheric Physics from Imperial College London. Nicola has written more than 30 book chapters and peer-reviewed articles and contributed to major reports including the UK National Climate Change Risk Assessment, the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change, the World Development Report and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports.

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Oxford Technology & Security Nexus — China's AI Posture and Capabilities

May 1, 2024, 3 p.m.

Note that we're back in the Chester Room this week. This week, Sihao Huang will be speaking about China’s current “State of AI” and advanced technology posture. About the speaker: Sihao Huang is a DPhil student at DPIR studying AI governance and technology policy. He is a Marshall Scholar, a Technology Security Fellow at RAND, and an external advisor at UK DSIT. Prior to Oxford, he researched China's semiconductor industrial policy in Beijing as a Schwarzman Scholar. Sihao also founded a startup in the aerospace industry and holds a B.S. in Physics and Electrical Engineering from MIT.

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Ecology and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

May 1, 2024, 5 p.m.

Sufism in Al-Sanusi’s Theological Works

May 1, 2024, 5 p.m.

The Promise and Perils of China’s Regulation of Artificial Intelligence

May 1, 2024, 5 p.m.

In recent years, China has emerged as a pioneer in formulating some of the world’s earliest and most comprehensive rules concerning algorithms, deepfakes, and generative artificial intelligence services. This proactive approach has led many to view China as a global frontrunner in AI regulation, while also raising concerns that Beijing’s approach may hinder innovation. In this talk, Professor Zhang will challenge this widely-held perception, revealing a more intricate and strategic regulatory landscape in China. Drawing upon insights from her newly released book, “High Wire: How China Regulates Big Tech and Governs Its Economy,” Professor Zhang will explore the multifaceted nature of China’s institutional dynamics and their impact on AI regulation. She will also provide an in-depth analysis of the Chinese government’s nuanced strategy, which leverages the expressive power of the law to strategically enable the growth of its AI industry. Additionally, she will discuss the implications of China’s approach to AI enforcement for the domestic industry, the global tech rivalry, and the prospects for international cooperation. Join us for this engaging and informative talk as we delve into the dynamic complexities of China’s AI regulatory landscape and its broader implications for the future of AI governance. Angela Zhang is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Hong Kong and Director of the Philip K. H. Wong Center for Chinese Law. Widely recognized as a leading authority on China’s tech regulation, Angela has written extensively on this topic. She is the author of “Chinese Antitrust Exceptionalism: How the Rise of China Challenges Global Regulation” (Oxford, 2021), which was named one of the Best Political Economy Books of 2021 by ProMarket. Angela’s second book, “High Wire: How China Regulates Big Tech and Governs Its Economy,” was released by Oxford University Press in March 2024. In fall 2024, Angela will join the University of Southern California as a Professor of Law. For more information, please visit her website at AngelaZhang.net, and follow her on Twitter @AngelaZhangHK. High Wire: How China Regulates Big Tech and Governs Its Economy, available here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/high-wire-9780197682258?cc=us&lang=en (use promotion code ALAUTHC4 to get 30% off) The Promise and Perils of China’s Regulation of Artificial Intelligence, available here: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4708676 Generative AI and Copyright: A Dynamic Perspective, available here: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4716233

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José Henrique Bortoluci in conversation about WHAT IS MINE at Oxford

May 1, 2024, 5 p.m.

https://www.lac.ox.ac.uk/event/bsp-jose-henrique-bortoluci-in-conversation-about-what-is-mine-at-oxford

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Modern Contemporary Literature Graduate Forum

May 1, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Prof Simon Coleman | Lecture 1 - ‘Trivial Religion?: From Liminal to Lateral’

May 1, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

‘Trivial Religion?: From Liminal to Lateral’ [Wednesday 1 May, from 5:15 to 6:45 pm, Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel College, to be followed by reception in the Harris Seminar Room, Oriel College] Two perspectives have dominated social scientific work on religion and ritual. One highlights transcendence, intensity, the spectacular. The other emphasizes immanence, banality, the everyday. I argue that studying pilgrimage suggests the generative possibilities of adopting another point of view: an exploration of initially glancing ritual encounters that may have wider consequences than first appears. Such an approach examines mutually constitutive articulations between backgrounds and foregrounds, ‘looser’ and ‘tighter’ behaviours, adjacencies and immediacies, in tracing how even apparently uncommitted people move through and respond to religious environments. In reflecting on these themes I introduce a key distinction between ‘lateral’ and liminal engagements with ritual practices.

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Local Authority and Private Enterprise: Provisioning the Habsburg Army from the Seven Years War

May 1, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Science Colab: empowering scientific communities to publish, review and curate their research

May 2, 2024, 10 a.m.

Research articles are submitted to scholarly journals to enable peer evaluation, public endorsement, and wide communication. By authoring peer-reviewed publications, researchers gain recognition for their work, particularly when published in high-impact journals. However, these opportunities are neither inclusive, nor equitable, nor transparent. Science Colab is leveraging the increasing popularity of preprints to provide an alternative model that democratises scientific publishing. Authors first publish their work as a preprint so that it can be openly reviewed by the community and eventually curated as a version of record. Our first community endeavour, Biophysics Colab, provides collaborative and constructive peer review of biophysical preprints without charge, aiming to improve the quality of these studies within a transparent framework. We publicly endorse studies that address a research question with rigour, and will soon begin to curate such studies as journal articles that will be indexed in the usual way. In the future, we will develop a not-for-profit business model that compensates reviewers and curators for their time and expertise. By encouraging others to adopt this model, we envisage a future in which research is fairly evaluated, openly communicated and its significance recognised independently of publication venue.

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Reflective practice in the STEM disciplines

May 2, 2024, 11 a.m.

Deep and reflective thinkers in our society and history are often those that come from the STEM disciplines. However, modern day education and exam systems are forcing students to be passive thinkers, accepting information, and not allowing time to acknowledge academic, personals and professional achievements. To tackle these issues, a reflective portfolio was designed and embed into the curriculum in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. The session will discuss lessons learned from the process of implementing the portfolio aiming to support student learning. It will present a cross institutional project that is investigating the use of portfolios within UK universities and highlight case-study findings from students who have used the portfolios. The session would like to explore discussion on reflection in STEM teacher education to inform practice across the disciplines. Dr Alison Cullinane is the Portfolio Director at the School of Biological Sciences. In this role she has creative control to design reflective portfolios for undergraduate programmes, which are administered to over 700 students each semester. She is the principal investigator on a project investigating the use of portfolios in Schools of Biological Sciences in universities the UK. The project looks at best approaches for supporting students’ reflective practice. Alison previously held a lecturing position at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, where she maintains supervision of her masters and PhD students through her Honorary Norham Fellowship.

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A break in mitochondrial endosymbiosis as a basis for inflammatory diseases

May 2, 2024, noon

The endosymbiotic origin of mitochondria means that within our cells we host hundreds of organelles that retain many aspects of their bacterial origin which must be tolerated. Consequently, the release of mitochondrial factors into the cytosol can trigger cell death, innate immunity and inflammation. A range of findings in immunometabolism have revealed how mitochondria are an important source of factors that promote immunity and inflammation. These include mitochondrial nucleic acids that can be sensed by innate sensors such as cGAS and MDA-5, metabolites such as succinate, fumarate and itaconate, that have a range of effects, with itaconate in particular being anti-inflammatory. Recent work from my lab has uncovered a role of fumarate hydratase in driving the release of mitochondrial double-stranded RNA, and a role of reactive oxygen species made by Complex III in the electron transport chain as being key for IL10 induction. Since mitochondrial change appears critical for inflammation, it could be that environmental factors, including obesity, pathogens or toxins, might promote a breakdown in endosymbiosis. This could be part of why the incidence of autoimmune disease has increased substantially over the past 50 years or so.

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Lewy body dementia: From the lab, to the clinic and the community beyond

May 2, 2024, noon

Part of the Dementia Research Oxford seminar series Our vision is to transform research and healthcare in dementia. Dementia Research Oxford, led by Professors Masud Husain and Cornelia van Duijn, brings together researchers and clinicians across the University, our hospitals, patients, and industry partners to translate our growing insights in the basic molecular origin disease into effective treatment and prevention. We aim to take science further from drug target to treatment, from molecular pathology to early diagnosis and prognosis and from early intervention to prevention

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Precision proteomics broadens MultiOmics repertoire and enables biomarker discovery

May 2, 2024, noon

Olink Proteomics is a Swedish company with strong global presence, that enables high-plex protein biomarker discovery and development. Olink’s platform currently has the ability to robustly measure ~5,400 analytes. It’s been used in different settings due to its scalability and actionability such as in the elucidation of pathways and mechanisms of drug action, as a screening tools for identifying signatures/biomarkers with a prognostic/predictive significance as well as to safety and toxicity studies, drug target selection and differentiation. Due to the fact that the protein library, which continuously expands, covers all major biological pathways the applications are in numerous disease areas, such as, Cardiology, Diabetes Immuno-oncology and Neurology. In this scientific seminar they will go through a series of case studies elucidating the power of their capabilities: • How Olink technology enables biomarker identification, precision medicine and multiOmics approaches. • Examples of Olink technology applied in specific human disease areas.

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Practical prompting: techniques to help you and your students make the most out of AI

May 2, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Using ChatGPT is deceptively effortless. It simply responds to any question it is asked. But the way the question is formulated often matters. Generative AI tools often don’t give their users any feedback on how to better prompt it and sometimes even respond with incorrect tips. This session will cover some of the practical lessons learned in the last year about how to best prompt generative tools. It will cover: - What is prompt engineering - How do we learn about what prompts work - Key principles of prompt construction - Importance of iteration - 5 techniques for prompt construction and their suitability: Giving examples, Adopting a persona, Asking for structure, Asking for self-critique (and its limitations), Chain of Thought (and its limitations).

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Book Launch: Tabernacles in the Wilderness: The US Christian Commission on the Civil War Battlefront

May 2, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Tabernacles in the Wilderness discusses the work of the United States Christian Commission (USCC), a civilian relief agency established by northern evangelical Protestants to minister to Union troops during the American Civil War. USCC workers saw in the Civil War not only a wrathful judgment from God for the sins of the nation but an unparalleled opportunity to save the souls of US citizens and perfect the nation. Thus, the workers set about proselytizing and distributing material aid to Union soldiers with undaunted and righteous zeal. Whether handing out religious literature, leading prayer meetings, preaching sermons, mending uniforms, drawing up tailored diets for sick men, or bearing witness to deathbed scenes, USCC workers improvised and enacted a holistic lived theology that emphasized the link between the body and soul. Making extensive use of previously neglected archival material—most notably the reports, diaries, and correspondence of the volunteer delegates who performed this ministry on the battlefront—Rachel Williams explores the proselytizing methods employed by the USCC, the problems encountered in their application, and the ideological and theological underpinnings of their work. Tabernacles in the Wilderness offers fascinating new insights into the role of civilians within army camps, the bureaucratization and professionalization of philanthropy during the Civil War and in the United States more broadly, and the emotional landscape and material culture of faith and worship. Rachel Williams is a lecturer in American history at the University of Hull, England, where she teaches courses on the American Civil War, American medicine, and women’s history. She is co-editor of American Philanthropy at Home and Abroad: New Directions in the History of Giving and served as secretary of the British Association for American Studies between 2019 and 2023.

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Ideas to Action: Effective Public Engagement with Research (online)

May 2, 2024, 1 p.m.

COURSE DETAILS This 3-hour session is tailored to those looking to explore evidence-based strategies for designing activities/events, apply for Public Engagement with Research (PER) funding, or get practical tips for organising an activity. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the session, participants will be able to: Develop effective communication strategies for presenting complex research concepts to non-specialist audiences. Explore different learning and engagement theories and how they can inform effective public engagement strategies. Learn to adapt engagement techniques based on different audiences. Learn how to assess the effectiveness of engagement approaches and refine them accordingly.

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Medical Grand Rounds - Week 4: Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

May 2, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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Title TBC

May 2, 2024, 2 p.m.

Literature and Mental Health: Reading Group Session 1

May 2, 2024, 2 p.m.

Webpage: english.web.ox.ac.uk/reading-group-literature-and-mental-health Reading list: drive.google.com/drive/folders/1u3IaqwXUPyeOKKQ0oznFdeMODLlTw35g?usp=sharing Please copy and paste the links into a different tab in case they do not open here. Thank you.

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Transfer of Status Presentations

May 2, 2024, 2 p.m.

*Kenneth Wong*, ‘To Advise, Encourage, and Warn: The Private Secretary to the Sovereign, 1867-1953’ *Natalie Martz*, ‘Ice Men: Irish Polar Explorers of the Royal Navy from 1818-1860’

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Authenticating Nature: Fossils and Fakes, 1590-1620

May 2, 2024, 2 p.m.

How does one establish the authenticity of nature? In this paper, I investigate this puzzle in the decades around 1600. Across early modern Europe, ancient artefacts were treated with growing suspicion. Fake coins and inscriptions flooded the antiquarian market, and forgeries were ubiquitous in reputable collections. Within learned circles of natural history, the fossilized remains of extinct creatures fuelled a similar crisis of authenticity. Some naturalists claimed that extinct species represented “genuine animals” (vera animalia), yet others dismissed these as bad imitations or “jokes” (lusi) that were not to be taken seriously. This paper examines the intertwined discourse of extinction and authenticity through two contemporary case studies: the apothecaries Ferrante and Francesco Imperato; and the botanist Fabio Colonna. It suggests that naturalists adopted methods of authentication from antiquarians, borrowing methods of empirical comparison and textual verification.

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Neuroimmune Cardiovascular Interfaces in Atherosclerosis

May 2, 2024, 3 p.m.

Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of arteries caused by plaques in the inner layer of arteries. As plaques lack nerve fibers, the impact of neuronal control on atherosclerosis has not been considered before. Since the nervous system uses the adventitia, i.e. the outer connective tissue coat of arteries, as their major conduit to reach distant targets, we hypothesized that the nervous system may interact with diseased arteries via adventitial immune cells to sense and affect atherosclerosis. We identified and functionally delineated tripartite interactions between nerves, immune cells and diseased arteries in murine and human atherosclerosis using tissue clearing, multiplex immunostaining, intact aorta imaging, virus tracing, and single cell transcriptomics. We observed that atherosclerotic adventitia segments interact with the nervous system by stimulating axon growth adjacent to atherosclerotic plaques. Peripheral axon terminals directly interact with immune cells and form neuroimmune junctions. These interactions initiate a structural artery-brain circuit that directly wire diseased arteries with the brain to sense and affect atherosclerosis via dorsal root ganglia, sympathetic ganglia and the spinal cord. Multimodal imaging and electrophysiological nerve recordings revealed activation of central and peripheral components of artery-brain circuits in parallel to disease progression. When these interactions are disrupted by systemic or local sympathetic denervation in mice, plaque-associated immune cell aggregates in the adventitia destabilized, plaques shrunk and showed a more stable phenotype. These data provide a new disease paradigm to understand atherogenesis through multisystemic tissue interactions between the nervous system, the immune system and the cardiovascular system. In summary, our data demonstrated that neuroimmune cardiovascular interactions affect atherosclerosis progression. These studies suggest that neuroimmune cardiovascular interfaces represent new targets using pharmaceutical, surgical and bioelectronic modulations before the disease including becomes life-threatening.

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Equal Partnerships: African intermediary cities as actors in urban migration governance

May 2, 2024, 3:45 p.m.

OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Four

May 2, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Four: Developing and Synthesising Evidence Regarding the Comparative Effectiveness of Public Health and Social Measures (PHSM) Against COVID-19 Presenter: Dr Francisco Pozo-Martin, Robert Koch Institute Discussant: Professor Julia Wang, National Taiwan University Legacies of Authoritarian Government and Civil Society as Norms in Times of Crisis Presenter: Dr Philipp Trein, University of Lausanne Discussant: Professor Stella Ladi, Queen Mary University of London The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 16:00-17:30 BST.

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Loving Someone Whose Death Wouldn’t Matter

May 2, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

A series of three public lectures, by Professor Elizabeth Harman (in-person only). Lecture 2 of 3. What does love teach us about abortion? How does love challenge our ideas about abortion? How can love explain the importance of abortion?

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The Future of Work in the Age of AI

May 2, 2024, 5 p.m.

Panel Discussion on The Future of Work in the Age of AI Join us at the Nelson Mandela Hall, Saïd Business School (University of Oxford) for a fascinating discussion on the future of work in the era of artificial intelligence (AI), featuring: Daron Acemoglu, Institute Professor, MIT, and Sanjaya Lall Visiting Professor, University of Oxford Sir Chrisopher Pissarides, Regius Professor of Economics, LSE, and Nobel laureate in economics Helen Margetts, Professor of Internet and Society, University of Oxford How can we best use AI technologies to create meaningful and well-paying jobs in the future? This panel event will bring together three of the world's leading thinkers on AI's societal impact to debate the future of work in the age of AI. There are many untapped opportunities for creating pro-worker, pro-human AI, and there are some small-scale examples showing that this is feasible. Yet, the current trend in AI technologies is towards greater inequality and more work elimination. It also appears inevitable that there will be more surveillance both in workplaces and beyond. In contrast, some believe in a different set of priorities and a different architecture for AI models that could be more useful for workers. Are there examples of occupations in which jobs can be made more meaningful and wages can increase if AI is used in the right way? And if so, are there barriers to achieving this type of outcome? The event will be followed by a reception with food and drinks.

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Grand Environmental Challenges: Exploring the Interplay Between Global Dynamics and Local Realities

May 2, 2024, 5 p.m.

As environmental challenges escalate, and the responses required become ever more urgent, tensions are emerging between the globally adopted goals and local actions needed to achieve them. How capable are global decision-making institutions for addressing these challenges? How can we best upscale local knowledge and capabilities into global research and decision making? How do we equitably and effectively disaggregate global targets into local actions? Join us as we explore these questions and more with our panel of experts, and continue the discussions afterwards at our drinks reception. All welcome! Since we are hosting a drinks reception after the event, we ask that you quickly register using the form link provided so we can track numbers of attendees. Note that you are still welcome to join the event on the day if you have not registered. *Date:* 2nd May 2024 *Event time:* 5pm - 6.30pm *Drinks reception time:* 6.30pm - 7pm *Venue:* Jesus College Auditorium, Turl Street, Oxford. Directions to the venue will be sent via email after you register. *Register here:* "https://forms.gle/rJHS5NrYigfraZTL9":https://forms.gle/rJHS5NrYigfraZTL9 *Expert Panel:* - *Prof Michael Obersteiner*, Director - _Environmental Change Institute_ - *Dr Bronwyn Wake*, Editor in Chief - _Nature Climate Change_ - *Dr Stephanie Brittain*, Research Fellow - _Interdisciplinary Centre for Conservation Science_ - *Dr Rhian Rees-Owen*, International Climate Science Lead, IPCC and UNFCCC - _UK Department for Energy Security and Net Zero_

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Making sense of chaos: a better economics for a better world

May 2, 2024, 5 p.m.

We live in an age of increasing complexity, where accelerating technology and global interconnection hold more promise – and more peril – than any other time in human history. The fossil fuels that have powered global wealth creation now threaten to destroy the world they helped build. Automation and digitisation promise prosperity for some, unemployment for others. Financial crises fuel growing inequality, polarisation and the retreat of democracy. At heart, all these problems are rooted in the economy, yet the guidance provided by economic models has often failed. Using big data and ever more powerful computers, we are now able for the first time to apply complex systems science to economic activity, building realistic models of the global economy. The resulting simulations and the emergent behaviour we observe form the cornerstone of the science of complexity economics, allowing us to test ideas and make significantly better economic predictions – to better address the hard problems facing the world. In this talk Doyne Farmer, author of Making Sense of Chaos: A Better Economics for a Better World presents a manifesto for how to do economics better. He will fuse his profound knowledge and expertise with stories from his life to explain how we can bring a scientific revolution to bear on the economic conundrums facing society. This is a joint event with INET Oxford. This event will be followed by a drinks reception, all welcome. REGISTRATION To register to attend in person in Oxford: https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/events/making-sense-of-chaos/ To register to watch live online on Crowdcast click here: https://www.crowdcast.io/c/making-sense-of-chaos

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Shakespeare and the Jesuits: Spiritual Direction in King Lear, Alison Shell, UCL

May 2, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Week 2 Alison Shell, UCL 2 May Shakespeare and the Jesuits: Spiritual Direction in King Lear Offered by the Faculties of History and Theology and Religion. Drinks will be served after the seminar on 25 April and 13 June. For more information, or for the Teams link to join remotely, please contact sarah.apetrei@campion.ox.ac.uk

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First Annual Voltaire Foundation Lecture on Digital Enlightenment Studies

May 2, 2024, 5 p.m.

A lecture series organised by the Voltaire Foundation, in collaboration with DiSc and Linacre College. Join us for a talk from Glenn Roe (Sorbonne University & Oxford University) - The Poetics of Text Reuse: Digital Intertextuality in the Eighteenth-century Archive.

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Chairman Mao’s Children: Generation and the Politics of Memory in China

May 2, 2024, 5 p.m.

In the 1960s and 1970s, around 17 million Chinese youths were mobilized or forced by the state to migrate to rural villages and China's frontiers. In his book, Chairman Mao’s Children: Generation and the Politics of Memory in China (Cambridge 2021), Bin Xu tells the story of how this 'sent-down' generation has come to terms with their difficult past. Exploring representations of memory, including personal life stories, literature, museum exhibits and acts of commemoration, he argues that these representations are defined by a struggle to reconcile worthiness with the political upheavals of the Mao years. These memories, however, are used by the state to construct an official narrative that weaves this generation's experiences into an upbeat story of the 'China dream'. This marginalizes those still suffering and obscures voices of self-reflection on their moral-political responsibility for their actions. Xu provides a careful analysis of this generation of 'Chairman Mao's children', caught between the political and the personal, past and present, nostalgia and regret, and pride and trauma. Bin Xu is an associate professor of sociology at Emory University and a fellow at Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin) in 2023‒2024. His research interests are the intersection between politics and culture, including civil society, collective memory, symbolic politics, and disaster. He is the author of The Culture of Democracy: A Sociological Approach to Civil Society (Polity 2022), Chairman Mao’s Children: Generation and the Politics of Memory in China (Cambridge 2021), and The Politics of Compassion: the Sichuan Earthquake and Civic Engagement in China (Stanford 2017). His articles have appeared in leading journals in sociology and China studies. He is currently working on two book projects: one is about the commemoration and memorialization of COVID deaths, and the other is about disaster politics in China.

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Autofiction and/as World Literature’

May 2, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

The aim of the seminar is to foster a dynamic and interdisciplinary postcolonial research culture supportive of individual scholarship. Finalists, M.St. and D.Phil. students, lecturers, fellows, scholars from across the university community – all are welcome. If you’d like to appear on the seminar mailing list, please email martha.swift@ell.ox.ac.uk OR hannah.fagan@mansfield.ox.ac.uk

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Ban Ki-moon speaks on "Human Rights in a Fractured World"

May 2, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Kellogg College's Bynum Tudor Fellow Ban Ki-moon will deliver the inaugural lecture in a new annual series on human rights. This year’s lecture is titled ‘Human Rights in a Fractured World‘. Ban Ki-moon‘s ten years as Secretary General to the United Nations were marked by many successes. Throughout, he strove to enhance human rights globally. Indeed, Ban Ki-moon‘s other successes – such as the Sustainable Development Goals, establishing UN Women, and the Paris Agreement to limit the rise in global temperature to 1.5 degrees celsius – can all be seen as enhancing human rights broadly defined. The Sustainable Development Goals promote the whole range of economic and social rights. UN Women “is the UN organization delivering programmes, policies and standards that uphold women’s human rights”. And the climate crisis threatens the rights of millions, most immediately those who will be displaced, and those facing famine and disease as a result of climate change. In this lecture, Ban Ki-moon will reflect on the urgent need to defend and promote human rights and will place this in the broader context of the need to promote women’s rights, pursue the Sustainable Development Goals, and tackle the climate crisis. Refreshments will be served from 5 pm; the lecture will begin at 5.30 pm. Post-event drinks will be served in the Hub from 6.30 pm. This event will be photographed and filmed. If you do not wish to appear in the photographs/footage, please let the photographer/videographer know. Should you have any further queries, or be unable to attend after booking, please contact events@kellogg.ox.ac.uk

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Women in the German Peasants’ War

May 2, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

*Professor Lyndal Roper* launches the inaugural lecture in our ‘Uncovering Women’s History’ series. The ‘Uncovering Women’s History’ lecture series aims to explore women’s empowerment and the contribution of women and other marginalised minorities across history.

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Making Education More Than Just a Dream

May 2, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Lincoln College alumna Naomi Kellman is an award-winning Diversity & Inclusion expert, with a passion for informing and inspiring audiences, helping to prompt organisational change, and supporting people of all backgrounds to achieve their potential. She is the founder of the Target Oxbridge programme, which helps young people from under-represented groups in their educational and professional journeys, and produces a related podcast. Naomi Kellman is currently Head of Research at Rare Recruitment, has been a contributor and commentator for national newspapers, TV, and radio, and has worked at both the Department for Education and the Treasury. Dr Maryanne Saunders is Lincoln College’s Access and Career Development Fellow, having previously held similar roles at The Brilliant Club, Regent’s Park College and St John’s College. Dr Saunders holds a doctorate in Religious Art from King’s College London with a thesis on ‘Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Religious Art’, and is engaged in interdisciplinary research encompassing Art History, Art Criticism, Religious Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Former Lincoln College MCR President Grady Owens is a DPhil candidate in History, interested in the presence of a Collegiate Martiality on the campuses of American colleges and universities during the First World War. He completed an MSt in the History of War at Oxford and a dual major in History and Asian Studies with a minor in Anthropology at Cornell University. This panel will be chaired by Maria Branco, former Lincoln College MCR Academic Officer and a DPhil candidate in Medieval & Modern Languages, researching the works of Portuguese writers Natália Correia and Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen. The panel will be followed by a free drinks reception.

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Mexico's missing - How families and technology are working together

May 2, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Since the ‘war on drugs' was declared in 2007, disappearances related to drug cartel violence has been one of the most critical issues in Mexico. There are currently 114,000 individuals reported missing and the impact on their families is enormous. Lucía de los Angeles Díaz comes from one of these families. She has founded a mothers' collective - Solecito de Veracruz - to search for their loved ones. So far, they have been able to return the remains of over 300 disappeared to their families. In collaboration with universities and a local government in Mexico, researchers from the Global Security Programme at the Blavatnik School of Government saw an opportunity to help these families through the FOUND project. This project uses technology to locate and analyse search areas using satellite imagery, drones, sensors and multispectral cameras. Lucía de los Angeles Díaz will be joined by Miguel Moctezuma, Global Security Programme and Víctor Ávila, Jalisco Search Commissioner, as they discuss the work of the mothers’ collective and the collaboration with the FOUND project, and offer an update on the status of the search protocol.

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Book Launch: Savarkar and the Making of Hindutva

May 2, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Vinayak Damodar Savarkar (1883–1966) was an intellectual, ideologue, and anticolonial nationalist leader in India’s struggle for independence from British colonial rule, one whose anti-Muslim writings exploited India’s tensions in pursuit of Hindu majority rule. Savarkar and the Making of Hindutva is the first comprehensive intellectual history of one of the most contentious political thinkers of the twentieth century. Janaki Bakhle is professor of Indian history at the University of California, Berkeley. Her previous book was Two Men and Music: Nationalism in the making of an Indian Classical Tradition (published by Oxford) , and her most recent book is on the chief ideologue of right wing Hindu nationalism, V.D. Savarkar. She is also working on a book called Mavericks for the Nation: Hindu Nationalism without Hindutva, on Rajaram Shastri Bhagwat and T.S. Shejwalkar. She has also written on secularism, feminism, surveillance and the colonial police.

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The Challenge of Emissions - ZERO Institute keynote invited talk from Breakthrough Energy's Dr Eric Toone

May 2, 2024, 6 p.m.

Modern prosperity is based on ready access to cheap abundant energy – energy that produces goods and services and moves those goods and services to where they are needed. Today the energy on which our society is based is extracted almost exclusively from a store of carbon-based fossil materials. That extraction results in the production of greenhouse gases, with profound impacts for our planet. The conversion from a fossil economy to an economy based on non-emitting sources of energy is the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced. It will require tremendous innovation and deployment of that innovation at nearly inconceivable scales, to every corner of the planet. In this talk we consider some of the innovations now on the horizon, areas in need of additional innovation and the challenges imposed by the scale at which this innovation must be deployed. Dr. Eric Toone leads science, technology, and engineering across the entire Breakthrough Energy platform. As Managing Partner at Bill Gates' Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Eric serves on the Investment Committee and is responsible for the overall technical direction of the organization, with responsibilities ranging from thesis development to technical diligence. Dr. Toone is responsible for the Fellows Program at Breakthrough Energy and directs technology diligence at Catalyst and other BE components. Prior to BEV Eric was a member of the faculty of Chemistry at Duke University and is the former Director of DOE’s Advanced Research Program Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). Originally trained as a bioorganic/physical organic chemist, Eric has long worked in both exploratory science and the translation of that science to practical implementation. At Duke University he authored nearly 300 original papers and abstracts. From 2012 – 2016 he served as Vice Provost and Director of Duke’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative. He is also listed as an inventor on over 30 patents and is the founder of three venture backed pharmaceutical companies.

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The Challenge of Emissions - ZERO Institute keynote invited talk from Breakthrough Energy's Dr Eric Toone

May 2, 2024, 6 p.m.

Modern prosperity is based on ready access to cheap abundant energy – energy that produces goods and services and moves those goods and services to where they are needed. Today the energy on which our society is based is extracted almost exclusively from a store of carbon-based fossil materials. That extraction results in the production of greenhouse gases, with profound impacts for our planet. The conversion from a fossil economy to an economy based on non-emitting sources of energy is the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced. It will require tremendous innovation and deployment of that innovation at nearly inconceivable scales, to every corner of the planet. In this talk we consider some of the innovations now on the horizon, areas in need of additional innovation and the challenges imposed by the scale at which this innovation must be deployed. Dr. Eric Toone leads science, technology, and engineering across the entire Breakthrough Energy platform. As Managing Partner at Bill Gates' Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Eric serves on the Investment Committee and is responsible for the overall technical direction of the organization, with responsibilities ranging from thesis development to technical diligence. Dr. Toone is responsible for the Fellows Program at Breakthrough Energy and directs technology diligence at Catalyst and other BE components. Prior to BEV Eric was a member of the faculty of Chemistry at Duke University and is the former Director of DOE’s Advanced Research Program Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). Originally trained as a bioorganic/physical organic chemist, Eric has long worked in both exploratory science and the translation of that science to practical implementation. At Duke University he authored nearly 300 original papers and abstracts. From 2012 – 2016 he served as Vice Provost and Director of Duke’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative. He is also listed as an inventor on over 30 patents and is the founder of three venture backed pharmaceutical companies.

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Competence and expertise: navigating the challenges of an outcomes-based surgical curriculum

May 3, 2024, 8 a.m.

Oscar Traynor is the Director of International Surgical Training Programmes at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. For more than 25 years, he was the Dean of Postgraduate Surgical Education and Training with responsibility for all surgical training in Ireland. He has been responsible for introducing several innovations to surgical training, including the world’s first e-learning programme for surgical trainees, a comprehensive curriculum-based surgical simulation programme for teaching technical skills and an integrated Human Factors training programme. He has published widely on various aspects of surgical training and has also lectured extensively on the subject of Human Factors in Surgery in Europe, Australia and North America. In October 2021, he was given an Honorary Fellowship of the American College of Surgeons in recognition of his contributions to surgical education and training. In September 2022, he became the first Irish surgeon to be inducted into the Academy of Master Surgeon Educators in the United States. Until recently, he was also the Director of Clinical Governance at Blackrock Health Hermitage Medical Clinic in Dublin, a post he held since 2014. In this role, he was responsible for patient safety and quality of care at the hospital and he promoted various patient safety initiatives. Through the Clinical Governance Committee, he achieved wide stakeholder involvement in promoting the “culture of patient safety” at Hermitage. He retired from clinical practice as a consultant surgeon at St Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin in 2014. For more than 25 years, he headed a very busy Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery unit and played a leading role in developing the National Liver Transplant Programme in Ireland in the early 1990s. The HPB unit at St. Vincent’s University Hospital in Dublin is the sole national tertiary referral centre for Liver Transplantation and for Pancreas Cancer surgery in Ireland. Coffee, tea and pastries will be served in the Lecture Theatre. Please email Louise King (louise.king@nds.ox.ac.uk) if you would like to attend online.

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Transcriptomic studies in the human airways

May 3, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Navigating the translational research pathway

May 3, 2024, 11 a.m.

Dr Oliver Rughani-Hindmarch and Vlada Yarosh from the Translational Research Office (MSD) will present key tips on how to navigate the translational research pathway for postdocs and other research staff who are not students. The session will include a short Q&A. To join the event, please "click here":https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_MGQ5NThjNjQtNzM4ZS00ZmE0LWFmMTctMzY4MDZmZGEzYzVj%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22cc95de1b-97f5-4f93-b4ba-fe68b852cf91%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22f6215955-7b24-48ec-a76a-2933147ca7b5%22%7d. Each PoPoH session covers: * a brief overview of career and training support available to postdocs and other research staff across the University * a 30-minute lecture by an expert on the session’s theme * a new project management tip each month * a Career Chat where a Careers Adviser for Research Staff will address careers concerns and questions * ideas for simple things you can do now for your career and work/life balance

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Mechanism of Autophagy in Health and Disease

May 3, 2024, 11 a.m.

Open scholarship: foundations of copyright for researchers

May 3, 2024, 11 a.m.

This workshop will cover the basics of copyright as they apply to researchers at the University of Oxford. It will explain the different types of copyright work that are used or generated in research and the rights and responsibilities for researchers and academic authors in an age of increasingly open scholarship. We will discuss the practical implications of copyright law on the publication process, as well as the production and sharing of research data. This will include the licensing of research outputs and data and the use of open licences such as Creative Commons. We will also cover ownership of copyright, author agreements with publishers and the benefits of signing up to the University of Oxford rights retention pilot. Finally, the session will cover the use of copyright content owned by others as part of the research process. This will involve looking at the role of rights clearance, copyright exceptions, due diligence and risk management in common research scenarios. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Map of the Arctic indicating samples collected during the CAO ARISE project

May 3, 2024, noon

Warming of the Arctic is altering the physical environment, reducing sea ice cover and melting glaciers at unprecedented rates. The response of primary productivity by phytoplankton to enhanced light availability or increased glacial inflow will hinge on the availability of nutrient resources, especially nitrogen. Here, I will summarise our findings from the Changing Arctic Ocean programme on nutrient dynamics, cleaned from analysis of historical data sets and stable nitrogen isotopes. I will introduce new observations on the occurrence of marine nitrogen fixation in the cold Arctic Ocean and discuss implications for the future Arctic ecosystem.

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Title TBC

May 3, 2024, 1 p.m.

Work In Progress | Student Panel

May 3, 2024, 1 p.m.

Join us for our first panel discussion of the new year, which is an exciting student ‘work-in-progress’ panel, with Joe Ward (Oxford) and Holly Cooper (Oxford). Each presenter will deliver a 15 minute paper on some of their current and upcoming work, welcoming feedback, questions, and advice from the Race & Resistance community. After both papers, Dr. Chantelle Lewis will host a Q&A session before closing the session. Joe Ward (he/him): The Case of Black Radical Disciplinarity Bio: Joseph Ward is a DPhil student in Political Theory at Corpus Christi College. Before his DPhil, he completed an MPhil in Political Theory at Somerville College, Oxford and a BA in Politics between the University of Exeter and the University of Munich. He has previously worked in the archive of the Eastern Daily Press and is currently a section editor for the Oxford Political Review. Holly Cooper (they/them): The Significance of Coventry in 20th Century Black Britain Bio: Holly Cooper is a DPhil History student based at the University of Oxford, supervised by Dr. Meleisa Ono-George and Dr. Chantelle Lewis, and funded by the Black Academic Futures scholarship. They are an experienced researcher, currently working on the UCL/Oxford, ‘A portrait of Empire, Migration, and Belonging in England’s secondary schools’ (2022 – 2025), as well as facilitating the Race & Resistance seminar series for the 2023/24 academic year. Holly is an alum of the MA in Black British History at Goldsmiths, University of London. Jean Beesley (she/her): From Windrush to Windrush: The exploration and documentation of the history of Oxford’s Windrush Generation (1939 - 1985) Bio: Jean Beesley (she/her) is a first year doctoral, English Local History student at Oxford, whose parents were Windrush Generation. Jean gained her MA in English at Oxford Brookes, taught Humanities in Oxford’s secondary schools and appreciates the significance of members of Oxford’s Windrush Generation’s history being recorded in their own words. This includes the contribution made to Oxford’s history by Oxford’s Windrush Generation, especially the lessons to be learned from the intersectionality between the Windrush Generation and Oxford’s wider community. --------- Twitter: race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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Blood-Brain Barrier Dynamics in Vascular Dementia: Unravelling the Tripartite Crosstalk between the Endothelium, Pericytes, and Microglia

May 3, 2024, 1 p.m.

Background: Small vessel disease (SVD) is a prevalent disorder of the brain’s microvessels and a common cause of dementia and stroke. Recent evidence suggests a key role involving features of normal ageing in disease development and progression, including endothelial activation, pericyte dysfunction, blood-brain barrier (BBB) failure, and a chemotactic microglia response. Here, we aim to examine this relationship through a series of translational investigations. Methods: Using spinning-disk confocal and multispectral microscopy, we first quantified pericyte coverage and endothelial activation (VCAM-1 expression) in young and aged C57Bl/6J mice, and in young controls, mild and severe SVD cases, respectively. Secondly, pericyte and endothelial fluid biomarkers were analysed in a mild and non-disabling stroke cohort, correlating them with SVD MRI markers and cognition. Thirdly, we employed a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) exclusively targeting brain endothelial cells to overexpress (OE) Vcam1, Icam1, Selp and Sele in mice, shedding light on endothelial activation's role in pericyte dysfunction and BBB breakdown, but also the reciprocal influences with the microglial response. Finally, we used an innovative mouse model allowing the genetic manipulation of brain pericytes specifically (Atp13a5-CreER), offering insights into their biological impact on neighbouring cells and BBB functions. Results: Both aged mice and SVD cases exhibited a significant reduction in pericyte coverage and increase in VCAM-1 expression in microvessels ( 10 m in diameter). Biomarker analyses revealed associations between PDGFRB, PDGF-BB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin concentrations with specific SVD manifestations. Preclinical AAV experiments highlighted correlations between endothelial activation, pericyte dysfunction, reduced brain perfusion, and BBB breakdown, with distinct immune responses observed in AAV-Vcam1OE and AAV-Icam1OE groups. The brain pericyte-specific mouse model unveiled diverse pericyte subtypes along the vascular tree, emphasizing their importance in microvascular dynamics. Capillary endothelial cells rapidly acquired a pro-inflammatory signature upon genetic ablation of brain pericytes. Conclusion: Our multifaceted approach highlights the crucial role of endothelial-pericyte crosstalk in vascular dementia progression. The integration of post-mortem brain tissues, fluid biomarkers, viral manipulations, and innovative mouse models enriches our understanding of the tripartite crosstalk, paving the way for potential therapeutic interventions in vascular dementia. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Dr Axel Montagne joined the UK Dementia Research Institute at Edinburgh in 2020. He completed his PhD degree at the University of Caen Normandy (France), followed by postdoctoral training at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles. Axel rapidly became Assistant then Associate Professor at USC in 2016 and 2020, respectively. His career has focused on how cerebrovascular dysfunctions contribute to neurodegeneration and dementia in both animal models and humans. In his UK DRI program, he combines molecular approaches with rodent non-invasive imaging, particularly MRI and microscopy techniques, to study the causes and effects of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, with a particular focus on the Endothelium-Pericyte-Immune tripartite interactions, in the context of neurodegenerative disease. Dr Montagne’s work is supported by the UK DRI, principally funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC), and additional funding partners (Alzheimer’s Research UK, Alzheimer’s Society UK, and British Heart Foundation). In addition, Dr Montagne was awarded the 2021 SCOR Young European Researcher Prize for his research into Alzheimer’s disease and a MRC Career Development Award in 2022.

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Title TBC

May 3, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Rabinder Singh: Human Rights Law in its Historical Context

May 3, 2024, 2 p.m.

How did we get to our current state of human rights? How can we understand human rights law over the course of history? What place does human rights law take in today’s democratic societies?

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Epidemiological modelling with behavioural considerations and to inform policy making

May 3, 2024, 2 p.m.

Many problems in epidemiology are impacted by behavioural dynamics, whilst in response to health emergencies prompt analysis and communication of findings is required to be of use to decision makers. Both instances are likely to benefit from interdisciplinary approaches. This talk will feature two examples, one with a public health focus and one with a veterinary health focus. In the first part, I will summarise work originally conducted in late 2020 that was contributed to Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational sub-group (SPI-M-O) of SAGE (Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies) on Christmas household bubbles in England. This was carried out in response to a policy involving a planned easing of restrictions in England between 23–27 December 2020, with Christmas bubbles allowing people from up to three households to meet throughout the holiday period. Using a household model and computational simulation, we estimated the epidemiological impact of both this and alternative bubble strategies that allowed extending contacts beyond the immediate household. (Associated paper: Modelling the epidemiological implications for SARS-CoV-2 of Christmas household bubbles in England in December 2020. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2022.111331) In the second part, I will present a methodological pipeline developed to generate novel quantitative data on farmer beliefs with respect to disease management, process the data into a form amenable for use in mathematical models of livestock disease transmission and then refine said mathematical models according to the findings of the data. Such an approach is motivated by livestock disease models traditionally omitting variation in farmer disease management behaviours. I will discuss our application of this methodology for a fast, spatially spreading disease outbreak scenario amongst cattle herds in Great Britain, for which we elicited when farmers would use an available vaccine and then used the attained behavioural groups within a livestock disease model to make epidemiological and health economic assessments. (Associated paper: Incorporating heterogeneity in farmer disease control behaviour into a livestock disease transmission model. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2023.106019)

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Title TBC

May 3, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

On the Inconsistency of Cluster-Robust Inference and How Subsampling Can Fix It

May 3, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

Conventional methods of cluster-robust inference are inconsistent in the presence of unignorably large clusters. We formalize this claim by establishing a necessary and sufficient condition for the consistency of the conventional methods. We find that this condition for the consistency is rejected for a majority of empirical research papers. In this light, we propose a novel score subsampling method that achieves uniform size control over a broad class of data generating processes, covering that fails the conventional method. Simulation studies support these claims. With real data used by an empirical paper, we showcase that the conventional methods conclude significance while our proposed method concludes insignificance.

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2024 Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture

May 3, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

Engineering has transformed biomedicine over the past decades. Current engineering research is pushing the boundaries of the possible, from designing and controlling biological systems from the ground up, to creating new biomaterials and devices. Future developments will transform the way we create new drugs, provide personalised medicine and produce biocompatible materials and devices. This year’s Lubbock lectures cover some of the most impactful applications of engineering, focusing on synthetic biology, biomaterials and medical devices. Our 2024 Lubbock Memorial lecturer is James T. Collins, Termeer Professor of Medical Engineering & Science and Professor of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jim's talk is titled Synthetic Biology: Biology by Design. The Lubbock supporting lectures cover the breadth of Oxford Engineering Science in this field. Professor Harrison Steel, will talk about Robotics and Control meet Synthetic Biology. Professor Malavika Nair will discuss Biomaterials for SMART Medical Devices and Professor Antonis Papachristodoulou will talk about Feedback in Engineering Biology: Designing Biocontrollers.

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New Life From the Ruins of Japanese Death Rites

May 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

Deep in the Fukuyama mountains, “the grave of the graves” houses acres of unwanted headstones. In the past, the Japanese dead became venerated ancestors through sustained ritual offerings at graves and butsudan. But in social atomised twenty-first Japan, this intergenerational system of care, along with the household and nation that once sustained it, is collapsing. This talk describes the practical and affective burdens imposed by the ruins of vanishing death rites and explores how new life (which is to say new death) may emerge. Dr Hannah Gould (Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology, The University of Melbourne) is a cultural anthropologist researching death, Buddhism, and material culture in Australia and North-East Asia. Her research spans new rituals and technologies of death, the lifecycle of religious materials, and modern minimalist movements. In sum: the stuff of death and death of stuff. She is currently President of the Australian Death Studies Society and Project Manager for the Modern and Contemporary Collaborative at Japan Past & Present.

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Josep Borrell Fontelles 'Europe faced with two wars'

May 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

Josep Borrell Fontelles will give a thought-provoking lecture you won't want to miss! Join us at St Antony's College, Investcorp Auditorium as we delve into the challenges Europe is currently facing. The European Union, which has traditionally identified itself as a 'peace project’, finds itself faced with two wars, in Ukraine and in Gaza. How has it responded to them? How should it respond? What lessons should be drawn for the future of European foreign policy? And what place in those plans for European countries outside the EU, such as Britain? As the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, but also as a former Spanish Foreign Minister, Josep Borrell is uniquely placed to address these and other questions in this year’s Dahrendorf Lecture.

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OSGA Annual Lecture - Area Studies in a Time of Crisis

May 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

Over the past two decades, area studies have been rejuvenated by new forms of engagement with disciplinary knowledge and especially by the push towards de-centering concepts and references in the social sciences. It is generally accepted that area-based knowledge provides important contributions to the ongoing endeavours to developing frameworks of analysis based on a pluralistic understanding of universalism. Areal knowledge is a necessary condition to analyzing a world of multi-crises, often rooted in identity claims, and where the legitimacy of global governance is questioned on the grounds of its presumed Eurocentrism. In many contexts, however, the increasing restrictions on academic freedom, combined with the politicization of knowledge production and technological transformations, raise new challenges for the conduct and legitimacy of area studies. Taking stock of this critical context, the lecture will emphasize its continuities with a long record of challenges faced – and overcome – by area studies since their emergence. It will argue that the current crises, rather than fragilizing area studies, underscore their critical role in generating knowledge on regional and global affairs – provided they address the epistemological, methodological and ethical transformations prompted by this context, and find a proper balance of academic independence and policy relevance.

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We are Free to Change the World: Lessons from Hannah Arendt

May 3, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

In 1971, in Americam rocked by an unpopular war, political scandal, and civil unrest, the political theorist, Hannah Arendt, wrote: ‘We are free to change the world and put something new in it.’ What did she mean, and what in her life and thought had led her to this startling statement? Drawing on her new book Lyndsey Stonebridge will discuss how Hannah Arendt’s life as a woman, a Jew, and a refugee shaped her extraordinary thinking, looking at the world from outside conventional academic and political categories. What can we learn from her anti-totalitarian thinking today?

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AfOx Insaka 3rd May 2024

May 3, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Building the African AI We want-Prof Vukosi Marivate Africa's rich linguistic diversity is a unique strength that can be leveraged to advance Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology. However, limited access to high-quality annotated data, computational infrastructure and skills presents a significant challenge to developing AI models for African languages. This talk will discuss how the Data Science for Social Impact Lab at the University of Pretoria is working to improve resources, tools, and methods for African languages through collaborations with local communities and organizations across the continent. Our approach involves creating inclusive environments where researchers, developers, educators, policymakers, activists and other key stakeholders can come together to co-create innovative solutions to complex problems facing society. Our goal is to empower individuals and organizations to harness the power of AI to address critical issues such as education, healthcare and financial inclusion while preserving cultural heritage. Settler-Colonial Violence, Displacement, and Inter-Inter-generational Trauma-Professor Veronica Fynn Bruey Documenting Indigenous Peoples' experiences with colonialism, land loss, displacement, racism, and exclusion is crucial for understanding the formation of modern states. Historical agreements like the Peace of Westphalia (1648) and the Montevideo Convention (1933) ignored the plight of Indigenous Peoples, as did the 1951 Refugee Convention. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP, 2007), while not defining "Indigenous," recognizes their rights, challenging the Eurocentric, nation-state ideology that overlooks colonial violence and systemic racism. This analysis, informed by my journey as an Indigenous Liberian migrant through Ghana, Canada, England, Switzerland, Australia, and the USA, explores the intergenerational trauma and resilience of Indigenous Peoples forced into migration by slavery, imperialism, and neoliberal capitalism. It aims to understand their survival, resistance, and agency in seeking social change.

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What (or who) has changed? Reflections on ‘revisiting’ an English Town

May 6, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Seminar 3 of Trinity Term's Sociology Seminar Series Please join either in person or online. For in-person attendees, the talk will be preceded by a light lunch at 12.15pm. Please email comms@sociology.ox.ac.uk with any questions or to receive the Microsoft Teams link. Two studies, a quarter of a century apart, explore societal changes and security concerns in the British town of Macclesfield. Researchers delve into daily troubles and responses of residents following the technological, socio-economic, and political shifts of the past 25 years. The paper reflects on theoretical and methodological questions raised by revisiting research sites, examining the impact of change on perceptions of harm, security, and place. We have conducted two studies of the same research site – the town of Macclesfield in north-west England - a quarter of a century apart. Macclesfield is a town of some 53,000, about 20 miles south of the nearest large urban centre, Manchester. Our previous study of crime-talk in the town, conducted between 1994 and 1996, resulted in a book-length account of how worries about crime featured in local social relations in the mid-1990s (Girling et al. 2000, Crime and Social Change in Middle England). We returned in 2019, following a quarter of a century of technological, socio-economic, cultural and political change that included the digital revolution, austerity, migration, Brexit, greater climate consciousness, and – shortly after we commenced our research - the Covid-19 pandemic. We returned with a view to using the town, a place of relative affluence and relative safety, but with its share of social problems, arguably a kind of English ‘Middletown’, as a site for exploring what it means to be and feel secure in Britain today. We were interested in finding out what troubles afflict the daily lives of differently situated people across the town and what actions they take, or demand from responsible authorities, to deal with the things that threaten them. How might we think about the relation between these two enquiries, and what are the dilemmas of returning? How does change – in the place, relevant socio-political contexts, the intellectual environment, the trajectories and outlooks of the research team – impinge on how we make sense of the relation between harm (rather than just crime), everyday security and place? In this paper, we consider some of the theoretical, methodological and substantive questions raised by our experience of these two studies and, in so doing, reflect on the value and limits of revisiting as a sociological practice.

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Cosmopolitan Graves: Thamboosamy Pillai and Legacy Making and Unmaking in British Malaya

May 6, 2024, 3 p.m.

Keith Griffin Lecture: "Navigating a Radically Uncertain World"

May 6, 2024, 5 p.m.

Fictionalizing Indigenous Amazonia: Anthropology and its Writing Styles. A seminar with Aparecida Vilaça

May 6, 2024, 5 p.m.

Aparecida Vilaça (Professor of Social Anthropology at the Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro) is among the most eminent living anthropologists, well known for her ethnographic and theoretical work including books such as Strange Enemies: Indigenous Agency and Scenes of Encounter in Amazonia. Her more recent work has experimented with the forms and modes of writing that might encapsulate and be shaped by indigenous forms of life, and with the thresholds between ethnography, memoir, and fiction. Participants in this seminar will have the opportunity to read and to discuss with Prof. Vilaça the opening chapters from her ethnographic memoir Paletó e eu: Memórias do meu pai indígena (published in English as Paletó and Me: Memories of my Indigenous Father) and as-yet unpublished English translations of two of her ethnographic short stories (co-authored with Francisco Vilaça Gaspar and published as Ficções amazônicas). The seminar will be of interest to students and scholars of anthropology, literature, global cultures, indigenous studies, history, and postcolonial and decolonial practice. To receive copies of the readings please email iris.pearson@new.ox.ac.uk.

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How does modern media shape our view of the past?

May 6, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Lincoln College alumnus Robert Seatter is a poet, actor, historian and broadcaster. Following spells in teaching and journalism, he joined the BBC in 1989 and stayed with the Corporation for 30 years becoming its Head of History, and publishing its centenary history in 2022. In parallel, he is also an award-winning poet, with six collections to his name, and a passionate interest in taking poetry out into the wider world, engaging with people and spaces in new and vibrant ways. A unique residency with the Sir John Soane’s Museum resulted in the acclaimed collection, The House of Everything. A skilled arts professional, Robert is also Chair of The Poetry Trust and The Poetry Archive. Dr Roel Konijnendijk is the Lincoln College Darby Fellow in Ancient History. After a year in Taiwan and a year of public-facing work at the Dutch National Museum of Antiquities, he obtained a PhD in Greek warfare at UCL, and is now an expert in Classical Greek military thought and practice. Dr Konijnendijk has written about Greek tactics, Athenian democracy, Spartan traditions, Persian kingship, Herodotus, and the way modern scholarship has shaped our understanding of Greek warfare. He has been a panellist for r/AskHistorians, written for a number of history magazines, and appeared in several public-facing videos (including a very popular series for Insider). Joana Neves Teixeira is a graduate student at Lincoln College, reading for an MSt in Early Modern History (1500-1700), with a focus on gender, environment, and Indigenous histories of the Americas. Her thesis is on women’s labour and gender fluidity among Tupi-speaking Indigenous people in the sixteenth- and seventeenth centuries. In 2022, she completed a BA in History and Politics at Merton College, with a prizewinning dissertation on politics and environment in the Mexica (Aztec) Empire, between 1428-1521 CE. Joana will be talking about the historical visions of contemporary Indigenous film makers in Brazil. This panel will be chaired by Lincoln College alumna Emma Manco, who researches European integration and migration from Italy in the post-war period. She holds an MSt in Modern European History from Lincoln and a BA in History from the University of Birmingham. The panel will be followed by a free drinks reception.

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Scientific writing: core skills (in-person)

May 7, 2024, 9 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS The course will include:  Critique of readability in relevant papers.  Use of tenses in academic papers.  Writing with impact.  Concise writing.  Grammar and proof reading.  Scientific table and chart technique. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the session participants will be able to:  Develop understanding of the characteristics of scientific writing; write in simple, clear and concise scientific English.  Develop knowledge of how to write grammatically correct English.  Improve proof reading skills; organise the sections of a scientific paper effectively.  Develop a scientific argument with appropriate language that conveys the message effectively.  Make effective use of charts and tables.

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Title TBC

May 7, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Digital Scholarship coffee morning

May 7, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Join us for a digital scholarship coffee gathering – tea and coffee will be provided. There will be a lightning talk from a researcher in digital scholarship on their work, whether it’s a new project, a tool or something they want to showcase. These are a new type of event for us, so if you’d like to attend, be involved in a future session, or find out more please email digitalscholarship@humanities.ox.ac.uk These will be held in the Visiting Scholars Centre, so to attend you’ll need to bring your Bodleian Card and to leave your bags in the lockers – this event is only open to University staff and students.

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Oxford Biomedical Research Centre Drug Discovery Subtheme: opportunity for collaborations

May 7, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'Effects of a multi-component menstrual health intervention on mental health symptoms and educational performance in Ugandan schools (MENISCUS): a cluster-randomised controlled trial'

May 7, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

The MENISCUS Trial is evaluating the impact of a multi-component menstrual health intervention in Ugandan secondary schools on girls’ education, health, and wellbeing. Many girls lack the knowledge, confidence, facilities and materials needed to manage periods safely and with dignity. Improving menstrual health not only has immediate benefits to their wellbeing, but can lead to long-term improvements to women’s education, health and development. Further background can be found here: https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/research/centres-projects-groups/meniscus#about-meniscus This is a hyrbid event, held in the Department of Psychiatry’s Seminar Room and online (Zoom). Please email shona.oleary@psych.ox.ac.uk to request the Zoom link.

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Los and Enitharmon: Gender, Prophecy, and Division in Blake’s Fall

May 7, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Medical Ethics, Law, and Humanities

May 7, 2024, 1 p.m.

The Family and Medical Law Research Group and Medical Humanities are organising a monthly lunch for academics, researchers, and graduate students who are working in the broad area of medical ethics, law, and humanities. Whichever discipline you're researching in, you are very welcome to join us for an informal lunchtime gathering at Radcliffe Humanities, TORCH on the first Tuesday of each month. A simple sandwich lunch will be provided, and it will be a casual space for everyone to share ideas, collaborate, or just catch up. We look forward to seeing many of you there! Any questions, please get in touch with Urania Chiu at urania.chiu@law.ox.ac.uk.

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CSAE Research Workshop Week 3

May 7, 2024, 1 p.m.

Developing in vivo CRISPR system-based technologies to study clonal and malignant haemopoiesis

May 7, 2024, 1 p.m.

Hybrid Oxford Stroke Seminar - Rehabilitation Review - PFO audit data - post-acute stroke management

May 7, 2024, 1 p.m.

Title - PFO audit data - post-acute stroke management

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Neoclassical Growth in an Interdependent World

May 7, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

We generalize the open-economy neoclassical growth model to allow for trade and capital market frictions and imperfect substitutability of goods and capital across countries. The multi-country model is tractable, amenable to quantitative analysis, and matches key empirical patterns such as gravity equations in trade and capital holdings. The degree of integration in trade and capital markets and their interaction shape adjustments to shocks and the speed of convergence to steady state. The model is well-suited to study counterfactual changes in both trade and capital market frictions, such as a decoupling between the United States and China.

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Performing Sovereign Aspirations: Tamil Insurgency and Postwar Transition in Sri Lanka

May 7, 2024, 2 p.m.

In a society that experiences secessionist conflict, many things are not what they seem. The book presented in this talk (which is available open access via the CUP website) adopts a performative perspective to understand the peculiar institutional landscape the ensued around the Tamil separatist conflict in Sri Lanka, both during and after the civil war. It draws on two decades of fieldwork across towns and villages in northern and eastern Sri Lanka, ethnography within Sri Lanka’s civil service, and privileged access to Norwegian-facilitated peace process. This yields a compelling analytical narrative that shows how political institutions are enacted and witnessed, rather than cataloguing them in the strictures of the law. This provides a fertile vantage point to address the to-be-or-not-to-be dilemmas that we face when seeking to interpret the legitimacy, legality, and validity of the institutions that separatist movements create in aspiration of sovereign status. And as such, this book provides food for thought for broader conceptual debates concerning armed conflict and insurgency. Bart Klem writes about everyday life and politics amidst armed conflict and has conducted fieldwork across Sri Lanka’s northeast since 2000. He co-authored Checkpoint, Temple, Church and Mosque (Pluto 2015) and co-edited journal issues on insurgent politics (Modern Asian Studies 2018) and on legal identity under insurgencies (Citizenship Studies 2024).

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iSkills for Medical Sciences and OUH Trust: top tips for designing a conference poster

May 7, 2024, 2 p.m.

Are you planning to present a poster at an upcoming conference, meeting or symposium? This introductory session will provide you with some top tips on how to create a poster presentation which will help you to communicate your research project and data effectively. There will be guidance on formatting, layout, content, use of text, references and images, as well as advice on printing and presenting your poster. This session will also provide help with locating resources such as templates, free-to-use images and poster guidelines. By the end of this online session you will be able to: evaluate the effectiveness of templates, formatting, text and images; and plan, prepare and present your poster. Intended audience: students, staff and researchers from MSD and OUH.

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How can multi-stakeholder partnerships support refugees and migrants with irregular status in African intermediary cities?

May 7, 2024, 2 p.m.

The African continent is rapidly urbanizing. While this transformation has been well-documented, the focus of scholarship and policymakers has been predominantly on movements of refugees and migrants with (ir)regular status into major urban areas and capital cities. In contrast, intermediary cities have been largely absent in policy and academic debates between rural and metropolitan areas. Addressing this gap becomes all the more critical as African intermediary cities are increasingly impacted by mixed migration movements and (inter)national policies without necessarily having adequate legal mandates nor financial and human resources to accommodate and protect vulnerable refugees and migrants with irregular status. Some local authorities have begun to address such challenges by engaging in multi-stakeholder partnerships, bringing together local, national, and international actors. Based on research collaborations of the Equal Partnerships project with intermediary cities in Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Senegal, Tunisia and Uganda, this session explores central stakeholders, risks, and opportunities of such partnerships and presents policy recommendations for discussion. Zoom link: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIudOmuqDwiHdSIQR1jrk2tRuqloG123EoW

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iSkills: Research metrics and citation analysis tools: Part 1 what makes a journal a “top” journal?

May 7, 2024, 3 p.m.

In this session we will cover how to locate and interpret journal level metrics such as the Journal Impact Factor (JIF). We will examine the tools you can use to locate journal level metrics, such as Journal Citation Reports and Scopus Sources. We will also consider the uses, limitations and pitfalls inherent in these metrics and how they can be used responsibly. By the end of the session you will be familiar with: the main journal metrics; using Journal Citation Reports and CiteScore Journal Metrics to find journal impact factors; using Essential Science Indicators to find top research by articles, authors, institutions, countries and journals; and the issues and recommendations for using citation analysis to measure impact. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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From Speech to Emotion to Mood: Mental Health Modeling in Real-World Environments

May 7, 2024, 3 p.m.

Emotions provide critical cues into our health and wellbeing. This is of particular importance in the context of mental health, where changes in emotion may signify changes in symptom severity. However, information about emotion and how it varies over time is often accessible only using survey methodology (e.g., ecological momentary assessment, EMA), which can become burdensome to participants over time. Automated speech emotion recognition systems could provide an alternative, providing quantitative measures of emotion using acoustic data captured passively from a consented individual’s environment. However, speech emotion recognition systems often falter when presented with data collected from unconstrained natural environments due to issues with robustness, generalizability, and invalid assumptions. In this talk, I will discuss our journey in speech-centric mental health modeling, explaining whether, how, and when emotion recognition can be applied to natural unconstrained speech data to measure changes in mental health symptom severity.

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African Studies Centre Annual Lecture - Transnational Feminism in an Age of Genocide

May 7, 2024, 3 p.m.

Professor Amina Mama, 'Transnational Feminism in an Age of Genocide' The televised genocide in Gaza has made us all witnesses to the carnage occurring in occupied Palestine. How are we responding to our responsibilities as witnesses? How are women’s movements in formerly colonized African nations responding? What does feminist transnational analysis make visible? What forms of solidarity and activism are emerging in the face of massive and unrelenting state violence against a trapped population of civilian women, children, and men? What legacies of struggle can usefully inform such action? This lecture argues that the many violences perpetrated against women have been the major driver of feminist organizing in the South, and that this continues to be the case in relation to the transnational outrage over the carnage of the Israeli military campaign. Old and new anti-colonial feminist solidarities are being mobilized at multiple levels to join the global resistance demanding an end to the US-backed genocide.

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Approximate gradients for inference of partially-observed stochastic processes

May 7, 2024, 3:30 p.m.

Bayesian computation remains onerous at scale for inference under many discrete-valued stochastic process-based models, while these models remain ubiquitous across biology and public health. In this talk, we will explore how one can construct computationally efficient approximations to the gradient of the data likelihood under continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) models with respect to their high-dimensional parameters. CTMCs underpin the most popular models for learning about how rapidly evolving pathogens change over time and space to give rise to human infection, and the dimensionality of these problems are daunting. With these approximations in hand, a new variant of Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) becomes tractable to explore the parameter posterior, and we bound the approximation error using several small tricks from matrix analysis. This new sampling approach enables the introduction of a novel random-effects CTMC model that captures biological realism previously missing. Applied to the analysis of early SARS-CoV-2 genomes, the random-effects remove bias in inference of the location and timing of the pathogen's split-over into humans, while the approximate-gradient-based machinery is over an order of magnitude more time efficient than conventional sampling approaches.

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Title TBC

May 7, 2024, 4 p.m.

Reflections on Tunisian Women’s Continued Fight for Respect, Dignity and Rights

May 7, 2024, 4 p.m.

Policing the "British" in Paris during the French Revolutionary Terror

May 7, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Depletion and Economies of War and Peace

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Addressing a range of contemporary and historical conflicts and daily struggles, this series of talks will explore how violence remains integral to the global political economy, with lasting effects on gendered hierarchies which often extend far beyond immediate war zones.

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Why was the Soviet famine of 1946-7 the most severe in the Moldavian SSR? Preliminary conclusions based on Chișinău, Kyiv and Moscow archives

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Cyril Foster Lecture 2024: On the Declining Success of Civil Resistance

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Over the past 50 years, the Cyril Foster Lecture series has delivered engaging lectures from some of the world's most influential policymakers and academics. This year's lecture will be given by Professor Erica Chenoweth, a leading expert on mass movements, nonviolent resistance, terrorism, political violence, revolutions, and state repression. The lecture will be introduced by Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Dr Sir Michael Jacobs, and chaired by Cyril Foster Lecture Chair, Professor Neta Crawford. Professor Erica Chenoweth will explore the puzzling decline in the success of civil resistance movements in the past decade, even as unarmed movements have become more popular worldwide. The findings have implications for the future of nonviolent alternatives to armed struggle, as well as to the ability of pro-democratic movements to defeat authoritarian challenges. Erica Chenoweth is the Academic Dean for Faculty Engagement and the Frank Stanton Professor of the First Amendment at Harvard Kennedy School, Faculty Dean at Pforzheimer House at Harvard College, and a Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Harvard Radcliffe Institute. They study political violence and its alternatives. At Harvard, Chenoweth directs the Nonviolent Action Lab, an innovation hub that provides empirical evidence in support of movement-led political transformation. Event Schedule 4:30pm - 4:55pm: Registration 5pm prompt: The Cyril Foster Lecture 2024 will start; Opening remarks from Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Dr Sir Michael Jacobs Introduction to Professor Erica Chenoweth by Professor Neta Crawford Cyril Foster Lecture 2024: 'On the Declining Success of Civil Resistance' by Professor Erica Chenoweth Q&A, chaired by Professor Neta Crawford Closing remarks by Head of Department of Politics and International Relations, Professor Petra Schleiter 6:30pm - 7:30pm: Drinks Reception About the Cyril Foster Lecture Series This lecture series is the legacy of Cyril A Foster. We know very little about him. Mr Foster owned several small sweet shops in and around London and lived alone in Essex. On his death, he left a bequest to the University, asking us to create an annual lecture series on the ‘elimination of war and the better understanding of the nations of the world’. This wish is particularly unusual, as he had no previous connection to the University. His kind and generous gift continues to promote international cooperation. Previous speakers include prominent figures from the world of politics and policy, from prime ministers and foreign ministers, to secretary-generals of the United Nations and heads of major international organisations, as well as prominent academics. See the full list of past lectures at https://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/cyril-foster-lecture-series

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Energy Oxford Energy Seminar Series - Week 3 TT24: Leveraging the campus as a test bed for climate and sustainability leadership: Catalysing learning, imagination, and impact

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Future climate and sustainability leadership within higher education and at MIT seeks to transcend traditional academic silos and drive toward new ways of learning, innovation, collaboration and an unwavering commitment to address the urgent global challenges created by climate change.  Dr. Newman will present the model she launched at MIT built on a scales of impact foundation that recognizes that we cannot solve for sustainability within the walls of our campus alone, as we are completely integrated and reliant upon local, state, national, regional and global systems [from supply chain to policy to natural resources].  She will share how this involves a shift in organisational culture, values, and practices to align with the urgent need for climate action and environmental stewardship.

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Islam and Artificial Intelligence: Knowledge and Common Sense

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

The impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) on our lives prompts profound questions beyond the technical realm. While shaping the future of humanity, AI also challenges diverse worldviews, reducing rich human experiences to data analysis. This pragmatic lens can overshadow aspects of our reality, marginalizing or, at worst, destroying what isn't understood. Understanding is paramount because, in human-machine interactions, misunderstandings may harm only the vulnerable human side. With Islam being integral to many lives, its worldviews, imaginations, and values should be considered in AI development beyond simplistic pattern-recognition and statistical approaches. Therefore, it is important to consider the integration of Islamic epistemological perspectives into AI as a crucial aspect of future research.

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Reflections on Tunisian Women’s Continued Fight for Respect, Dignity and Rights

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Is this Time Different? Financial Follies across Centuries (with Jeremy Fouliard and Vania Stavrakeva)

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2024 - Lecture 2 - Witchcraft, Shrines, and Tindaanship

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Lecture 2 of the Evans-Pritchard Lecture series Witchcraft, Shrines, and Tindaanship All are welcome to attend in person or via the Teams ID and password below: Meeting ID: 318 331 790 674 Passcode: LEecHc

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Oxford Comics Network presents: James Parker: Navigating Pop Culture Retail: A Discussion of Comics and Trends

May 7, 2024, 5 p.m.

Comics industry buyer and trend-spotter James Parker opens up the world of comics as a business. James has been in comics retail for over twenty years and is one of the most respected figures in his field - and he's also a great speaker.

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What is literary history now? Recovering the premodern textual world in the 21st century

May 7, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

All welcome Refreshments

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Keeper of the Flame: Miyan Himmat Khan and the Last of the Mughal Emperors

May 7, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

James Skinner’s illustrated 1825 Persian-language Inventory of the Communities of Delhi, the Tashrīh al-Aqwām, includes a painting taken from life of Miyan Himmat Khan kalāwant (d.c.1840), the chief hereditary instrumental musician to the last Mughal emperors Akbar Shah (r.1806–37) and Bahadur Shah Zafar (r.1837–58). But the portrait was simultaneously intended as an ethnographic archetype: Skinner commissioned it to illustrate his entry on "the kalāwant community”, one of 104 distinct people groups he described. Skinner wrote in Persian, and drew on long-standing Indian traditions of writing on ethnographic “types”. But his work also played into the emergent British colonial knowledge project of categorising the communities they now ruled under the term “caste". At the same time, Skinner’s entry is wholly unreconcilable with Himmat Khan’s own musical biography and intellectual output—a co-written music treatise, the Asl al-Usūl (Foundations of Rhythm), which presents a revolutionary modern conceptualisation of the Hindustani tāl (metrical) system. In order to untangle this socio-musical knot, I will juxtapose late Mughal and Conmpany-style ethnographic paintings and written descriptions in Persian, Urdu, Hindi, and English against a new wave of Persian, Urdu and Hindi music-technical works composed c. 1780–1850. The latter reveal the emergence of a paracolonial indigenous modernity in the most authoritative centres of North Indian art-music production, Delhi and Lucknow, running alongside and beyond colonial knowledge projects at the end of the East India Company’s tenure in India.

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Moving and building: local government and the climate challenge

May 7, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Local governments are at the core of two of the UK’s biggest climate challenges: transportation and buildings and infrastructure. How can the UK both improve and green transport so that we can all get around more easily while meeting our climate targets? At the same time, we know that addressing climate change requires rapid infrastructure development. But many studies show that building in the UK is slower and more expensive than in other countries. How do we build what we need without losing what is important? What can local leaders do to deliver on these imperatives, and what support do they need for national government to be successful?

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Introduction to Presentation Skills (in-person)

May 8, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the session, participants will have:  Developed an awareness of what makes a presentation effective.  Understood why planning and practice are crucial to the success of a presentation.  The confidence to choose and use a variety of techniques to engage the audience.  Practiced delivering a short presentation and gained constructive feedback. INTENDED FOR PGR and Research Staff with limited experience of giving presentations.

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iSkills: Data Sources for Research - Discovery, Access and Use

May 8, 2024, 10 a.m.

Modern researchers need to have an up-to-date understanding of working with research data. This relates equally to the material they create themselves and that obtained from other sources. Academic institutions, funding bodies and even publishers are now expecting competence in these issues. This workshop will provide a grounding in the different ways quantitative and qualitative data is being made available to benefit researchers. By the end of the session you will also have some insight into how your own future work could add to the process and become part of the research discourse. The course aims to provide an overview of macro and micro data sources available at the University of Oxford, including national data archives, subscription services, business data, and offers some pointers for further searching. Topics to be covered will include: overview of the landscape of data sources for health researchers, social scientists and most other researchers; how to obtain macro and micro data via specific sources; qualitative and quantitative data resources; additional data services such as the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), Eurostat, Researchfish and the Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative's online interactive databank and global Multidimensional Poverty Index; plus specialist sources for business and economic data subscribed to by Oxford University; the value of resources for informing research design and methodological innovation; and the importance of data management and cybersecurity. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Title TBC

May 8, 2024, 11 a.m.

Adolescent experience and a putative sensitive period for learning and decision making in mice

May 8, 2024, 11 a.m.

There is growing interest in the concept of an ‘adolescent sensitive period,’ but this phrase can mean many things. This concept can be explored in laboratory mice by manipulating experience during development and testing behavioral or brain function in adulthood. Another approach is to compare adolescent versus adult learning and brain function to look for adolescent gain of function. In my talk, I will share what we have learned using both approaches. I then hope to engage the audience in discussion of the idea that an adolescent sensitive period may exist in rodents for learning and decision making (and fronto-basal ganglia circuit function) to support adaptive foraging behavior (Lin et al., 2020;2022).

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CHG Lunchtime Lab Talks: Taylor and Lu Groups

May 8, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Taylor Group 12:30-13:00 Speaker(s): TBC Title(s): TBC Lu Group 13:00-13:30 Speaker(s): Adam Norton-Steele Title(s): "Identifying phenotype-genotype-function coupling in live-cell imaging using SPOT"

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Slack and Economic Development TBC

May 8, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Slack -- the underutilization of factors of production -- varies systematically with development. Using novel and detailed measures of the utilization of labour, capital, and input factors overall from a large representative sample of firms in rural and urban Kenya, we show that utilization is increasing in firm size, market access, and local GDP per capita. We argue that indivisibilities of inputs are a key driver of capacity underutilization in poor economies. We present a model of capacity choice where firms face indivisibilities in at least one input. Embedded in spatial general equilibrium, the model rationalizes the endogenous emergence of slack in steady state, and generates important predictions for macroeconomic dynamics in low- and middle-income economies. We validate the model using reduced-form estimates of the general equilibrium effects of cash transfers from a large-scale RCT in Western Kenya. We provide transparency and innovate methodologically by pre-registering parts of our structural estimation routine. Consistent with the model, the data show that (1) supply curves are highly elastic, (2) output responses to demand shocks are substantially larger for low-utilization sectors and firms, (3) aggregate inflation in response to the cash transfer shock is low but there exists some inflation in higher-demand regions. The findings suggest that input indivisibilities are a key friction in developing settings, rationalizing the existence of large transfer multipliers in poor economies. Written with Tilman Graff, Edward Miguel, Felix Samy Soliman, Nachiket Shah, Michael Walker

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Session 3: Co-creation and stakeholder engagement for impact in an Agile Sprint (online webinar)

May 8, 2024, 1 p.m.

Learn about effective strategies for continuous co-design of your research with key stakeholders for policy-oriented impact. This workshop is open to: Oxford University researchers planning to develop an Agile Sprint; Oxford University researchers working on other applied research projects who wish to learn about effective ongoing co-creation with key stakeholders and engagement with new stakeholders to shape research for policy impact; previous Agile Sprint researchers wishing to review their experience of co-creation and planning for impact for use in the future. Agile Sprints are designed to provide environmental research answers to time-critical policy problems in a way that enables rapid uptake of findings by decision-makers. You will benefit from learning from previous Agile Sprints on how to manage the co-creation process all the way through the research project to get the best input and engagement from a range of stakeholders to help shape your research and outputs for rounded policy impact. By the end of this workshop, you will understand: The relationship between the pre-Sprint co-creation process and ongoing co-creation during the Sprint to remain policy focused, facilitate knowledge exchange between researchers and stakeholders, and shape outputs based on decision-maker needs How to identify gaps in your stakeholder networks to draw in further expertise and round out the policy relevance at regional and local scale where applicable, including communities impacted by the policy considerations How to determine within your team who has the experience, knowledge, and relationships to engage effectively with government, and how to support colleagues with strengthening engagement and relationship-building How to weave the co-creation process into your Sprint research and milestones, and plan for a primary policy-focused output supported by a primary academic output. “Policy cycles typically run to much shorter and unpredictable timescales than academic research, and policymakers seeking evidence often want the best available answer at the time. Strategic engagement and co-creation are key to ensuring that your research has timely impact – the Agile Sprints are designed to run on this principle without compromising on the quality of academic output.” -Dr Anupama Sen Book your place on the workshop using the links provided. If you need to cancel your place, please do so no later than 48 hours before the workshop. By booking on this workshop, you have agreed to the externally facing use of the recording. Book another session, by viewing the series event page. Participation: Please note you will be expected to actively participate, which includes joining discussion, listening, asking questions, and contributing to activities.

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iSkills: Online sources for historians

May 8, 2024, 2 p.m.

A general online introduction to the vast range of electronic resources which are available for all historical periods of British and Western European history. Learning outcomes are to: gain an overview of some of the key online resources for Medieval, Early Modern and Modern British and Western European History; know how to access subscription resources and gain awareness of key examples of useful resources including bibliographic databases, reference sources, primary sources, maps, audio-visual resources, and data sources. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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TBD

May 8, 2024, 2 p.m.

Emerging RNA virus aberrant replication: the interface between immune sensing and viral replication strategies

May 8, 2024, 2 p.m.

Oxford Technology & Security Nexus - Taiwan's satellite production & geopolitics

May 8, 2024, 3 p.m.

This week, Yi-Ting Chang will be speaking about Engineering the state: Taiwan's satellite production amid geopolitical tensions Satellite technology has proven crucial for states that find themselves at the forefront of inter-state conflict and war. However, it is as yet little understood what role such technology has played for those polities that lack recognition. Focusing on FORMOSAT-5, Taiwan's first locally manufactured high-resolution Earth observation satellite launched in 2017, this article examines global satellite equipment regulations and domestic engineers' efforts. Contrary to existing state-building literature which emphasizes the de facto state’s dependency on a patron state, ethnographic research at TASA reveals that engineers are actively developing technological autonomy to strategically navigate the power dynamics between Taiwan and the Western countries. This article emphasizes the often-overlooked role of engineers in shaping the geo- and astropolitics by highlighting their role in nation-building and outer space geopolitics. About the speaker Yi-Ting Chang is a PhD candidate at Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment. Her broad research interests lie in critical geopolitics and science and technology studies. She has been working on vertical geo-politics, focusing especially on power, body, materiality, and infrastructure in the three-dimensional world. She is a founding member of the Taiwan Space Generation (TSG) and a pivotal figure within the TSG Reporter Team. In September 2023, she co-convened “Off-Earth Geopolitics,” a workshop at the University of Oxford. Her DPhil thesis aims to investigate Taiwan's outer space history and politics against the backdrop of the ongoing cross-strait tension. Her PhD is fully funded by Clarendon Fund Scholarship with joint partnerships with St. John's College and the Taiwan-Oxford Scholarship. She obtained her BA from National Taiwan Normal University (graduate with honour) and MSc from National Taiwan University (with an awarded thesis).

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Cancer Vaccines joint 'Oxford Cancer Immuno-Oncology Network' and 'Oxford Immunology Network' seminar with networking drinks

May 8, 2024, 3 p.m.

2 x 25 minutes seminars followed by networking drinks Benoit Van Den Eynde; TBC César López-Camacho: Advancing mRNA Vaccine Technologies at University of Oxford

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The Power of Personality Diversity

May 8, 2024, 3 p.m.

Join us for a captivating 60-minute seminar as we delve into the world of personality diversity in academia. From unlocking the power of confident communication for introverts to effectively managing diverse teams, this talk will equip you with practical strategies for success. Learn how to navigate challenging academic environments, attract diverse talent, and create relationships that stand the test of time. Discover the secrets to thriving under pressure, developing well-being rituals, and ensuring that every voice is heard in academic spaces. Don't miss this opportunity to gain valuable insights into the nuanced dynamics of personality diversity and how it shapes success in academia.

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British politics - what just happened and what’s next?

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

The week after the May 2024 local elections will be an ideal time to take stock of British politics. The results of the locals will provide key clues as to the outcome of the general election due by January 2025. If that general election has already happened, then there will be even more to analyse, and a key moment to ask: what comes next for Britain? Join our expert panel chaired by Trinity’s Fellow and Tutor in Politics, Professor Stephen Fisher, who is also a long-standing BBC Election Night analyst.

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Philosophical narratives and the formation of national culture: the case of the Leibnizian-Wolffian tradition

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

Historical research in the time of the Anthropocene: can climate data help us read the past (and, if so, how)?

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

Over the past few decades historians have investigated paleoclimate data seeking answers to long-standing questions in the premodern world that may be linked to climate variability. At the same time, scientists have sought to find in historical knowledge keys to better understand the impact of climate on societies. Have these collaborations enhanced our understanding of climate’s role in shaping the human past? In this talk, Professor Di Cosmo, Luce Foundation Professor in East Asian Studies in Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, will examine the results yielded by interdisciplinary research on climate and history, and the issues they raise in terms of methodology, theoretical assumptions, and the general goals of a climatic “turn" in historical research. This is a joint event with the Oxford Martin Programme on Changing Global Orders, the Oxford Centre for European History and the Oxford Centre for Global History. Please note this event is online-only.

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Critical data studies with Latin America: Theorizing beyond data colonialism

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

The article aims to theorize about critical data studies with Latin America beyond the framework of data colonialism, arguing that the long history of social thought in the region can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the datafication. It discusses views around dependence, oppressions, and liberation, debating how Latin American authors can be useful for current critical data studies, in a more nuanced and complex vision. It presents the theoretical contributions of Lelia Gonzalez, dependency theorists and Enrique Dussel. Dependency theorists criticize evolutionary frameworks of development and can contribute to discussions around data sovereignty and overexploitation of labor. Gonzalez contributes to a complex vision of Amefrica Ladina, articulating multiple forms of oppression. Enrique Dussel presents a theory of technology considering totality and proposes an ethics of liberation that can be related to alternatives toward data justice and data commons. All theoretical frameworks contribute to thinking about datafication with Latin America not as an isolated phenomenon, but in relation to other countries in the world, and as an analytical key for the construction of alternatives. All perspectives are related to current debates on critical data studies and can make an important contribution to the construction of critical theories about data that consider Latin America also as a site of knowledge production.

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Humanitarian extractivism: the digital transformation past, present, future

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

For details see https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/humanitarian-extractivism-the-digital-transformation-past-present-future

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Chinggis Khan’s Empire Restored? The Conquests of Tamerlane in a Mongol Perspective

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

The Damascus Events Book Launch

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

Book Launch: Merze Tate: The Global Odyssey of a Black Woman Scholar

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

Barbara Savage presents a powerful and inspiring biography of Merze Tate (1905–1996), a trailblazing Black woman scholar and world traveller. Born in rural Michigan during the Jim Crow era, the bold and irrepressible Merze Tate (1905–1996) refused to limit her intellectual ambitions, despite living in what she called a “sex and race discriminating world”. Against all odds, through her brilliance and hard work Tate earned degrees in international relations from Oxford (1935) and a doctorate in government from Harvard (1941). She then joined the faculty of Howard University, where she taught for three decades of a long life spanning the tumultuous twentieth century. Tate was one of the few black women academics of her generation and a prolific scholar with a wide range of interests. This book revives and critiques Tate's prolific and prescient body of scholarship, with topics ranging from nuclear arms limitations to race and imperialism in Asia, the Pacific, and Africa. Her quest for adventure took her on extensive trips throughout Europe, as well as around the world twice, traveling solo with her cameras in hand. Tate credited her success to other women, Black and white, who help her realize her dream of becoming a scholar. Barbara Savage’s lucid and skilled rendering of Tate’s story is built on more than a decade of research. Tate’s life and work challenge provincial approaches to African American and American history, women's history, the history of education, diplomatic history, and international thought.

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Historical research in the time of the Anthropocene: can climate data help us read the past (and, if so, how)?

May 8, 2024, 5 p.m.

Over the past few decades historians have investigated paleoclimate data seeking answers to long-standing questions the premodern world that may be linked to climate variability. At the same time, scientists have sought to find in historical knowledge keys to better understand the impact of climate on societies. Have these collaborations enhanced our understanding of climate’s role in shaping the human past? This talk will examine the results yielded by interdisciplinary research on climate and history, and the issues they raise in terms of methodology, theoretical assumptions, and the general goals of a climatic “turn" in historical research. *Nicola Di Cosmo* is the Luce Foundation Professor in East Asian Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton, USA) since 2003. He received his PhD from the Department of Uralic and Altaic Studies (now Central Eurasian Studies) at Indiana University in 1991, and held research and teaching positions at the University of Cambridge, Harvard University, and the University of Canterbury (New Zealand). His main field of research is the history of the relations between China and Inner Asia from prehistory to the modern period. Within that broad area he has published widely on the history (political, military, and economic) of China’s relations with steppe nomads, and on Mongol and Manchu history. His most recent works explore the use of proxy data from climatology and other palaeosciences in the study of China and Central Asia, with special reference to early Eurasian nomads, the Mongol empire, and the Qing dynasty. Most recently, he has collaborated with climatologists and archaeologists in the research project "Volcanoes-Climate-History" at ZiF (Zentrum für interdisziplinäre Forschung, Bielefeld University, Germany) from 2021 to 2024. _This talk is organised in conjunction with the Oxford Centre for European History and the Centre for Global History._

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Prof Simon Coleman | Lecture 2 'Spirit and Blood: Between Communitas and Kinship’

May 8, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Lecture Two ‘Spirit and Blood: Between Communitas and Kinship’ [Wednesday 8 May, from 5:15 to 6:45 pm, Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel College] The Turnerian concept of existential communitas famously presents the pilgrim as temporary stranger to the world, disciplined within liminal or liminoid spaces to render the self open to universal and anonymized others. Blood yields to spirit, friendship to fellowship, presaging later anthropological concerns—especially in studies of both Christianity and modernity—over inherent conflicts between mediation and transcendence. In this lecture, I reverse these analytical polarities, emphasizing the significance of intimate intersections and calibrations between pilgrimage and kinship, the spiritual and the social, optation and obligation. Exploring blood as central metaphor of connectedness and flow as well as sacrifice, I present a vision of pilgrimage as ritualized, embodied refraction of relations among kin, whether living or dead.

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Place and Memory: The Aesthetics of Constructing the Past

May 8, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

This term’s Fiction and Other Minds seminar will be hosting Prof John Sutton to discuss the topic of Place and Memory: The Aesthetics of Constructing the Past. Traces of many past events are sometimes layered or superposed, in brain, body, and world alike. This is one reason that relations between place and memory are complex and often hard to manage, as we access many past events and coexisting emotions. Cognitive philosophy, memory studies, and the arts alike are increasingly concerned with the difficulties of engaging appropriately with places with multiple or difficult pasts. In this paper, Sutton sketches a provisional aesthetics of superposition and urban palimpsests: case studies include Norman Klein's multimedia fiction Bleeding Through: Layers of Los Angeles, Janet Cardiff's site-specific urban audio walks, and William Kentridge's short films. John Sutton is Leverhulme International Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Stirling, and in 2022–2023 was a fellow at the Paris Institute for Advanced Study. His work addresses memory, skill, and collaboration, and integrates conceptual, experimental, and ethnographic methods. With Kath Bicknell, he coedited Collaborative Embodied Performance: Ecologies of Skill (Bloomsbury, 2022). Topics of his recent papers include joint expertise, creativity in film-making, and cognitive change in the Neolithic period. About the Seminar Series: The Fiction and Other Minds seminar series showcases current research in the Cognitive Humanities by hosting scholars working at the interface between literary studies, visual and performance art, phenomenology, philosophy, and the cognitive sciences. The seminars explore how features investigated by the cognitive sciences can be tested and expanded across different cultural contexts, media, and artistic genres. In particular, we explore how literary texts often challenge and differentiate theoretical insights—especially through their attention to the culturally situated aspects of cognition—and how cognitively informed approaches to literature can deepen our understanding of the embodied and affective processes that underpin meaning-making, including literary reading.

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Fiction and Other Minds: Place and Memory: The Aesthetics of Constructing the Past

May 8, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

This term’s Fiction and Other Minds seminar will be hosting Prof John Sutton to discuss the topic of Place and Memory: The Aesthetics of Constructing the Past. Traces of many past events are sometimes layered or superposed, in brain, body, and world alike. This is one reason that relations between place and memory are complex and often hard to manage, as we access many past events and coexisting emotions. Cognitive philosophy, memory studies, and the arts alike are increasingly concerned with the difficulties of engaging appropriately with places with multiple or difficult pasts. In this paper, Sutton sketches a provisional aesthetics of superposition and urban palimpsests: case studies include Norman Klein's multimedia fiction Bleeding Through: Layers of Los Angeles, Janet Cardiff's site-specific urban audio walks, and William Kentridge's short films. John Sutton is Leverhulme International Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Stirling, and in 2022–2023 was a fellow at the Paris Institute for Advanced Study. His work addresses memory, skill, and collaboration, and integrates conceptual, experimental, and ethnographic methods. With Kath Bicknell, he coedited Collaborative Embodied Performance: Ecologies of Skill (Bloomsbury, 2022). Topics of his recent papers include joint expertise, creativity in film-making, and cognitive change in the Neolithic period. The seminar is convened by Professor Ben Morgan (ben.morgan@worc.ox.ac.uk) and Dr Naomi Rokotnitz (naomi.rokotnitz@worc.ox.ac.uk). As always, the talk will be followed by drinks for all attendees. https://occt.web.ox.ac.uk/event/fiction-and-other-minds-place-and-memory-the-aesthetics-of-constructing-the-past

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Creative Writing Seminar Series - Camille Ralphs - "An instrument and a human being": The poet in history

May 8, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Camille Ralphs is a poet, critic and editor. Her first book, After You Were, I Am, was published by Faber and Faber in March 2024. Her poems and translations have appeared in magazines including the New York Review of Books, The Poetry Review, The Spectator and The London Magazine, and she has released three pamphlets: Malkin (2015), which was shortlisted for the Michael Marks Award; uplifts & chains (2020); and Daydream College for Bards (2023). She writes critical articles for outlets and publications including The Poetry Foundation, The Telegraph, The Poetry Review and the Los Angeles Review of Books, produces a regular column for Poetry London and conducts an interview series for Poetry Birmingham Literary Journal. Camille is the Poetry Editor at the Times Literary Supplement.

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Principal's Conversations: Con Coughlin

May 8, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Please join John Bowers KC and the Oxford International Relations Society for a Principal's Conversation entitled 'Ukraine and Gaza: the challenges for Western Democracy', with Brasenose College alumnus, Con Coughlin. Con Coughlin is Defence and Foreign Affairs Editor at the Daily Telegraph and a world-renowned expert on the Middle East and global security issues. He is the author of several critically-acclaimed books, including Saddam: The Secret Life and Winston Churchill's First War: Young Winston at War with the Afghans. He also writes for The Wall Street Journal and The Atlantic Monthly.

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Get that fellowship (in-person)

May 9, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this session you will understand more about:  What experience and characteristics you need to have to gain a fellowship.  The application process.  How to work with University’s systems and procedures to optimise your application and its chance of success.  You will have an opportunity to practice interviewing/being interviewed for fellowship applications.

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Open scholarship: introduction to persistent identifiers

May 9, 2024, 10 a.m.

Persistent Identifiers (PID’s) provide a consistent way of digitally referencing items that aims to be more reliable than a simple web address. This is important for scholarly communications because citation and attribution are essential elements of scholarly apparatus. This course will introduce you to the concept of Persistent Identifiers, the problems that they address, and how they can be used in the academic environment to simplify some tasks. It will examine several different types of identifier, some of which are currently widely used (DOI’s for publications/data and ORCID’s for researchers) and others which are emerging in importance. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Baptists and Biblical Scholarship: Historical and Contemporary Reflections.

May 9, 2024, 10 a.m.

Baptists care about the Bible, believing it is of utmost importance that the Bible is read and interpreted—as a source of faith and guidance for the church. Baptists have produced a number of notable biblical scholars, especially in the twentieth century, whose work has been widely read and influential in the academy. Some were appointed professors in their field in Manchester, King’s College London, and in the US. This one-day conference will focus on how Baptists have contributed to biblical scholarship and how this has been, and is still today, received by the academy and the church. Free lunch and hot drinks included.

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Spatial effects in models of solid tumour growth and control

May 9, 2024, 11 a.m.

Extrachromosomal oncogene amplifications in cancer

May 9, 2024, noon

Extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) has been recognized as one of the most frequent causes of oncogene amplification in cancer. Its association with worse patient outcomes suggests that it may directly contribute to malignant cell phenotypes. This has been linked to increased oncogene dosage because both oncogenes and associated enhancers can occupy ecDNA. New data challenge the view that only oncogene dosage is affected by ecDNA, and raises the possibility that ecDNA could disrupt genome-wide gene expression. Recent investigations suggest that ecDNA localizes to specialized nuclear bodies (hubs) in which they can act in trans as ectopic enhancers for genes on other ecDNA or chromosomes. Moreover, ecDNA can reintegrate into the genome, possibly further disrupting the gene regulatory landscape in tumor cells. I will discuss the emerging properties of ecDNA and highlight promising avenues to exploit this new knowledge for the development of ecDNA-directed therapies for cancer.

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OUCAGS Forum - 'Experiences Guiding Health Policy'

May 9, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

We will have a plenary session with a talk by Professor Amanda Adler, Professor of Diabetic Medicine and Health Policy, Director of Diabetes Trials Unit, University of Oxford

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Navigating the AI tool landscape: understanding the tools that will best support your teaching aims

May 9, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

There are more and more tools being released. This session will cover the current AI tool landscape with respect to reading and writing as well as principles for evaluating and choosing tools. It will cover: - The big 4 chatbots: how to decide between ChatGPT and one of its competitors - Chatbot or a dedicated tool: how to choose the right tool for the job - Components of AI tools: what questions to ask when choosing a tool - Differences between chatbots and image generations tools - Examples of different tools in action.

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Getting Started with Public Engagement with Research (online)

May 9, 2024, 1 p.m.

COURSE DETAILS Engagement describes the ways in which we can share our research and its value by interacting with wider public audiences, generating mutual benefit. In this introductory session tailored to those new to engagement, we look at what public engagement is and some of the reasons why you might want to do it. We’ll highlight the multitude of different approaches you can take, and provide tips on getting started and where to get support. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the session, participants will have:  The ability to reflect on individual strengths and areas for growth in public engagement.  An increased and reinforced understanding of what public engagement with research is.  An increased awareness of what makes effective engagement.  An increased awareness of the range of opportunities available locally & nationally, and who to contact. INTENDED FOR DPhil, Research Staff, MSD & MPLS

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Medical Grand Rounds - Week 5: Psychological Medicine

May 9, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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Title TBC

May 9, 2024, 2 p.m.

Transfer of Status Presentations

May 9, 2024, 2 p.m.

*Gabrielle Davies*, ‘Building the New Wales?: National Identities and the Politics of Post-war Reconstruction in Second World War Wales’ *Thomas Wang*, ‘Vitalizing the Heritage: Tradition and Conservatism in Cold War Britain, 1944-1990’ *Carys Howell*, ‘The 1956 Hungarian Refugee Crisis: Local, National and International Responses, 1956-1960’

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Global Lines and Nautical Cartography in the Iberian Oceanic Expansion

May 9, 2024, 2 p.m.

Open scholarship: foundations of copyright for teaching

May 9, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

This workshop will cover the basics of copyright as they apply to lecturers and tutors at the University of Oxford. It will explain the different types of copyright work that are used or generated in teaching and the rights and responsibilities for teaching staff and students. By attending this session you will have the opportunity to: identify copyright works and usages in teaching contexts; compare different types of licence available for teaching – proprietary and open; follow the requirements of the CLA licence; and apply risk management principles to the use of copyright exceptions for teaching. Intended audience: Oxford students, academics and other staff.

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The Governance of Migration Data in Africa: Lessons from Different Initiatives: the African Union Migration Observatories and the African Migration Data Network

May 9, 2024, 3:45 p.m.

SIR HANS KREBS PRIZE LECTURE: TITLE TBC

May 9, 2024, 4 p.m.

TBC SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Professor Andrew Hattersley is the Professor of Molecular Medicine at the University of Exeter, UK and a practicing consultant diabetologist at the Royal Devon and Exeter hospital. He trained in Medicine at the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford. His postgraduate education was in London, Oxford and Birmingham. Working with Professor Sian Ellard he has taken Exeter from being a centre with no genetics laboratory in 1995 to now being the top international laboratory for monogenic diabetes with over 25,000 referrals from 108 countries. They have discovered 27 genes which when mutated cause monogenic diabetes.Importantly he has gone on from gene discovery to find the best treatment for monogenic diabetes. He has shown that the commonest forms of both familial genetic diabetes and neonatal diabetes can be treated with tablets instead of insulin resulting in better blood sugar control. Recent work has focused on “Precision Diabetes” identifying subgroups in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes with different treatment responses. He has published over 600 papers with over 110,000 citations, given over 350 national and international lecturers and received many international and national awards for his work including being appointed as a fellow of The Royal Society and being awarded a CBE.

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OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Five

May 9, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Five: How Did the COVID Pandemic Response Harm Society? A Global Evaluation and State of Knowledge Review (2020-21) Presenter: Dr Kevin Bardosh, Collateral Global, University of Edinburgh and University of Washington Discussant: Dr Yuxi Zhang, University College London Investigating the Typologies and Timeliness of COVID-19 Social Policy Responses Across Countries Presenter: Steven Kuan-Ju Chen, Cadmus International UK Ltd/ National Taiwan University Discussant: Dr Philipp Trein, University of Lausanne The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 16:00-17:30 BST.

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Red Squirrels, Big Data, and the Birth of Behavioral Ecology

May 9, 2024, 4 p.m.

Red Squirrels in the Yukon harvest pinecones and stash them in large middens that they consume over several years. When one squirrels dies, another can inherit their stash. The same might be said of scientists and their archives of behavioral data built on decades of research, whether on squirrels such as these or various other species around the world. Even projects led by a single charismatic individual are sustained through intricate collaborative networks of students, postdocs, and collaborators. Negotiating these networks required establishing norms of data sharing between experts trained in different fields and at different stages of their careers. This talk explores social shifts within this community to computerized records in the 1980s and then the disparate reactions among scientists over calls for open-data sharing in the 1990s and 2000s.

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Title TBC - Methods in Social Policy and Intervention Research

May 9, 2024, 4 p.m.

TBC Booking is required for people outside of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI). The registration form will be available soon. DSPI members do not need to register

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When Does Love Make a Baby?

May 9, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

A series of three public lectures, by Professor Elizabeth Harman (in-person only). Lecture 3 of 3. What does love teach us about abortion? How does love challenge our ideas about abortion? How can love explain the importance of abortion?

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The Fêting Court: Festivals as Tools for Diplomacy at the French Court

May 9, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

‘Black Internationalism's Politics of Land’

May 9, 2024, 4:45 p.m.

This paper draws out those structures of solidarity and global visions of Black freedom articulated around the event of the 1974 Sixth Pan African Congress in Dar es Salaam and the identification of industrial agriculture as a central pillar of Black liberation. As Quito Swan notes in his analysis of the call for 6PAC, organizers positioned technological innovation in relation to cultivation practices as a central path towards economic self-reliance. But the question of land use drew the attention of writers who lived and travelled in and around East Africa at this historical juncture. This paper draws on the work of Keorapetse Kgositsile, who was involved in the early planning of 6PAC and Gwendolyn Brooks, who travelled to Tanzania three years prior to the Congress and collaborated with artists and poets who subsequently made contributions to 6PAC as a way to consider how poetry confronts the contradictions inherent to political investments in economic planning. Through a focus on those circuits of exchange this paper seeks to develop a theory of global solidarity structured around competing claims about the potential of land and plot to facilitate economic, political, and creative freedom on a global scale.

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Lizzie Swarbrick, University of Edinburgh - “A fag end of the international medieval tradition”? – The Quality and Worth of Scottish Pre-Reformation Churches

May 9, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Week 3 Lizzie Swarbrick, University of Edinburgh 9 May “A fag end of the international medieval tradition”? – The Quality and Worth of Scottish Pre-Reformation Churches Offered by the Faculties of History and Theology and Religion. For more information, or for the Teams link to join remotely, please contact sarah.apetrei@campion.ox.ac.uk.

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Scents of China: A Modern History of Smell

May 9, 2024, 5 p.m.

Xuelei Huang will introduce her new book, which presents a vivid and highly original reading of recent Chinese history through an eclectic array of smells that permeated Chinese life from the High Qing through to the Mao period. Utilising interdisciplinary methodology and critically engaging with scholarship in the expanding fields of sensory and smell studies, she shows how this period of tumultuous change in China was experienced through the body and the senses. Drawing on unexplored archival materials, readers are introduced to the 'smellscapes' of China from the eighteenth to mid-twentieth century via perfumes, food, body odours, public health projects, consumerism and cosmetics, travel literature, fiction and political language. This pioneering and evocative study takes the reader on a sensory journey through modern Chinese history, examining the ways in which the experience of scent and modernity have intertwined. Dr Xuelei Huang is Senior Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research focuses on sensory history, film history and media culture in modern China. Her publications include Scents of China: A Modern History of Smell (Cambridge, 2023), Shanghai Filmmaking: Crossing Borders, Connecting to the Globe, 1922–1938 (Brill, 2014), Sensing China: Modern Transformations of Sensory Culture (co-edited with Shengqing Wu, Routledge, 2022), and journal articles in Modern Asian Studies, Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, Twentieth-Century China, and Journal of Chinese Cinemas, among others. She is the recipient of the Ruprecht Karls Prize for Best Dissertation in Heidelberg, an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship, and grants from the Gerda Henkel Foundation, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

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Waiting Time Prioritisation in the Health Sector: Evidence from Hip Replacement Surgery

May 9, 2024, 5 p.m.

Helen Oyeyemi: Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture

May 9, 2024, 5 p.m.

Each year the Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture is given by notable creative writers and remembers Richard Hillary, the author of The Last Enemy, who was a student at Trinity. Helen Oyeyemi is an award-winning novelist and a former judge of the International Booker Prize for Literature. Described by The Guardian as “a rare talent”, Helen is best known for Mr Fox, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours and Gingerbread.

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Surgical Grand Rounds - Oncology

May 10, 2024, 8 a.m.

Coffee, Tea and pastries will be served in the Lecture Theatre. Please email Louise King (louise.king@nds.ox.ac.uk) if you would like to attend online.

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Title TBC

May 10, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Title TBC

May 10, 2024, 11 a.m.

External Seminar: “Novel advances in targeting the DNA damage response in the Clinic”

May 10, 2024, noon

Dr. Timothy Yap is a Medical Oncologist and Physician-Scientist based at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre. He is a Professor in the Department for Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (Phase I Program), and the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology. Dr. Yap is Vice President and Head of Clinical Development in the Therapeutics Discovery Division, a drug discovery biopharmaceutical division where drug discovery and clinical translation are seamlessly integrated. He is also the Associate Director of Translational Research in the Khalifa Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy, which is an integrated research and clinical trials program aimed at implementing personalized cancer therapy and improving patient outcomes. Dr. Yap’s main research focuses on the first-in-human and combinatorial development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies, and their acceleration through clinical studies using novel predictive and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. His main interests include the targeting of the DNA damage response (DDR) with novel therapeutics, such as ATR, PARP1, WEE1, POLQ, USP1, PKMYT1, PARG, CHK1, ATM and DNA-PK inhibitors, next generation CDK2, CDK4 and CDK7-selective inhibitors, YAP/TEAD inhibitors, Werner helicase inhibitors, SMARCA2 degraders, as well as the development of novel immunotherapeutics.

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Tracing the fossil, genomic and mineral footprints of Earth’s microbial past

May 10, 2024, noon

The interplay among environmental chemistry, organismal evolution and microbial stress responses contributed to the preservation of a nearly 3.5 billion-year long record of microbial life by silica, carbonate and clay minerals. In this talk, I will use the genomic and fossil records of Cyanobacteria, the organismal lineage with the oldest fossil record, to ask when this photosynthetic lineage evolved the critical ability to produce oxygen. I will then present results of experimental work that shows the ability of cyanobacteria to promote their own fossilization by precipitating silica and carbonate minerals. These results help constrain the concentrations of silica in marine environments more than two billion years ago, explain the preservation of exquisite cyanobacterial fossils in chert lenses associated with Proterozoic carbonate deposits and can inform the search for signs of past life on Mars.

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Bradyarrhythmias: New mechanisms and treatments

May 10, 2024, 1 p.m.

Cardiac conduction system (CCS) disease is common, as are arrhythmias arising from the diseased CCS. Current therapy is limited to palliation by surgical implantation of a pacemaker or an intracardiac device, and in order to provide refined therapeutic strategies and better risk prediction for arrhythmic events, there is a need for an improved working understanding of how electrical excitability is regulated. In this seminar I will demonstrate how our laboratory has taken an active lead in the identification of new cellular pathways in the control of CCS electrophysiology, focusing on recent advances we have made in understanding dysfunctional pacemaking in endurance athletes, in aged and failing hearts, and in elucidating the circadian control of arrhythmogenesis. I will illustrate how epigenetic and transcriptional control mechanisms modulate pacemaker electrophysiology in these scenarios and delve into work we are currently undertaking towards translation of new fundamental insight on ion channel modulation into therapies for CCS disease and related arrhythmias. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Alicia D’Souza is a Reader in Cardiac Electrophysiology at the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London. Alicia’s research focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which ion channels in the hearts electrical wiring system are controlled. Trained as a cardiac physiologist during her PhD (2012), Alicia completed postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Professor Mark Boyett at the University of Manchester investigating pacemaking in endurance athletes. Subsequently she was awarded a BHF Intermediate Fellowship in 2019 during which she established an independent research group that has advanced understanding of the cellular mechanisms that underlie conduction system function in health and in disease. Alicia’s work has been popularised in the media and led to numerous awards including the International Society for Heart Research/SERVIER Fellowship Prize, the (inaugural) Cairn Research ‘New and Notable’ Prize Lecture and The Physiological Society’s (inaugural) R Jean Banister Prize Lecture. Alicia’s group is also part of a Fondation Leducq Transatlantic Network of Excellence focused on novel pharmacotherapies for sinus node dysfunction.

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Love, Hope, and Neurodiversity

May 10, 2024, 1 p.m.

Race & Resistance is pleased to host a session for our resident scholar, Dr. Chantelle Lewis, to discuss her forthcoming book We See Things They'll Never See: Love, Hope and Neurodiversity (Princeton University Press, 2025), co-authored with Professor Jason Arday. Dr. Lewis will speak about her journey in the field of Sociology, the inspiration for the book, as well as her hopes for the future of the field. The session will end with a Q&A, so come prepared with your questions. Biography: Dr. Chantelle Lewis (she/her) is the Andrew Pitt Junior Research Fellow in Black British Studies at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. She is a public sociologist, and Black feminist intellectual whose research is situated at the intersections of race and class; gender studies, social theory, queer theory, politics and family studies. In the broadest sense, Dr. Lewis' intellectual project is interdisciplinary, but primarily focused on collaborative scholarship and dialogical knowledge production; as well as the democratisation of generative modes of understanding and navigating education. As a neurodivergent scholar, Dr. Lewis is passionate about inclusive education and creative scholarship produced beyond the written word. She is co-founder, co-host and executive producer of the Radio Academy award nominated podcast Surviving Society Productions, leading the curation and production of more than 300 episodes; featuring leading academics, activists and community organisers from across the world. With a listenership concentrated across Europe, Africa and North America primarily, Surviving Society has become a staple of social sciences and humanities reading lists both in UKHE and internationally. —-------------------- Twitter: race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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Title TBC

May 10, 2024, 1 p.m.

Title TBC

May 10, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

The determining role of cell adhesions for force transmission, mechanical activity and stiffness sensing in cells and tissues

May 10, 2024, 2 p.m.

The role of tissue stiffness in controlling cell behaviours ranging from proliferation to signalling and activation is by now well accepted. A key focus of experimental studies into mechanotransduction are focal adhesions, localised patches of strong adhesion, where cell signalling has been established to occur. However, these adhesion sites themselves alter the mechanical equilibrium of the system determining the force balance and work done. To explore this I have developed an active matter continuum description of cellular contractility and will discuss recent results on the specific role of spatial positioning of adhesions in mechanotransduction. I show using energy arguments why the experimentally observed arrangements of focal adhesions develop and the implications this has for stiffness sensing and cellular contractility control. I will also show how adhesions play distinct roles in single cells and tissue layers respectively drawing on recent experimental work with Dr JR Davis (Manchester University) and Dr Nic Tapon (Crick Institute) with applications to epithelial layers and organoids.

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Title TBC

May 10, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

Theorising LGBTQ Family Relationships Through Intersectionality and Life Stories

May 10, 2024, 3:45 p.m.

Biography Susanne Yuk Ping Choi is Professor at the Department of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Gender Research Centre at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include migration, gender, family, and sexuality in Chinese societies. She received her DPhil in Sociology from Nuffield College, University of Oxford. Her lead-authored book monograph Masculine Compromise: Migration, Family and Gender in China was published by the University of California Press. The book received the Best Book Award of the International Sociological Association’s Sociology of Migration Section (RC31). She received the Chinese University’s Young Researcher’s Award (2012), Exemplary Teaching Award (2016), Vice-Chancellor’s Exemplary Teaching Award (2016), Research Excellence Award (2017), and Research Mentorship Award (2018). She served as an appointed member of Hong Kong’s Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC) between 2015 and 2021, during which she was elected convener of EOC’s Policy, Research and Training Division, and convener of its Anti-Sexual Harassment Working Group.

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Making of the “Feebleminded”: Gender and Family for the Medical Discourse Around Eugenic Sterilization in 1950s Japan

May 10, 2024, 5 p.m.

This lecture examines the medical discourse of the ‘feebleminded’, which emerged in 1950s Japan in the process of implementing involuntary sterilization under the Eugenic Protection Law (1948-96). It shows how the medical discourse was gendered and caricatured their sexuality as a threat to social order. It then argues that the making of the medical knowledge about the ‘feebleminded’, though appearing as scientific, was a social act, by describing how the patient’s families were involved in the making of the knowledge. Aya is Reader in Japanese Studies at the University of Manchester. She has long worked on the history of reproduction and population in modern Japan and most recently published Science for Governing Japan’s Population from Cambridge University Press (2023). Currently, Aya is writing a book manuscript tentatively entitled Negotiating for Asia’s Population: Japan in the Transnational Network of Family Planning, Development Aids and Global Health.

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The Dacre Lecture 2024 | Dmitri Levitin - The Origins of Modern Eurocentrism: Erudition, Theology, Philosophy, and Race, 1700-1800

May 10, 2024, 5 p.m.

THE DACRE LECTURE 2024 DMITRI LEVITIN THE ORIGINS OF MODERN EUROCENTRISM ERUDITION, THEOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, AND RACE, 1700–1800 FRIDAYFRIDAY 10 MAY 2024, 5PM AL JABER AUDITORIUM CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE, OXFORD ABSTRACT In 1800, German writers started offering genealogies of modernity running from classical Athens (especially its philosophers), through early Christianity (considered a Greek rather than a Jewish phenomenon, at least in spirit), to modern 'enlightened' Protestantism. A century earlier, this genealogy would have been unthinkable. For in 1700, every European intellectual would have agreed that Greek philosophy was not qualitatively different from its ‘oriental’ counterpart, and that Christianity had emerged directly from Judaism. Combining intellectual and social history, this lecture will provide a new account of how this peculiar Eurocentrism emerged, and why it proved so successful, coming to be deployed in political debates about Jewish emancipation and the abolition of Atlantic slavery. Moreover, it will identify the origins of some long-lasting concepts and ideas: (1) the distinction between ‘Pauline’ and ‘Jewish’ Christianity; (2) the distinction between ‘pre-’ and ‘post- Socratic’ philosophy; (3) a ‘Greek miracle’ in intellectual history; (4) the earliest full conspiracy theory about a Jewish politico-economic plot to take over the world; (5) the first fears of a ‘Great Replacement’ of native Europeans by immigrants. It will suggest that the parallel appearance of these concepts was not unconnected.

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The Dacre Lecture (held in association with the History Faculty) - ‘The origins of modern Eurocentrism: erudition, theology, philosophy, and race, 1700-1800’

May 10, 2024, 5 p.m.

In 1800, German writers started offering genealogies of modernity running from classical Athens (especially its philosophers), through early Christianity (considered a Greek rather than a Jewish phenomenon, at least in spirit), to modern 'enlightened' Protestantism. A century earlier, this genealogy would have been unthinkable. For in 1700, every European intellectual would have agreed that Greek philosophy was not qualitatively different from its ‘oriental’ counterpart, and that Christianity had emerged directly from Judaism. Combining intellectual and social history, this lecture will provide a new account of how this peculiar Eurocentrism emerged, and why it proved so successful, coming to be deployed in political debates about Jewish emancipation and the abolition of Atlantic slavery. Moreover, it will identify the origins of some long-lasting concepts and ideas: (1) the distinction between ‘Pauline’ and ‘Jewish’ Christianity; (2) the distinction between ‘pre-’ and ‘post-Socratic’ philosophy; (3) a ‘Greek miracle’ in intellectual history; (4) the earliest full conspiracy theory about a Jewish politico-economic plot to take over the world; (5) the first fears of a ‘Great Replacement’ of native Europeans by immigrants. It will suggest that the parallel appearance of these concepts was not unconnected.

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Rhodes Film Fora | For Tomorrow

May 10, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Join us for a screening of documentary 'For Tomorrow' followed by a post-film discussion in conversation with Gina Lucarelli - Team Leader Accelerator Lab Network, UNDP and the documentary's Director, An Tran! 'For Tomorrow' follows the journey of grassroots innovators dedicated to fighting some of today's most pressing sustainability issues. Through actions, big and small, everyday change-makers are tackling local problems and inspiring their communities with ingenuity, resilience and vision. From the streets of Baku to a farming community in the Andes and the mountains of Northern India, the documentary follows five innovators on their quest for real, actionable change. Their journey to innovation is never simple-how do you keep going when even your husband doesn't believe in your idea? -but the power of their vision keeps them going. Is the world ready to finally listen to them and change the way it handles and solves global problems?

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Telling Stories

May 10, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Chris Chibnall, a BAFTA and Peabody award winning screenwriter, executive producer and playwright, whose work includes Dr Who, Broadchurch, and Kiss Me Like You Mean It, talks about telling stories on stage and screen.

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Mini-course on relational contracts and related topics: Lecture 1

May 13, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Visit the website for more details: https://www.ludvigsinander.net/mini-courses.html

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Empowering Oxford Educators: Exploring how digital resources for teaching can be used to help students maximise their academic potential

May 13, 2024, 10 a.m.

A workshop to explore how digital resources at Oxford can be effectively applied to facilitate and enhance student learning. During the workshop we will: - describe the selection of tools within Canvas, both native tools and integrated tools - explore the features of our Digitally Supported Inclusive Teaching Toolkit, and discuss how you might apply them in your teaching engage in discussions prompted by case studies - show you how to utilise helpful templates to quickly develop content and activities in Canvas - help you formulate an action plan for implementation. We will emphasize innovative practices and how to foster seamless integration of in-person teaching with the powerful digital tools supported by the University. Participants will work on preparing and designing their teaching approach for weeks 0 to 8 in any particular term.

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“They do not discipline me without reason”: The relationship between foster child and foster parent and the experience of growing up in Danish private foster care 1900-1922

May 13, 2024, 11 a.m.

Link to join via Microsoft Teams: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZjhiMWEzOWYtNzQ1Yi00NTUwLTkwOTQtYWZhYjUzNjQyZjI2%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22cc95de1b-97f5-4f93-b4ba-fe68b852cf91%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%228a90033c-fe26-41a7-b094-f077e6448461%22%7d

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"Little Friend of All the World": Kipling’s Kim and International Adoption in Victorian British Culture

May 13, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

How reliable were human raters when assessing second language English prosody? A Bayesian meta-analysis.

May 13, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Rater reliability has been one of the core considerations in human-mediated language assessment. It is also important for training machine learning algorithms in automated language assessment, since human ratings are the key label used to be predicted by automatically extracted linguistic features. Reliable human ratings are a prerequisite for ML models’ prediction accuracy. This study attempts to meta-analyse inter-rater reliability coefficients in human-mediated assessment, using second language English prosody (i.e., stress, intonation, and rhythm) as an example. Prosodic features have been found to be significantly correlated with comprehensibility and communicative success in second language English speech. However, the existing prosody assessment showed great variations in terms of construct operationalisation, rater background, and rating scales used to assess prosody. This meta-analysis aims to understand how these variations might influence rater reliability. A Bayesian meta-analysis was adopted in this study because it can incorporate prior knowledge, ascertain the true null effect, directly model uncertainty, and intuitively compare model fit. A total of 441 reliability estimates were extracted from the screened articles (n = 107), and this paper focuses on the inter-rater reliability as assessed by Cronbach’s alpha (k = 127). The overall inter-rater reliability was 0.92, with 95% credible interval ranging from 0.87 to 0.96. The between-study heterogeneity (τ = 0.65) suggests great variations among studies. Inter-rater reliability was higher when prosody was assessed at the global level as compared with at the specific level. It was also higher when the rating scales were accompanied with specific descriptors than with labels at either endpoint. This meta-analysis calls for further improvement in prosody assessment by clarifying the construct and refining rating scales and has implications for automated prosody assessment. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86206272874?pwd=QzZSZCtCWnNIeUh0cHAvZzNXWWYwZz09

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Ethnic Earnings Inequality in Football

May 13, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Seminar 4 of Trinity Term's Sociology Seminar Series Please join either in person or online. For in-person attendees, the talk will be preceded by a light lunch at 12.15pm. Please email comms@sociology.ox.ac.uk with any questions or to receive the Microsoft Teams link. This paper examines ethnic earnings inequality in European football, a field largely unexplored in sociological studies despite the sport's global significance. Utilising five years of data from top leagues, it investigates whether meritocratic stratification exists amid intense competition, immigration, and ethnic diversity, using detailed player metrics. This paper examines ethnic earnings inequality in the top of European football. While sociological studies have previously focused on racial-ethnic gaps in compensation among professional athletes (i.e. US-based sports such as basketball and baseball), none have asked this question within the context of the largest and most lucrative sport globally. The professional football market is characterised by extreme levels of national and international competition, strong selection on (unique) skills, immigration, and ethnic diversity. It begs the question of whether these circumstances foster meritocratic stratification, as opposed to other segments of the European labour market. The study makes use of five years of player and club data from the top male football leagues of England, Spain, Italy, and Germany, totaling 11,000 player-year observations (2018-2023). Crucially, detailed variables on skillsets, performance, fitness, context-specific experience, firm tenure, and ‘job tasks’ (i.e., positions or roles), which have been computationally derived from agencies and associations, allow for precise measurement of players’ human capital. The precise measurement of the primary stratifier of earnings helps in isolating taste-based discrimination (i.e., prejudice) from statistical discrimination. Additional analyses explore whether earnings gaps associated with ethnicity are correlated with various organisational structures, such as firm, club, institutional and league characteristics.

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Add to my calendar The effects of BCG on non-specific resistance to respiratory infection

May 13, 2024, 1 p.m.

Carotid body: beyond oxygen sensing and ventilation

May 13, 2024, 1 p.m.

The seminar will advocate that sensitization of visceral afferents triggers malfunctional plasticity in downstream neural circuits causing autonomic dysfunction compounding cardiovascular and respiratory disease. The afferent system considered is the peripheral arterial chemoreceptor. The fundamental mechanisms determining its set-point sensitivity will be demonstrated via a novel “accelerator-brake” hypothesis involving glutamate-NMDA receptor signaling. Proof of concept studies in animals and humans that identified the carotid bodies as a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular-respiratory diseases will be reviewed. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of carotid body dysfunction led to the identification of a potent therapeutic – Gefapixant (Lyfnua), a selective purinergic P2X3 receptor antagonist that has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of chronic cough allowing opportunities for repurposing for cardiorespiratory diseases. Interestingly, this antagonist: (i) arrests the pathological hyperexcitability but preserves the physiological signaling of the carotid body; (ii) targets only the chemoreflex-sympathetic reflex pathway, which led to a new hypothesis that carotid body afferents driving different reflex motor outputs are phenotypically distinct based on neurochemical content. The multi-modal property of the carotid body is exemplified by its detection of oxygen, carbon dioxide, low pH but we have extended this to the discovery of sensitivity to metabolic agents such as glucose and glucagon-like-1 peptide. This has led to the notion that the carotid body offers a potential nodal point for intervention in cardiovascular-respiratory diseases where diabetes is a co-morbidity. Translational studies will be presented to demonstrate our recent studies supporting ways by which modulation of carotid body can offer novel therapeutic advances for hypertension, heart failure and licit and illicit opioid induced respiratory depression. References Lataro R, Moraes, DM, Salgado H, Paton JFR (2023). P2X3 receptor antagonism attenuates the progression of heart failure. Nature Communications, 14, 1725. Pauza AG, Thakkar P, Tasic T, Felippe I, Bishop P, Greenwood MP, Ast J, Broichhagen J, Hodson DJ, Salgado HC, Pauza DH, Japundzic-Zigon N, Murphy D & Paton JFR. (2022). GLP1R attenuates sympathetic response to glucose via carotid body inhibition. Circulation Research 130, 694-707. Pijacka, W., Moraes, D.J.A., Ratcliffe, L.E.K., Nightingale, A.K., Hart, E.C., da Silva, M.P., Machado, B.H., McBryde, F.D., Abdala, A.P., Ford, A.P. & Paton, J.F.R. (2016). Purinergic receptors in the carotid body as a novel target for controlling hypertension. Nature Medicine 22, 1151-1159. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Julian is an integrative physiologist translating novel findings from animal models to humans. He was educated at the University of Birmingham (BSc (Hons) 1984) and University of London (PhD, 1987). Subsequently, between 1989-1994, he was a fellow at EI DuPont, Wilmington and University Washington, Seattle, US, and an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow (University of Göttingen, Germany). In 1994, he was awarded a British Heart Foundation Fellowship at the University of Bristol, UK. In 2017, he transferred to the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where he is Director of Manaaki Manawa (established 2019) – the Centre of Heart Research, and Co-Director of Pūtahi Manawa – Healthy Hearts of Aotearoa New Zealand (established 2021), which is the first national Centre of Research Excellence addressing equity in heart health through community-led research. His research focuses on the neural coupling between the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. His novel fundamental discoveries have resulted in first-in-human trials for treating neurogenic hypertension, sleep apnoea and heart failure. He is founder member and Chief Scientific Officer for Ceryx Medical Ltd. designing a novel bionic pacemaker for heart failure. He has 440 publications, ~24,500 citations and an h-index of 84. He was made Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 2021.

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A Theory of Labor Markets with Inefficient Turnover

May 13, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

We develop a theory of labor markets with four features: search frictions, worker productivity shocks, wage rigidity, and two-sided lack of commitment. Inefficient job separations occur in the form of endogenous quits and layoffs that are unilaterally initiated whenever a worker’s wage-to-productivity ratio moves outside an inaction region. We derive sufficient statistics for the labor market response to aggregate shocks based on the distribution of workers’ wage-to-productivity ratios. These statistics crucially depend on the incidence of inefficient job separations, which we show how to identify using readily available microdata on wage changes and worker flows between jobs.

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iSkills for Medical Sciences and OUH Trust: top tips for designing a conference poster

May 13, 2024, 2 p.m.

Are you planning to present a poster at an upcoming conference, meeting or symposium? This introductory session will provide you with some top tips on how to create a poster presentation which will help you to communicate your research project and data effectively. There will be guidance on formatting, layout, content, use of text, references and images, as well as advice on printing and presenting your poster. This session will also provide help with locating resources such as templates, free-to-use images and poster guidelines. By the end of this online session you will be able to: evaluate the effectiveness of templates, formatting, text and images; and plan, prepare and present your poster. Intended audience: students, staff and researchers from MSD and OUH.

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Austerity, Experimentation and Opposition: The Global and Local Politics of Biomedical Contraception in Uganda

May 13, 2024, 4 p.m.

In 1957, American physician, eugenicist and heir to Proctor and Gamble, Clarence Gamble teamed up with medics and women activists in Uganda to found the Family Planning Association of Uganda. In this article, I examine how a global idea; that modern contraception could prevent what was perceived to be one of the greatest threats to humanity – global overpopulation – was re-imagined and contested in the former British colony of Uganda, which only few decades earlier had suffered a devastating population decline. I show how various actors – medical workers, women’s rights activists, politicians, and self-styled representatives of the ‘common man’ responded to and confronted global narratives about overpopulation. *Dr Kembabazi* is assistant professor of African History at the University of Warwick, UK. She holds a PhD from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. A native of East Africa, Dr Kembabazi has an extensive teaching career that began in 2006 in East Africa and continued to be nurtured in the USA and Europe where she has taught African and European history. Her research addresses the themes of political culture, nationalism, state violence, ethnicity, civil society, slavery, gender and sexuality, medicine and public health, urbanization, and cosmopolitanism.

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Title TBC

May 13, 2024, 4:05 p.m.

The transformation of the Ottoman-Iranian boundaries at the “Idea of Iran” symposium

May 13, 2024, 5 p.m.

Public Seminar Series: Generative AI and Education: Challenges and Opportunities

May 13, 2024, 5 p.m.

Generative AI systems such as ChatGPT are disrupting education. They can write essays, summarise scientific texts, produce lesson plans, and tutor students. In this seminar I will discuss challenges that generative AI can pose for higher education. These include detecting student assignments that have been generated by AI; developing policy decisions and guidelines on appropriate use of AI for teaching and assessment; and establishing a program of AI literacy for staff and students. I will also explore opportunities for the use of AI in education, including roles for AI in teaching, learning and assessment such as Possibility Engine, Socratic Opponent, Co-Designer and Dynamic Assessor. Future developments in social generative AI could support team learning and communities of practice. Rather than seeing AI solely as a challenge to traditional education, we should prepare students for a future where AI is an integral tool for analysis, design and creativity, to be operated with great care and awareness of its limitations. In-person booking link: https://forms.office.com/e/vy67aGrtm8 Teams booking link: https://events.teams.microsoft.com/event/0a3e4bdb-c911-4c5f-a03d-4f8a3be400d9@cc95de1b-97f5-4f93-b4ba-fe68b852cf91

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Reharmonizing value in a Siberian shamanic ritual: Gabriel Tarde and post-Soviet national revival

May 13, 2024, 5 p.m.

Zeinab Badawi in conversation with Dean Ngaire Woods

May 13, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Award-winning broadcaster, journalist, and filmmaker, Zeinab Badawi returns to Oxford to talk to Dean Ngaire Woods about her book An African History of Africa: From the Dawn of Humanity to Independence published in April this year. The book guides us through Africa’s spectacular history – from the very origins of our species, through ancient civilisations and medieval empires with remarkable queens and kings, to the miseries of conquest and the elation of independence. Visiting more than thirty African countries to interview countless historians, anthropologists, archaeologists and local storytellers, Zeinab Badawi unearths buried histories from across the continent and gives Africa its rightful place in our global story. The result is a gripping new account of Africa: an epic, sweeping history of the oldest inhabited continent on the planet, told through the voices of Africans themselves. Copies of Ms Badawi’s book will be available for purchase. Zeinab Badawi is President of SOAS University of London and an honorary fellow of her alma mater St Hilda’s College, Oxford. Born in Sudan, she has worked in the British media for several decades. Zeinab is a recipient of the President’s Medal of the British Academy, a Patron of the United Nations Association UK, and is on the boards of the Arts, Humanities and Research Council, MINDS (the Mandela Institute for Development Studies), the International Crisis Group and Afrobarometer. She was previously Chair of the Royal African Society. An African History of Africa is her first book.

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WIMM Student Presentation Day 2024

May 14, 2024, 9 a.m.

This event represents an excellent opportunity for WIMM students to practice presentation skills and communicate their research to their peers and other academic staff of the WIMM.

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Scientific Writing: Getting Your Paper Published (in-person)

May 14, 2024, 9 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS You will learn how to choose the best journal for your work, negotiate the peer review process and deal with reviewer comments. The course will cover:  Why publish and how that affects how you publish.  The structure of a paper.  What to include in the title and abstract.  Open access.  Impact metrics and citations.  Ways to get published more quickly.  Publicising your paper once it is published. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the session participants will be able to:  Develop and understanding of the peer review process.  Construct an effective title and abstract.  Be equipped to choose journals for future papers.  Be equipped to publicise future papers. PREVIOUS PARTICIPANTS HAVE SAID "Nice to have a professional with an in-depth industry knowledge offer training and advice.'" "The course was excellent and very well delivered. there was a real sense of professionalism.'" "Now it doesn't feel so scary to try to publish a paper.'" INTENDED FOR DPhil students and research staff. The course is suitable for DPhil students and postdocs who want to understand the publishing process better, whether or not they have already submitted a paper.

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Mini-course on relational contracts and related topics: Lecture 2

May 14, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Visit the website for more details: https://www.ludvigsinander.net/mini-courses.html

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Periodizing Global History: What is Early Modernity? What is Modernity?

May 14, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

The language of ‘Early Modernity’ has become de rigueur across the humanities. But how far has it simply become a convenient way of referring to the period circa 1450-1750 CE, with the teleological meaning of the words quietly set aside? If many historians of the West are likely to be uncomfortable with the implied grand narrative, the irony is that the past two decades or so have seen global historians and specialists of Asian history take the label and run with it. Reclaiming a sense of forward progression for societies from the Ottomans to the Mughals and Japan, they have sought to give analytical content to the language of early modernity. However, this brings in its train some fraught questions, not least how we define modernity itself. This informal workshop seeks to establish where different areas of the historical profession sit in relation to the question of large-scale periodisation and to start exploring some of its theoretical implications. Is it inherently Eurocentric to use this language or rather to deny its relevance for the world outside Europe? Does the notion of multiple modernities clarify or muddy the waters? Can we periodise through a ‘connective history’ evocation of early globalization or should we identify specific comparative features of nascent modernity? Do historians of the modern period believe in modernity? One significant theme will be the sphere of religion and its relationship to the state across Eurasia. Many of the participants will give short talks, but the point is to generate an exploratory conversation rather than act as an occasion for the delivery of research outcomes. All welcome. Please email the organizer, Alan Strathern "$":mailto:alan.strathern@history.ox.ac.uk, if you intend to come so that we can gain a sense of numbers.

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Title TBC

May 14, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

SSRIs: A Pharmacological Cul-de-Sac?

May 14, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Abstract TBA https://zoom.us/j/95199401096?pwd=ancrZ0U1b0RNVmlKL0tQdTQ5SzhLUT09 Meeting ID: 951 9940 1096 Passcode: 937384

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Innovation Leadership Programme (ILP) - core programme (in-person & online)

May 14, 2024, 10 a.m.

The 5-module core course designed and delivered by a team from Henley Business School provides a blend of online materials, presentations and small group discussion sessions, and aims to develop enhanced skills and confidence in innovation leadership, managing stakeholders and teams, influencing skills and more. Module 1: Leadership and innovation Module 2: The Entrepreneurial Mindset Module 3: Visualising Success: setting goals and identifying success factors Module 4: Managing stakeholders and teams; Coaching and mentoring for success Module 5: Communicating and influencing externally

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Open scholarship: fundamentals of open access

May 14, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Are you baffled by open, confused by embargoes? Does the mention of the colour gold or green catapult you into a realm of perplexed irritation? Come to this session, where we’ll break down open access and all its many jargon terms, confusing publishing structures and hint at the advantages you can reap by publishing open. We’ll cover: what is open access? key terms – Gold, Green, Article Processing Charges; where to get more information and help; where to look for open access material; and useful tools to assist you in publishing open access. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Brunel First Annual Health Economics and Policy Forum: 'Optimizing Resource Relief and Addressing Critical Health Needs through the Transition to Reduced- risk Products'

May 14, 2024, 11 a.m.

Welcome to the Brunel First Annual Health Economics and Policy Forum! The healthcare sector invests significant resources in addressing the consequences of dominant high-risk behaviors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of exercise, poor dietary habits, and digital addiction, all of which impact individual physical and mental well-being. However, envisioning a scenario where individuals adopt healthier lifestyles could lead to a transformative change that enhances individual well-being while reducing healthcare costs. Join us for the First Brunel Annual Health Economic and Policy Forum, where leading experts and policymakers will convene to explore innovative strategies for optimizing resource allocation and addressing critical health needs in the transition to reduced-risk products. This forum will provide a unique opportunity to engage in thought-provoking discussions, gain insights from esteemed speakers, editors and collaborate with peers to drive positive change in healthcare policy. Key Topics Include: • Evaluating the Economic Impact of Reduced-Risk Products • Policy Frameworks for Promoting Public Health and Harm Reduction • Healthcare System Resilience and Adaptation in the Face of Change • Addressing Health Inequalities and Disparities Through Innovative Solutions Here is the registration link for the Annual Health Economic and Policy Forum: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/brunel-first-annual-health-economics-and-policy-forum-tickets872542797997 There is a special issue at Journal of Discover Social Science and Health associated to this workshop. Here is the link to call for this Special Issue Optimizing Resource Relief and Addressing Critical Health Needs through the Transition to Reduced-risk Products | SpringerLink Deadline for full paper submissions is 31st May 2024.

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Sex differences in neural control of urethral smooth muscle

May 14, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'A year of the Thames Valley LINK Programme. Working with children, young people and professionals in complex situations: strategic and practical considerations'

May 14, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

Dr Nick Hindley (Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Oxon Link and Horizon Teams, Oxford Health Lead Named Doctor for Children’s Safeguarding) will be joined by colleagues to present strategic and practical considerations of the Thames Valley LINK Programme. The Programme has been established to provide extra support to children and young people who are often described as having ‘complex needs’. https://www.oxfordhealth.nhs.uk/camhs/bob/tvlp/ This is a hyrbid event, held in the Department of Psychiatry’s Seminar Room and online (Zoom). Please email shona.oleary@psych.ox.ac.uk to request the Zoom link.

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UK EQUATOR Centre: Publication School

May 14, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Online Publication School: 14-17 May 2024, 12:30-17:00 BST The UK EQUATOR Centre’s Publication School is designed for early-career researchers and students. It aims to give you a smooth writing process that results in a published article that is fit for purpose. You will experience four afternoons of learning led by methodological and writing experts from the UK EQUATOR Centre and Centre for Statistics in Medicine. Through group work, discussion, and practical exercises, we cover everything you need to plan, write, and publish your health-related research study. WHAT WE COVER IN PUBLICATION SCHOOL Planning your message and audience Negotiating authorship Choosing a journal and avoiding predators Good writing style and habits What to write where: recipes for a successful introduction, methods, results, and discussion Using reporting guidelines Revising your work for simplicity, clarity and completeness Summarising your article in an effective title and abstract Writing effective cover letters Submission and dealing with peer review Disseminating your article after publication The course will be held live over Zoom. Participants will need to have Zoom downloaded, rather than using the browser version, as we will be using registrations. We will teach using shared slides, webcam, and audio. We’re excited to maintain the highly interactive nature of Publication School in this online format, with all-group discussion and small-group exercises and discussion. Participants will be welcome to use text chat, mic, and/or webcam in the main room, but will need at least a mic for small-group work in breakout rooms Sessions will run 12:30-17:00 BST, with regular comfort breaks. We will not record the sessions, but participants will receive the electronic course workbook with all notes and exercises. We regret that we are unable to offer live captions.

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CSAE Research Workshop Week 4

May 14, 2024, 1 p.m.

The nationalisation of rice. The postwar global crisis and the emergence of India’s national economy

May 14, 2024, 2 p.m.

Jon Wilson is a historian of South Asian and, more recently, global politics based at King’s College London, where he is currently Head of History. He has published The Domination of Strangers. Modern Governance in Eastern India, 1780-1835 (2007) and India Conquered. Britain’s Raj and the Chaos of Empire (2017), and is currently writing a global history of the emergence of the nation state in the twentieth century.

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Title TBC

May 14, 2024, 2 p.m.

iSkills: Research metrics and citation analysis tools: Part 2 article and researcher metrics

May 14, 2024, 3 p.m.

In this session we will examine article and researcher level metrics. We will discuss how citation counting can help identify influential papers in particular fields and how altmetrics provide a different perspective on research output. Using tools such as Web of Science, Google Scholar and Scopus you will learn how to calculate a researcher h-index. The session will also allow you to appreciate the limitations of different metrics and the importance of their cautious interpretation. By the end of the session you will be familiar with: using Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar to track and count citations to papers and individual researchers; measuring impact using altmetrics; calculating your own h-index; creating a researcher profile and using ORCID IDs to identify your work; and issues and recommendations for using citation analysis to measure impact for articles and authors. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Early qualitative and quantitative amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram and raw electroencephalogram for predicting long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in extremely preterm infants in the Netherlands: a 10-year cohort study

May 14, 2024, 3 p.m.

Extremely preterm infants born before 28 weeks gestation are at high risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. Amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) accompanied by raw EEG traces (aEEG-EEG) during the first days after birth could help predict outcomes in these infants. This study aimed to determine if specific qualitative and quantitative aEEG-EEG features predict cognitive, motor, and behavioral outcomes at ages 2-3 and 5-7 years in extremely preterm infants. This retrospective cohort study analyzed aEEG-EEG recordings from the first 3 days after birth for extremely preterm infants born before 28 weeks gestation at Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital, Netherlands between 2008-2018. Infants with genetic/metabolic diseases or major malformations were excluded. Qualitative features were extracted, including background pattern, sleep-wake cycling, and seizures. Quantitative metrics were also extracted, grouped into spectral content, amplitude, connectivity, and discontinuity. Machine learning models evaluated if these early aEEG-EEG features predicted outcomes at follow-up, controlling for potential confounders like illness severity and medications. Key findings showed background pattern was the strongest predictor. Infants with discontinuous background patterns were more likely to have cognitive, motor, and behavioral problems at follow-up. Quantitative features also had predictive value - increased discontinuity and decreased lower-frequency activity predicted worse outcomes. Sleep-wake cycling and seizures occurred too infrequently to assess predictive utility. This study found early aEEG-EEG background patterns and quantitative metrics in extremely preterm infants provided valuable prognostic information about neurodevelopmental impairments at ages 2-7 years. Discontinuous background and increased discontinuity specifically were associated with cognitive, motor, and behavioral problems. These findings highlight the potential for automated, interpretable analysis of early aEEG-EEG features to aid risk stratification, decision-making, and intervention planning for this high-risk population. Future research should explore integrating these predictive EEG biomarkers into an automated prognostic tool to enable individualized predictions and support precision care for extremely preterm infants.

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Peer Effects and the Gender Gap in Corporate Leadership: Evidence from MBA Students

May 14, 2024, 4 p.m.

Women continue to be underrepresented in corporate leadership positions. This paper studies the role of social connections in women's career advancement. We investigate whether access to a larger share of female peers in business school affects the gender gap in senior managerial positions. Merging administrative data from a top-10 US business school with public LinkedIn profiles, we first document that female MBAs are 24 percent less likely than male MBAs to enter senior management within 15 years of graduation. Next, we use the exogenous assignment of students into sections to show that a larger proportion of female MBA section peers increases the likelihood of entering senior management for women but not for men. This effect is driven by female-friendly firms, such as those with more generous maternity leave policies and greater work schedule flexibility. A larger proportion of female MBA peers induces women to transition to these firms where they attain senior management roles. We find suggestive evidence that some of the mechanisms behind these results include job referrals and gender-specific information transmission. These findings highlight the role of social connections in reducing the gender gap in senior management positions.

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Tackling big questions in tuberculosis: a TB biologist’s view from South Africa

May 14, 2024, 4 p.m.

Royal letter-writing in the 16th century: the edition of the letters-missive of Francis I

May 14, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Imperial Bonding: The Growth, Demise, and Reformulation of Financial Networks in the Interwar Atlantic

May 14, 2024, 5 p.m.

Settler Colonialism in India: Temsula Ao’s Writings and the Politics of Intervention in the 'Northeast'

May 14, 2024, 5 p.m.

Addressing a range of contemporary and historical conflicts and daily struggles, this series of talks will explore how violence remains integral to the global political economy, with lasting effects on gendered hierarchies which often extend far beyond immediate war zones.

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Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2024 - Lecture 3 - “Witches” and the Humanitarian World: NGOs, Churches, and the State

May 14, 2024, 5 p.m.

Lecture 3 of the Evans-Pritchard Lecture series “Witches” and the Humanitarian World: NGOs, Churches, and the State. All are welcome to attend in person or via the Teams ID and password below: Meeting ID: 318 331 790 674 Passcode: LEecHc

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Oxford Energy Seminar Series – Week 4 TT24: Substitution of the Suez Canal and Bab El Mandeb Strait with the new Mesopotamian Canal. Bypassing the Strait of Hormuz

May 14, 2024, 5 p.m.

Since 1869, reliance on maritime global trade, spanning from the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean via the Suez Canal, Bab el Mandeb, and the Strait of Hormuz, has faced persistent challenges due to geopolitical tensions. The blockade of the Suez Canal from March 23 to 29, 2021, resulted in staggering losses of up to $400 million per hour or $9.6 billion per day, starkly emphasizing the critical need for alternative maritime routes. Waterways Engineers Ltd. proposes two transformative projects to address these issues: the Mesopotamian Canal, providing a direct link from the Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf, reducing the route by 3000 km, and alternative channels in the Musandam Peninsula and the UAE, aiming to bypass the Strait of Hormuz, shortening maritime routes by up to 200 km and ensuring safe navigation. These initiatives signify a paradigm shift in global maritime trade, offering solutions to longstanding challenges and reshaping trade dynamics. Waterways Engineers Ltd. is dedicated to spearheading these transformative efforts, ushering in a new era of maritime connectivity and economic prosperity.

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Happy Pills and Horoscopes: Collecting and Using Early Modern Almanacs 1600-1800

May 14, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

(Organised jointly with the Early Modern English Literature seminar)

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Happy Pills and Horoscopes: Collecting and Using Early Modern Almanacs 1600-1800

May 14, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

All welcome Refreshments

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Mini-course on relational contracts and related topics: Lecture 3

May 15, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Visit the website for more details: https://www.ludvigsinander.net/mini-courses.html

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Time Management (online)

May 15, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this session you will understand more about:  A range of time saving techniques.  Time wasting activities and learn how to deal with them.  The difference between important and urgent.  The importance of planning and setting time aside.

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iSkills: Managing Research Data and Data Management Planning (DMPs)

May 15, 2024, 10 a.m.

Good research data management is a vital component of academic practice. Part of this is the principle that the data used to develop the arguments and outcomes of your research should be effectively stored and managed during a project, preserved for the future and - where possible - shared with other academics. This session introduces the University’s research data policy and outlines the practical impact this will have on your work. The services available at Oxford to assist you will be outlined. This session is not only essential during your current studies but will be invaluable if you plan to continue in research as a career. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Open scholarship: preregistration and registered reports: what, why, and how

May 15, 2024, 10 a.m.

How do you ensure that your research is credible, to yourself and others? Preregistration means specifying in advance your hypotheses, methods, and/or analyses for a study, in a time-stamped file that others can access. Many fields, including behavioural and medical sciences, are increasingly using preregistration or Registered Reports (where a journal accepts your study at preregistration phase, and guarantees to publish the results if you follow the registered plan). If you've never preregistered a study before (or even if you have!) it can be complicated and hard to do well. In this workshop, we will go over the 'what,' 'why,' and 'how' of preregistration, and after some practice exercises, you will start drafting your own preregistration. We will also discuss some of the common challenges of preregistration, and its limitations. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Title TBC

May 15, 2024, 11 a.m.

Demand for Urban Exploration: Evidence from Nairobi

May 15, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Growing cities in low- and middle-income countries offer increased market access, yet this requires that residents explore their surroundings. This is not always the case. In a sample of 800 casual workers in Nairobi, the median person commutes 7.8 km but has never been to 1 in 5 of neighbourhoods within that distance. We offer short-term employment to these workers and experimentally induce familiarity by training participants in either familiar or unfamiliar locations. We measure willingness to work in different locations across the city. Participants need to be paid more to work in a neighbourhood that is unfamiliar at baseline. The premium is equivalent to 3.5 km of distance or to 113 Ksh (23% of the median daily wage), and this is fully offset after one visit. Participant beliefs about labour market opportunities and safety in unfamiliar neighbourhoods are initially worse on average, but converge after one visit. We consider two additional potential barriers to exploration: forecasting errors and the attentional salience of familiar neighbourhoods. Written with Joshua T. Dean, Gabriel Kreindler, Oluchi Mbonu

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Research Data Management (in-person)

May 15, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

COURSE DETAILS In this session we introduce RDM and the practical skill of developing Data Management Plans to manage your own data successfully. The Research Data Management (RDM) course answers these questions and more:  How often do you consider how you’re managing this vital resource?  Is your data secure and backed up?  How can you demonstrate its integrity if challenged?  Could your research make a greater impact by sharing data?  What happens to your hard-won data when your project ends? LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this session you will:  Have an appreciation of the importance of RDM and understand the research data management lifecycle.  Confidently approach preparing a data management plan and apply the principles to your own research.  Be able to locate sources of support and expertise around the University to help with different aspects of RDM.

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T Cell Responses to Flaviviruses - Immunopathogenesis and Vaccines

May 15, 2024, 1 p.m.

Speaker bio: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/infection-veterinary-and-ecological-sciences/staff/lance-turtle/ This is a hybrid seminar. To join via Zoom, please register in advance: https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMvd-6prDwtHt24jNykK82_RHIZlDjwPBYO After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

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Who will rule? The significance of South Africa’s upcoming election

May 15, 2024, 1 p.m.

Adriaan Basson is editor-in-chief of News24 and the author of four books on corruption and current affairs. He is the recipient of multiple awards for investigative journalism, including the CNN African Journalist of the Year for news and the Taco Kuiper award. Basson worked as an investigative journalist on the Mail & Guardian, where he was a founding member of amaBhungane, before moving to City Press as assistant editor. In 2013, he became editor of Beeld and in 2016 was appointed editor-in-chief of News24.

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Session 4: What does interdisciplinarity look like in Agile Sprints? (online webinar)

May 15, 2024, 1 p.m.

Discover how interdisciplinarity is conceptualised in the Agile Initiative and how to manage it effectively in an Agile Sprint. This is workshop is open to: Oxford University researchers planning to develop an Agile Sprint; Oxford University researchers working on other interdisciplinary research projects who wish to gain insights on rapid applied interdisciplinary research; previous Agile researchers wishing to review their experience of interdisciplinary research during their work on an Agile Sprint, to best describe it for future career opportunities. You will gain insight on how to address the challenge of planning for and managing a rapid model of interdisciplinary research. By the end of this workshop, you will have gained knowledge of: What drives interdisciplinary research in Agile Sprints How to integrate diversity in terms of discipline, research design and research team membership relative to the Sprint’s research question, policy focus and communities affected by the policy issue How to ensure integration of disciplines from the outset by creating a shared understanding of the problem definition, a common language, and interdisciplinary culture within a Sprint team How to manage interdisciplinarity as an ongoing practice to avoid siloed work packages and overreliance on one discipline for integrated final outputs. “Interdisciplinary research can be rewarding, exciting and challenging in equal (and sometimes unequal!) measure. This session aims to facilitate a discussion about what makes interdisciplinary research plain sailing and how to avoid capsize when things get difficult.” -Dr Mark Hirons Book your place on the workshop using the links provided. If you need to cancel your place, please do so no later than 48 hours before the workshop. By booking on this workshop, you have agreed to the externally facing use of the recording. Book another session, by viewing the series event page. Participation: Please note you will be expected to actively participate, which includes joining discussion, listening, asking questions, and contributing to activities.

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Title TBC

May 15, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

Mental Health and the Thriving Research Group: A discussion by Outstanding Supervisor Award Winners & Group Members.

May 15, 2024, 2 p.m.

Chaired by Prof Matt Jarvis, panellists will discuss how mental health is facilitated in their research groups before inviting audience participation about what works and what doesn’t work, suggesting approaches and inviting questions from audience members. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this session you will: • Understand more about the link between good mental health and creating a thriving research group. • Have learnt about different approaches to managing and leading research groups. • Understand more about research groups and how they work from different perspectives.

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Oxford Technology & Security Nexus — Political and Environmental Impact of AI Supply Chains

May 15, 2024, 3 p.m.

This week, Dr. Ana Valdivia from the Oxford Internet Institute will be speaking on the political and environmental impact of AI and its supply chains. About the speaker Ana Valdivia is a Departmental Research Lecturer in Artificial Intelligence (AI), Government & Policy at the Oxford Internet Institute (OII). Ana investigates how datafication and algorithmic systems are transforming political, social and ecological worlds. Building on her experience as a mathematician and computer scientist, her interest lies in investigating how AI is impacting on local communities, borders and territories. In her current research, Ana aims to examine the political and environmental impact of AI by understanding its life cycle from mineral extractivism, data centres and electronic waste dumps. She is also interested in analysing algorithmic resistance and oppression from feminist lens. Her previous research has analysed the impact of datafication technologies from a critical perspective in different contexts such as migration or criminal justice. She has analysed the colonial and racial legacy of biometrics, which has been featured in relevant conferences like ACM Fairness, Accountability and Fairness in Machine Learning. As a postdoctoral researcher at King’s College London, she developed digital methodologies to unveil which algorithmic systems are used in the field of border security, such as biometric databases or maritime surveillance algorithms. Moreover, Ana led a collaboration with magistrates in Spain to understand the impact of gender-based violence risk assessment tools implemented in courts, which was featured by the Montreal AI Ethics Institute. Her transdisciplinary research agenda stems from the ability to combine quantitative and qualitative methodologies bridging the gap between computer and social science; and collaborate with scholars from a range of different disciplines, including political science, philosophy and law. Ana also serves as a co-editor of Big Data & Society journal. In 2023, her academic contribution to AI was awarded by the British Academy. In 2022, Ana was awarded with the Post-Doctoral Enrichment Award by The Alan Turing Institute. She is a former fellow of Data Science for Social Good program at University of Chicago (USA). Ana has recently been invited as a keynote speaker by Tecnológico de Monterrey (México). She is actively collaborating with international grassroot organisations such as AlgoRace or Tierra Común to raise awareness on how algorithmic harms impacts on racialised subjects. Ana also collaborates with Post Apocalipsis Nau podcast where she brings her critical perspective towards digital technologies to the general public. She also writes in the Jevon’s Paradox blog, where she examines power unbalances between science, technology and knowledge. Her work has been widely featured in international media outlets (Público, El País, El Salto, elDiario.es).

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Advancing AI-ECG Diagnosis Using Deep Learning and Neural Architecture Search

May 15, 2024, 5 p.m.

Abstract: Electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely considered the primary test for evaluating cardiovascular diseases. However, the use of AI models to advance these medical practices and learn new clinical insights from ECGs remains largely unexplored. Utilising a data set of 2.3 million ECGs collected from patients with 7 years follow-up, we developed a DNN model with state-of-the-art granularity for the interpretable diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities, gender identification, and hypertension screening solely from ECGs, which are then used to stratify the risk of mortality. Our model demonstrated cardiologist-level accuracy in interpretable cardiac diagnosis, and the potential to facilitate clinical knowledge discovery for gender and hypertension detection which are not readily available. In addition, we explored the design of optimal DNN models through of a novel Neural Architecture Search (NAS) approach, which was able to find networks outperformed the state-of-the-art models with fewer than 5% parameters. Bio: Dr. Lei Lu is a Lecturer in Health Data Science and AI at King’s College London, and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford. Lei obtained his PhD from the Harbin Institute of Technology in China, complemented by two-year visiting research at the University of British Columbia in Canada. Upon completing his PhD study, Lei had his postdoctoral research at the University of Melbourne in Australia. Subsequently, he joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at University of Oxford as a Senior Research Associate. Lei’s work focuses on clinical machine learning to advance healthcare outcomes. Lei is actively engaged in a range of academic roles, including invited speaker at the IET Annual Healthcare Lecture and the IEEE-EMBS Symposium on MDBS. He also served as conference session chair, workshop committee, and guest editor for IJCAI, CIKM, ICRA, and IEEE JBHI. He received the IET J.A. Lodge Award in 2021, which is presented annually to one early-career researcher with distinction.

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Manners and political stability in a commercial republic: the case of France, c. 1795-1799

May 15, 2024, 5 p.m.

Public Talk: Immigration Politics in an Age of Uncertainty

May 15, 2024, 5 p.m.

This roundtable discussion will explore how the politics of immigration has affected the politics of the Americas and Europe, with experts from these regions providing their expert insight into the similarities and differences between nations dealing with unprecedented migration. Among the topics discussed will be the 2024 elections in many countries around the world, including the United Kingdom and the United States, how immigration politics has changed over time, and possible ways to forge consensus on this polarising issue. This event is open to the public.

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Qaum, Mulk, Sultanat: Citizenship and National Belonging in Pakistan

May 15, 2024, 5 p.m.

Film Screening and Discussion: Missing in Brooks County

May 15, 2024, 5 p.m.

For details see https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/film-screening-and-discussion-missing-in-brooks-county

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Democracy in Early Modern East Asia? Japanese chivalric “solidarity” and Chinese imperial “meritocracy” in contrast and collaboration

May 15, 2024, 5 p.m.

Modern Contemporary Literature Graduate Forum

May 15, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

The Women Behind the Few: The Women's Auxiliary Air Force in British Air Intelligence During the Second World War

May 15, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Prof Simon Coleman | Lecture 3 ‘Religious Real Estate: Properties of the Sacred’

May 15, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Lecture Three ‘Religious Real Estate: Properties of the Sacred’ [Wednesday 15 May, from 5:15 to 6:45 pm, Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel College] A persistent image of pilgrimage sites is that they act as ‘spiritual magnets,’ drawing others to them as a result of extraordinary events or miraculous properties of healing or revelation. This view occludes the significance of the multiple material infrastructures that facilitate access to and through a holy place, providing the bodily presences necessary to reinforce its image as locus of exceptional sacrality. In this lecture, I examine the affordances of resources that range from roads to real estate, and I highlight a category of person often ignored in studies of pilgrimage sites: those people—including but not just clergy—who regard sacred destination as ‘home’. I show how domesticity and the divine may become conjoined through miraculous narratives of acquiring and developing property. My focus on the materialities of both cathedrals and Walsingham as sacred places incorporates kitchens and cartographies, personal biographies as well as a wider biopolitics of religious encompassment. Drawing on anthropological work on hospitality and migration, I develop a model of the pilgrimage site as both generator and receiver of ‘vital signs’ of religious presence.

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Communication, Narratives and Antimicrobial Resistance Workshop

May 16, 2024, 9 a.m.

The World Health Organisation has declared Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) as one of the ‘top global and public health development threats.’ This one-day workshop will approach the problem from a Humanities perspective. It will focus on the power of narrative and communication in discussions around antimicrobial resistance. Topics will include: * Narratives of antibiotic resistance in both primary and secondary healthcare, with a focus on clinician-patient encounters. * The communication of antimicrobial resistance through journalism and social media. * The role of scientific publishing in highlighting the challenges of antimicrobial resistance. * The power of art and design in communicating information about antibiotics. The workshop will draw together a wide range of perspectives with participants from the fields of patient activism, journalism, philosophy, microbiology, history, medicine, nursing, policy, and art and design. All welcome, no registration required. Funding: This work is generally sponsored by the John Fell Fund (via the Medical Humanities Programme) and the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford. Convenors: Sally Frampton, Alberto Giubilini, Tess Johnson, Will Matlock.

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Mini-course on relational contracts and related topics: Lecture 4

May 16, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Visit the website for more details: https://www.ludvigsinander.net/mini-courses.html

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Digital Health Horizons Conference

May 16, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Digital Health Horizons: The Future of Health - delves into the dynamic interplay of digital health and medical artificial intelligence, exploring both the promising opportunities, and significant challenges that lie ahead. The conference is designed to foster an environment of knowledge-sharing and inspiration, kicking-off with a morning session of keynote presentations and a panel discussion between experts from academia, policy-making, and industry. The event comprises a morning of keynote presentations, and a panel discussion from leading academic, policy, and industry experts, andh technical poster presentations and lightning talks across two tracks in the afternoon. The inaugural Digital Health Horizons Conference is hosted in partnership with the Cheng Kar Shun Digital Hub at Jesus College, Oxford.

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2-Day Conference - Broadcasting Colonialism: Sight, Sound and Media Technologies in the Colonial World

May 16, 2024, 10 a.m.

The conference invites research on the history of radio, television, film and recorded sound in a colonial context. Scholarship on colonial newspapers is now a well-established field but historians have given less attention to broadcast media due, not least, to the methodological challenges of using audio and visual archives. Colonial officials were fascinated by the power of broadcasting as a tool of political control and its potential to project a high-tech vision of colonial rule as modern and permanent. Paradoxically, this often went hand-in-hand with an ethnographic impetus to record, curate and promote ‘traditional’ music and stories. But broadcast media proved unreliable servants of colonial rule thanks to the efforts of subversive voices from within the colonial media machine and, from without, the cross-border flow of contraband records, banned film reels and ‘guerrilla radio’ stations (Lekgoathi et al, 2020). In some localities broadcast media served as much to undermine as to prolong empire. The scope of the conference is global and invites research on any part of the colonial world defined in the broadest sense, including the European empires, China, Japan and Russia, and settler-colonial societies such as USA. Papers may consider the colonial period itself, the question of legacy in the post-independence era or coverage of the colonial past in contemporary media. Participants are welcome to interpret the subject of the conference as they wish but the following sub-themes may serve as useful starting points: * Archives and methodologies * Modernity, technology and the ‘colonial sublime’ (Larkin, 2015) * The state, political control and ‘soft power’ * Subversive voices, race, gender and liberation * Creators and mediators: broadcasters, producers, directors, actors * Audiences: local, national and trans-national * Music, ethnography and identity * Cultural production, drama and language * Corporate ownership and ‘control patterns’ (Nyamnjoh, 2005) Participants are invited to present papers of 20 minutes, which will be grouped into panels of 3-4 papers and followed by a discussion. The keynote lecture will be held at 17:00 on 16 May. The conference will include a film presentation and discussion session on 17 May. _*Please visit the website to respond to the call for papers: https://www.africanstudies.ox.ac.uk/article/call-for-papers-broadcasting-colonialism-conference, which closes on 2 April 2024.*_

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Telling stories that matter: Communicating your research through story (in-person)

May 16, 2024, 10 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS Discover what elements of storytelling and narrative can be used to enhance a profession in the sciences. Craft compelling and moving stories from your experiences as a scientist using these key story elements: character, conflict, structure, metaphor and description. Apply these storytelling and narrative skills to working in the sciences: communicating research to a range of audiences (including publics, media and funding bodies); enhancing presentation skills; telling scientific stories across a range of media. LEARNING OUTCOMES The aim of the course is:  To increase understanding of the essential elements of a compelling narrative.  To increase understanding of how to draw an audience into a story and keep them involved.  To increase understanding of how to use narrative skills to make an effective ‘pitch’.

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iSkills: Sources for science: Learning the craft of evaluating information and referencing academic sources online

May 16, 2024, noon

All university students need to become skilled in identifying, evaluating and referencing academic sources. These are often essential steps in completing course and tutorial assignments successfully. Unfamiliar sources like peer-reviewed scientific journals and understanding how and why to reference correctly can challenge new undergraduates. In this session we explore the different types of academic sources you may encounter, tools to evaluate a source for academic quality and how to demystify referencing. Intended audience: Oxford undergraduate students from MPLS and MSD.

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Variations in 3D genome structure between homologous chromosomes and in stimulus responses

May 16, 2024, noon

Understanding how 3D genome structure varies between cell types, in development and disease, promises to enhance the interpretation of genome sequence and to accelerate the discovery of disease target genes. To explore 3D genome structure in different stages of development, we applied Genome Architecture Mapping in early mammalian development and in highly specialised cells of the brain). We found extensive cell-type specialisation of 3D chromatin contacts, and discovered large scale decondensation events, or ‘melting’, of long genes when most highly expressed. Through integration of 3D genome structure with single-cell expression and chromatin accessibility, we find cell-type specific hubs of contacts containing genes associated with specialised cellular functions, such as addiction and synaptic plasticity. Our recent work explores differences in 3D genome structure between the two copies of parental chromosomes, and the effects of environmental insults, such as addictive drugs or sleep deprivation on the complex 3D genome structures of brain cells, and their long-term impact in gene deregulation.

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Pathological profiling of alpha-synuclein aggregates in Parkinson's disease: the search for novel biomarkers and treatment avenues

May 16, 2024, 1 p.m.

Insight into Academia: Roles, CVs & Applications

May 16, 2024, 1 p.m.

Are you considering roles in academia? The range of research and teaching roles in higher education is large, and you'll come across a variety of terminology. In this session we will try to de-mystify the options, let you know more about the most commonly found early career academic roles. We'll also look at how to put together a tailored and compelling CV and cover letter or supporting statement for such opportunities and touch on other application materials that you might need. There will be plenty of opportunity to ask questions.

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Medical Grand Rounds - Week 6: Dermatology

May 16, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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An afternoon on AI, Work and Democracy with Keynote from Professor Daron Acemoglu

May 16, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

The Institute for Ethics in AI and the Oxford Martin School are pleased to announce an exclusive afternoon event featuring in-depth panel sessions and a keynote address by distinguished economist Professor Daron Acemoğlu. Agenda 13.15 – 13.30 – Registration 13.30 – 15.00 - Panel Session 1: The value of work John Tasioulas, Director, Institute for Ethics in AI, & Professor of Ethics and Legal Philosophy, Faculty of Philosophy Daniel Susskind, Research Professor in Economics, King's College London & Senior Research Associate, Institute for Ethics in AI Carl Frey, Director, Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Work & Dieter Schwarz Associate Professor of AI & Work, Oxford Internet Institute Ekaterina Hertog, Associate Professor in AI and Society, joint with the Oxford Internet Institute and in association with Wadham College (Chair) 15.00 – 15.30 – Refreshment Break 15.30 – 17.00 - Panel Session 2: Relationship between work and democracy Isabelle Ferreras, FNRS Professor in Sociology, University of Louvain & Visiting Fellow, Institute for Ethics in AI Jeremias Adams-Prassl, Professor of Law, Magdalen College, University of Oxford & Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Law 17.00 – 17.20 – Refreshment Break 17.20 – 18.30 - Keynote: Professor Daron Acemoğlu Title: Redesigning AI Abstract: This talk will argue that the current path of AI is inimical to human flourishing. Nevertheless, different institutional arrangements, ethical underpinnings, and technological vision can lead to better AI. This better AI path will need to overcome the industry's excessive focus on automation, the centralised control of information, challenges in the context of human-AI misalignment, and the disappearing diversity of information among human actors.

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Literature and Mental Health: Reading Group Session 2

May 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

Webpage: english.web.ox.ac.uk/reading-group-literature-and-mental-health Reading list: drive.google.com/drive/folders/1u3IaqwXUPyeOKKQ0oznFdeMODLlTw35g?usp=sharing Please copy and paste the links into a different tab in case they do not open here. Thank you.

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'The Romans and Us', lecture about the Exhibition of Research photos and copies of Roman mosaics (Western and Eastern/Byzantine) which I curated in Wolfson College during Hilary term 2024

May 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

This is a lecture about the Exhibition of Research photos and copies of Roman mosaics (Western and Eastern/Byzantine) which I curated in Wolfson College during Hilary term 2024. It shows material from Venice and Ravenna as well as from Roman villas in the UK

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iSkills: Confidential Print and Foreign Office files: Sources for 19th and 20th century studies

May 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

The British Foreign Office was the government department responsible for the conduct of British relations with nearly all foreign states. Confidential Print and Foreign Office files were intended for circulation internally within the Foreign Office and to the monarch, the Prime Minister, the Cabinet, other government departments and diplomatic missions abroad. These files are now housed in The National Archives, UK, and have been digitised by Adam Matthew Digital on the Archives Direct cross-searchable platform. The Archives Direct platform includes British government papers from the 19th and 20th centuries relating to Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia, Latin America and North America. It’s a crucial resource for the study of politics, international relations, peace and conflict studies, economics and trade, British history and global history. This session will introduce you to The National Archives and their Foreign Office and Confidential Print files, and show you how to search across them to discover sources for your studies and research. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Transfer of Status Presentations

May 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

*Eleri Hedley Carter*, ‘Meanings of the home, family, and the welfare state to women in late-modern Britain’ *Freya Willis*, ‘Who Cares? Social Care Workers’ Experiences of Work, Gender, and Class in England and Wales 1979-2010’

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Title TBC

May 16, 2024, 2 p.m.

Meta-training neural networks to control themselves

May 16, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

Animals learn to adapt to levels of uncertainty in the environment by monitoring errors and engaging control processes. Recently, deep networks have been proposed as theories of animal perception, cognition and learning, but there is theory that allows us to incorporate error monitoring or control into neural networks. Here, we asked whether it was possible to meta-train deep RL agents to adapt to the level of controllability of the environment. We found that this was only possible if we encouraged them to compute action prediction errors - error signals similar to those generated in mammalian medial PFC. APE-trained networks meta-learned policies in an "observe vs. bet" bandit task that closely resembled those of humans. We also show that biases in this error computation lead the network to display pathologies of control characteristic of psychological disorders, such as compulsivity and learned helplessness.

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Atkinson Memorial Lecture 2024: Daron Acemoglu

May 16, 2024, 3:30 p.m.

The Global Priorities Institute and the Oxford Department of Economics is pleased to announce the Atkinson Memorial Lecture 2024, delivered by Daron Acemoglu (MIT Economics). 3:30PM - 5PM, THURSDAY 16TH MAY 2024. This event will be followed by a drinks reception for in-person attendees

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The Social Policy Indicators (SPIN) Database: on the Dependent Variable Problem in Welfare State Research - Methods in Social Policy and Intervention Research

May 16, 2024, 4 p.m.

TBC Booking is required for people outside of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI). The registration form will be available soon. DSPI members do not need to register

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Highly efficient monolithic tandem solar cells with metal-halide perovskites

May 16, 2024, 4 p.m.

Integrating metal halide perovskite top cells with bottom cells formed by crystalline silicon or low band gap perovskites into monolithic tandem devices has recently attracted increased attention due to the high efficiency potential and application relevance of these cell architectures. Here we present our recent results on monolithic tandem combinations of perovskite top-cells with crystalline silicon, and Sn-Pb perovskites as well as tandem relevant aspects of perovskite single junction solar cells. In 2020, we have shown that self-assembled monolayers (SAM) could be implemented as appropriate hole selective contacts. The implementation of new generation SAM molecules enabled further reduction of non-radiative recombination losses with high open circuit voltages and fill factor. By fine-tuning the SAM molecular structure even further, the photostability of perovskite composition with tandem-ideal band gaps of 1.68 eV could be enhanced by reduction of defect density and fast hole extraction. That enabled a certified efficiency for perovskite/silicon tandems at 29.15%. By optical optimisations, we could further improve this value to 29.80% in 2021. Periodic nanotextures were used that show a reduction in reflection losses in comparison to planar tandems, with the new devices being less sensitive to deviations from optimum layer thicknesses. The nanotextures also enable a greatly increased fabrication yield from 50% to 95%. Moreover, the open-circuit voltage is improved by 15 mV due to the enhanced optoelectronic properties of the perovskite top cell on top of the nanotexture. In the end of 2022, we enabled a new world record for perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells at 32.5% efficiency. We demonstrated that an additional surface treatment strongly reduces interface recombination and improves the band alignment with the C60 electron transporting material. With these modifications, single junction solar cells show high open circuit voltages of up to 1.28 V in a p-i-n configuration, and we achieve 2.00 V in monolithic tandem solar cells. A comparable surface treatment was also applied to 1.80 eV band gap perovskites to enable Voc values of 1.35 V and these were integrated into monolithic all-perovskite tandem solar cells enabling a certified efficiency of 27.5%. In addition to the experimental material and device development, main scientific and technological challenges and empirical efficiency limits, as well as advanced analysis methods, will be discussed for perovskite based tandem solar cells. In addition, results on upscaling and stability of these industrial relevant tandem solar cells by thermal evaporation will be shown. Short biography of the speaker: Steve Albrecht is Professor at Technical University (TU) Berlin, Faculty IV, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Head of the Department for Perovskite Tandem Solar Cells at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB). He received his PhD in physics from the University of Potsdam for his work on understanding the conversion of photon to collected charges organic solar cells. For his PhD he was awarded the Carl-Ramsauer-Prize of the Physikalische Gesellschaft zu Berlin and the Young Researcher Prize of the Leibniz-Kolleg Potsdam. After his PhD he started as Postdoc at HZB, and in 2016 he established a young investigator research group and in 2017 the HySPRINT Innovation Lab. In 2018, he was granted with the Apple of Inspiration award by the Slovenian President followed by the Karl-Scheel-Preis of the Physikalische Gesellschaft zu Berlin and the Berliner Wissenschaftspreis in the category young scientists for his work on perovskite-based tandem solar cells. Since June 2022, he has been heading the department for perovskite tandem solar cells at HZB. In August 2022 he was promoted from Junior- to Full Professor at TU Berlin. Professor Dr Albrecht and his team have developed various high efficiency hybrid tandem solar cells such as organic/amorphous Silicon and Perovskite/ crystalline Silicon tandem solar cells. His group has enabled various certified efficiency records for Perovskite-based tandem solar cells such as 29.15%, 29.8%, and 32.5% for Perovskite/Silicon (in 2020, 2021, and 2022 respectively), and 24.16% for Perovskite/CIGS in 2020.

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OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Six

May 16, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Six: Varieties of Crisis Response: COVID-19 Fiscal Policy in the Three Worlds of Welfare Presenter: Angie Jo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Discussant: Dr Kerim Can Kavakli, Bocconi University A Matter of Policy Type: Comparing Populist Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic Presenter: Dr Marina Schenkel, Trinity College Dublin Discussant: Marjolaine Lamontagne, McGill University The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 16:00-17:30 BST.

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Subject Pedagogy Seminar: Curiosity-based problem solving and problem posing

May 16, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

Curiosity is sometimes conceptualized as a psychological state that includes recognition of a knowledge gap, anticipation that it may be possible to close the gap, and an intrinsically motivated desire to do so. Conceptualized in this way, curiosity can be theoretically linked to mathematical problem solving and problem posing. In this talk, I attempt to explore this link in didactic situations that combine problem posing and problem solving as one multi-stage activity. I will argue for three possible roles for curiosity: curiosity as a manifestation of learning autonomy that can be captured as a basis for problem posing and problem solving, curiosity as an emotional state that can be triggered during problem posing and then mediate it, and curiosity as a human trait that can be developed by means of repeated experience of problem posing and problem solving. I will illustrate these roles of curiosity by means of the data collected in a M.Sc. course for in-service mathematics teachers that I led in 2022.

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Peter Davidson in collaboration with Jane Stevenson, University of Oxford; The Aberdeen Reformations: Glimpses of an Alternative History

May 16, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Peter Davidson in collaboration with Jane Stevenson, University of Oxford The Aberdeen Reformations: Glimpses of an Alternative History Offered by the Faculties of History and Theology and Religion. For more information, or for the Teams link to join remotely, please contact sarah.apetrei@campion.ox.ac.uk.

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Navigating Geoeducational Dilemmas: Chinese Student Migration in Singapore

May 16, 2024, 5 p.m.

In the COVID-19 pandemic’s wake, increasing numbers of students from China are eschewing Western destinations for Asian countries including Singapore. For these student migrants, Singapore occupies a unique geoeducational position as a cultural junction (jiaohuichu) or hub between China and the West. A portmanteau of geopolitics and education, the term geoeducational refers to the reciprocal effects of both, with geopolitics conceived broadly to include politics, geography and economics. Using ethnographic interviews and observations, this talk argues that the junctional role of Singapore, a Chinese-majority Southeast Asian city-state, helps Chinese student migrants navigate their geoeducational dilemmas. These dilemmas are conditioned by rising US‒China superpower competition amid economic stagnation in China and growing xenophobia in the West. Young people in China face massive unemployment and what they term involution (neijuan), or hypercompetition for diminishing gains, while Chinese student migrants in the West confront marginalization and racism. Meanwhile, Cold War-style paranoia is ratcheting up, with migrants falling under espionage suspicions on both sides of the Pacific. Under these conditions, many see Singapore as a safe liminal place from which they can pursue their diverse goals of security, flexibility, freedom, cultural belonging and filial reciprocity ‒ either by springboarding to the West, returning to China or remaining in Singapore. Drawing from feminist geopolitics, this talk theorizes the geoeducational to illuminate tectonic shifts in global student migration patterns. It investigates the implications of these shifts for university rankings and financing, brain drain and brain gain, demographic change and state legitimacy in a time of eroding meritocracy. Zachary Howlett is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Yale-NUS College at the National University of Singapore. Dr Howlett researches meritocracy and mobility in China and Chinese diasporas. He is the author of Meritocracy and Its Discontents: Anxiety and the National College Entrance Exam in China (Cornell University Press, 2021).

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Making a Difference: Community History and Social Change

May 16, 2024, 5 p.m.

Our third and final event, _*Making a Difference: Community History and Policy-Making*_ features historians and policy-makers in conversation about how community-engaged research can be harnessed as a force for good, helping to tackle inequalities and socio-political issues in local communities. We invite anyone interested in historical studies and social/political change to join us for a rich, engaging discussion. We also welcome you to get involved with our Hub’s growing network of History researchers and students by subscribing to our mailing list here: https://history.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=a9a000a334eed73ebb30a07ed&id=e45169abd9 If you have any questions about the event, booking or access requirements, please email the Community History team at "$":mailto:community@history.ox.ac.uk, and we will be happy to assist you.

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AI and the Challenge of Human Cooperation

May 16, 2024, 5 p.m.

2024 Lorna Casselton Memorial Lecture

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This Part is Silent: A Workshop in Experimental Criticism with Jodie Kim

May 16, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

In Hardly War (2016), Don Mee Cho chants, 'I refuse to translate.' She declares this over and over and over and over and over, '무궁화꽃이피었습니다.'" Opening with a short reading from THIS PART IS SILENT (WW Norton, 2024), the workshop will consider the power of working in refusal, exploring the practice of unwillingness and withholding. Participants are invited to bring an object they are uncertain about whether to keep or get rid of, something that can safely and easily be handled by others. Jodie Kim was born in Korea and raised in the American South. She has a PhD in the New Southern Gothic and her research focuses on the intersection of racial, gendered, and political violence and contemporary literature. Jodie writes as SJ Kim. She is the author of This Part is Silent, an essay collection forthcoming with W.W. Norton in April 2024. Her writing has appeared in Oxford American, Wasafiri, and The Hanok Review among other publications, and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. Her poetry and translation study received the 2021 Specimen Prize. For further information, please visit https://creatingcriticism.web.ox.ac.uk/jodie-kim or contact iris.pearson@new.ox.ac.uk. You can also sign up to our mailing list, at https://creatingcriticism.web.ox.ac.uk/workshops-experimental-criticism, to receive updates about future creative critical events.

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Journal editing in the changing marketplace: Postcolonial writing or world literature?

May 16, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

The aim of the seminar is to foster a dynamic and interdisciplinary postcolonial research culture supportive of individual scholarship. Finalists, M.St. and D.Phil. students, lecturers, fellows, scholars from across the university community – all are welcome. If you’d like to appear on the seminar mailing list, please email martha.swift@ell.ox.ac.uk OR hannah.fagan@mansfield.ox.ac.uk

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Writing Medieval Economic History during the Interwar

May 16, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Enjoy the second lecture in the ‘Uncovering Women’s History series’ entitled ‘Writing Medieval Economic History during the Interwar Years’ and delivered by *Professor Maxine Berg*. The ‘Uncovering Women’s History’ lecture series aims to explore women’s empowerment and the contribution of women and other marginalised minorities across history.

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Frankland Visitor 2024: What the hell is going on with Reality and Truth?

May 16, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Please join the Brasenose College Frankland Visitor, Joanna Kavenna, for a panel discussion with her guest speakers, Eliane Glaser, Benjamin Markovits and Phil Tinline. We live in a world of fake news, misinformation, facts that abruptly become fictions (and vice versa). How can we fathom what is real and unreal? Who can we trust? What place do the creative arts have in a reality that is (far) stranger than fiction? A panel discussion with Eliane Glaser (BBC producer and author), Kirsty Gunn (author and RLF fellow), Joanna Kavenna and Benjamin Markovits (author and Professor at Royal Holloway). Joanna Kavenna is a prize-winning author whose novels include ZED, The Ice Museum, Inglorious, The Birth of Love and A Field Guide to Reality. Her short stories and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the London Review of Books, Zoetrope and the Paris Review among other publications. Kavenna's writing has garnered the Orange Prize for New Writing, the Alistair Horne and Harper-Wood Fellowships and she was named as one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists. Eliane Glaser writes widely on political propaganda, manipulation, and has decades of experience as a BBC producer including on Front Row, Start the Week and Free Thinking. Eliane's books include Get Real: How to See Through the Hype, Spin and Lies of Modern Life, about how ideology works in contemporary politics, culture and media. She writes comment pieces and reviews for a number of publications, including The Guardian, The Independent, The New Statesman and The London Review of Books. Benjamin Markovits is the author of seven novels including Either Side of Winter and You Don't Have to Live Like This. He has published essays, stories, poetry and reviews on subjects ranging from the Romantics to American sports in the Guardian, Granta, The Paris Review and The New York Times. In 2013 Granta selected him as one of their Best of Young British Novelists and in 2015 he won the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence Award and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Phil Tinline is a leading producer of historical narrative documentaries. His extensive work for BBC Radio 4 explored such themes as the struggles of working-class Tories, the ‘revolutions’ of 1968, the birth of the EU, Orwell’s road to Nineteen Eighty Four, a 1981 NATO nuclear wargame and brainwashing, and has involved conducting a large number of interviews with politicians past and present. He has written for the Independent on Sunday, the Observer, the Guardian, BBC History Magazine and the New Statesman. His first book, The Death of Consensus, is published by Hurst and was named by The Times as their Politics Book of the Year in 2022.

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The 2024 John Stuart Mill Lecture - Wrongs not righted: Mill, Morant Bay and the Limits of Liberalism

May 16, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

In this lecture, Prof. Hall will reflect on the long, entangled and unequal relation between Britain and Jamaica: the wrongs of slavery and colonialism that are not only not requited but continue to damage the lives of Jamaican people. Her focus will then turn to the events of 1865-6, the rebellion at Morant Bay and Mill’s unsuccessful attempts to assert the need for impartial justice in the Empire. Neither liberalism nor neo-liberalism can meet the challenge of structural inequalities and systemic racisms.

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Challenges for surgeons during humanitarian deployments

May 17, 2024, 8 a.m.

Coffee, tea and pastries will be served in the Lecture Theatre. Please email Louise King (louise.king@nds.ox.ac.uk) if you would like to attend online.

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CONFERENCE 'Franco-British relations and Europe, from membership of the EEC to Brexit. Around the Pompidou / Heath archives ’

May 17, 2024, 9 a.m.

Under the High Patronage of Mr Emmanuel MACRON President of the French Republic The fiftieth anniversary of the death of the French President Georges Pompidou 1974-2024 As part of the fiftieth anniversary of the death of President Georges Pompidou (1911 1974), the one of Prime Minister Edward Heath's departure from 10 Downing Street (1974) and the hundred and twentieth anniversary of the Entente Cordiale (1904), the Institut Georges Pompidou, founded in 1989 by former French Prime Ministers Édouard Balladur and Pierre Messmer, offers a historiographical and methodological review of the contemporary history of Franco-British relations in the light of European issues, from the United Kingdom's membership into the European Economic Community (1973) to Brexit: power, economic, industrial and monetary policy, diplomacy, defence and culture. The Edward Heath Archives (Weston Library), the transfer of the private archives of the Pompidou family to the Archives Nationales (2019), the Presidential Archives (Archives Nationales), and the oral archives of the Institut Georges Pompidou provide new opportunities for transnational and comparative research. We hope the discussions between French and British researchers and archivists will promote new research fields and inspire collaborations and partnerships between French and British institutions. Programme 9h00: Welcome and introduction (Pascal Marty, Olivier Sibre) 1st session : Les grands enjeux / the big challenges Présidence / chair : Dominic Grieve 9h15: Anne Deighton (Oxford University)Into the European Community at Last: Reinventing Britain as a European Power? 9h35: Agnès Tachin (Université de Cergy-Pontoise)Turning the Tables: General de Gaulle's vetoes of Britain's applications to join the EEC. 9h55: Marie-Claude Esposito (Université Paris III Sorbonne-Nouvelle)« Compétition and Credit Control » : une réforme radicale de la réglementation bancaire durant la mandature d’Edward Heath. 10h10: Discussion 10h40: Pause/break 10h55: Stéphane Porion (Université de Tours)The « Powell effect » on the Conservative Party's stance on the European question (from Heath to Thatcher: 1970-1988). 11h15: Piers Ludlow (LSE)French and British politics and influence in Brussels, from Ortoli/Jenkins European Commission presidencies to the Thatcher-Delors conflict. 11h35: Béatrice Heuser (Glasgow University)Franco-British Strategic Relations: rivalry or vital cooperation? 11h55: Discussion 12h30/12h45 : Déjeuner/lunch 2nd session. Archives et recherche: nouvelles perspectives / Archives and research : new perspectives. Présidence/chair : Anne Deighton 13h45: Olivier Sibre (Institut Georges Pompidou)Conserver la mémoire et écrire l’histoire des Présidents de la Ve République : l’exemple de l’Institut Georges Pompidou. 14h00: Bénédicte Fichet (Archives nationales)Conservation des archives des présidents de la République en France : l'exemple de Georges Pompidou. 14h20: Susan Thomas et Jeremy McIlwaine (Bodleian Libraries)Sir Edward Heath’s archive in context: political archives in the UK 14h40-14h50: Pause/break 14h55: Daniel Furby (EPLO, Athens)Edward Heath, Georges Pompidou and Britain's entry to the European Community: historiography and sources 15h15: Cesare Vagge (Oxford University)Waging the « Economic War »: Georges Pompidou, Ted Heath and Industrial Policy at the end of the Glorious Thirty (1969-74) 15h35: Boris Hamzeian (Centre national d’art contemporain Georges Pompidou)The constellation of sources for a new history of the Centre Pompidou of Paris. Defragmenting private and public collections between French, British and Italian institutions. 15h55 – 16h30/45: Discussion and conclusion Organised by the Institut Georges Pompidou Contact: administration@georges-pompidou.org

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Title TBC

May 17, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Mini-course on relational contracts and related topics: Lecture 5

May 17, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Visit the website for more details: https://www.ludvigsinander.net/mini-courses.html

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From Sicily to Sumatra: Conference in Honour of Professor Jeremy Johns

May 17, 2024, 10 a.m.

Over the last four decades, Professor Jeremy Johns has been a leading researcher on the history of the Islamic Mediterranean, particularly Sicily, and a pillar of the advanced study of Islamic art and archaeology at Oxford. This conference, organised to mark his retirement, brings together speakers from among his former students and closest colleagues to celebrate his career. The topics, ranging from Europe to Southeast Asia and from early Islam to the modern era, reflect the breadth of his interests and his impact on the field. We hope the event will be a fitting testament to a scholar - to quote Malaterra’s words about Roger I of Sicily - “most eloquent in speech and cool in counsel".

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Redesigning AI

May 17, 2024, 11 a.m.

The Institute for Ethics in AI and the Oxford Martin School are pleased to announce an exclusive event featuring a keynote address by distinguished economist Professor Daron Acemoğlu, followed by commentary from expert panellists. Professor Acemoğlu's talk will argue that the current path of AI is inimical to human flourishing. Nevertheless, different institutional arrangements, ethical underpinnings, and technological vision can lead to better AI. This better AI path will need to overcome the industry's excessive focus on automation, the centralised control of information, challenges in the context of human-AI misalignment, and the disappearing diversity of information among human actors. Agenda 10.45 – 11.00 - Registration 11.00 – 12.00 - Keynote: Professor Daron Acemoğlu, Institute Professor, MIT Title: Redesigning AI Abstract: This talk will argue that the current path of AI is inimical to human flourishing. Nevertheless, different institutional arrangements, ethical underpinnings, and technological vision can lead to better AI. This better AI path will need to overcome the industry's excessive focus on automation, the centralized control of information, challenges in the context of human-AI misalignment, and the disappearing diversity of information among human actors. 12.00 – 13.00 - Panel Discussion and Q&A Isabelle Ferreras, FNRS Professor in Sociology, University of Louvain & Visiting Fellow, Institute for Ethics in AI Jeremias Adams-Prassl, Professor of Law, Magdalen College, University of Oxford & Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Law Daniel Susskind, Research Professor in Economics, King's College London & Senior Research Associate, Institute for Ethics in AI

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Ethics in AI Workshop - AI, Work and Democracy

May 17, 2024, 11 a.m.

The Institute for Ethics in AI and the Oxford Martin School are pleased to announce an exclusive afternoon event featuring in-depth panel sessions and a keynote address by distinguished economist Professor Daron Acemoğlu, who will be the Sanjaya Lall Visiting Professor during his stay in Oxford. Keynote Title: Redesigning AI Abstract: This talk will argue that the current path of AI is inimical to human flourishing. Nevertheless, different institutional arrangements, ethical underpinnings, and technological vision can lead to better AI. This better AI path will need to overcome the industry's excessive focus on automation, the centralised control of information, challenges in the context of human-AI misalignment, and the disappearing diversity of information among human actors.

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Peering beneath the ice: observing the ocean under Antarctica’s floating ice shelves

May 17, 2024, noon

Immune and inflammatory mechanisms in stroke

May 17, 2024, 1 p.m.

It is now well recognised that immune/inflammatory mechanisms contribute to stroke across the whole patient pathway, as a contributor to risk, acute injury and longer-term complications. In this seminar I will present our recent research in this area, covering both preclinical and clinical studies. This will include how infection impacts on the brain to worsen outcomes in stroke, the development of novel treatments that target thromboinflammation, how changes to immune cell function make patients susceptible to post-stroke infection and how systemic immune changes correlate with post-stroke cognitive decline. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY Professor Stuart Allan’s research expertise is in understanding the contribution of inflammation to neurological disease, with a primary focus on stroke and vascular dementia. He and colleagues in Manchester first identified the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) as a key mediator of neuronal injury following stroke and therefore a promising therapeutic target. His on-going translational research combines preclinical and clinical studies, with the overall aim of discovering new treatments that can improve patient’s lives. Current projects are focussed on inflammatory processes in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke, developing therapies for both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage, and understanding how immune/inflammatory changes contribute to post-stroke cognitive decline. He is academic lead for the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre Neuroscience Domain and Co-Director of the Geoffrey Jefferson Brain Research Centre (https://gjbrainresearch.org). Stuart is a passionate advocate of public engagement and has led many innovative projects in this area over the years.

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The Biology of Proteostasis in Health, Aging and Disease

May 17, 2024, 1 p.m.

Title TBC

May 17, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Radical Reasoning | Neurodiversity & Race in HE

May 17, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

Join us for our discussion group, Radical Reasoning. This week, we will be reviewing and analysing works surrounding neurodiversity, race, and the intersectionality of both, within UKHE as a neoliberal sector. This will lead to group discussions around accessibility, pedagogy, and inclusivity. We ask attendees to consider the main readings. Anyone who wishes to expand upon their understanding is welcome to consider the further readings provided. Regardless of the extent to which you engage with these chosen readings, we welcome anyone who is interested to attend the discussion group. Main Readings 1. Chantelle Jessica Lewis and Jason Arday, ‘We’ll see things they’ll never see: Sociological reflections on race, neurodiversity, and higher education’, The Sociological Review 71:6 (November 2023), pp. 1299 - 1321. 2. Lorna G. Hamilton & Stephanie Petty, ‘Compassionate pedagogy for neurodiversity in higher education: a conceptual analysis’, Frontiers in Psychology 14:1093290 (February 2023), pp. 1 - 9. 3. Katherine Runswick-Cole, “Us’ and ‘them’: the limits and possibilities of a ‘politics of ‘neurodiversity’ in neoliberal times’, Disability & Society 29:7 (2014), pp. 1117 - 1129. Further Readings 1. Surviving Society, ‘E121: The Surviving Alternative to Woman’s House: Vivienne Isebor’, April 2021, 52 min 14 sec, podcast. (Spotify. Apple Podcasts. Soundcloud.) 2. A. Mobeen, E. Mugaju, J. Arday, ‘At 18, I could not read, now I’m a Cambridge professor’ March 2023, BBC radio broadcast. (BBC Outlook) —-------------------- Twitter: race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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‘Mechanism for Membrane Protein Insertion and Complex Assembly’

May 17, 2024, 2 p.m.

Some consequences of phenotypic heterogeneity in living active matter

May 17, 2024, 2 p.m.

In this talk I will discuss how phenotypic heterogeneity affects emergent pattern formation in living active matter with chemical communication between cells. In doing so, I will explore how the emergent dynamics of multicellular communities are qualitatively different in comparison to the dynamics of isolated or non-interacting cells. I will focus on two specific projects. First, I will show how genetic regulation of chemical communication affects motility-induced phase separation in cell populations. Second, I will demonstrate how chemotaxis along self-generated signal gradients affects cell populations undergoing 3D morphogenesis.

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The Role of Discounting in Bargaining with Private Information

May 17, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

In this paper we analyze a continuous-time Coase setting with finite horizon, interdependent values, and different discount rates for the buyer and seller. We fully characterize the equilibrium behavior, which permits us to study how the agents’ discount rates (i.e., patience levels) shape the bargaining outcome. We find that the seller’s commitment problem persists even when she is fully patient, and that higher seller impatience may lead to higher equilibrium prices. Higher buyer impatience, on the other hand, incentivizes the buyer to trade earlier, which accelerates price decline since the seller’s commitment problem is more severe at earlier times. Under appropriate conditions, we conclude that the buyer is better off when he is more impatient, independently of his private valuation; hence, higher bargaining costs may give negotiators with private information greater bargaining power.

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May 17, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

A Region-centric Approach to International Relations and Order in East Asia

May 17, 2024, 5 p.m.

This lecture reflects upon the broader implications of the speaker’s recent research on developing region-centric approaches to investigate and understand the evolution of international relations and order in East Asia. Such approaches take seriously complex regional contexts, privilege regional perceptions and concerns, and favour research questions that arise from regional empirical patterns and experiences. Building upon the analysis in her 2020 book Rethinking Sino-Japanese Alienation (co-authored with Barry Buzan), Goh advances three propositions – about when the ‘post-war’ period actually started in East Asia; why bargains offer a better framework to explain key regional relationships and social structures; and on which great power dyad East Asia’s future relies if not the United States and China. She explains why and how each proposition significantly alters our understanding of East Asia, and advances IR theorising in general. Evelyn Goh FBA FASSA is the Shedden Professor of Strategic Policy Studies at The Australian National University, where she is also Director of the Southeast Asia Institute. A scholar of International Relations and international security, she is also a regional specialist whose areas of research span China, the United States, Northeast Asia, and Southeast Asia.

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Great Power Politics and Japan’s Immigration Dilemma

May 17, 2024, 5 p.m.

The coronavirus pandemic suddenly closed Japan’s doors to inbound tourism and migration in early 2020s. But those doors were never going to be closed indefinitely. The pandemic, originating in Wuhan, revealed the centrality of China in particular to Japan’s immigration dilemma. China’s transformation in the twenty-first century into an economic superpower has been an understudied possible motivation for Japan’s government to liberalise the country’s immigration regime as a tool for retaining influence in the Indo-Pacific region and beyond. Anand Rao is an assistant professor of political science and international relations at the State University of New York at Geneseo. His work has been published by Asian Politics & Policy, the Japan Studies Association Journal, and Lexington Books. He is a member of Cohort 5 of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future. Dr Rao was an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College during the Michaelmas Term in 2023.

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Storylistening: narrative evidence and public reasoning

May 17, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Sarah Dillon, a Cambridge Professor of Literature and Claire Craig, the Provost of Queen’s College Oxford and former director of the Government Office for Science discuss the need to take stories seriously, and how using narrative evidence can create profound new public understanding in contentious areas like climate change and AI. The challenges of using scientific evidence, of distinguishing news from fake news, and of acting well in anticipation of highly uncertain futures, are more visible now than ever before. Across all these areas of public reasoning, stories create profound new knowledge and so deserve to be taken seriously. The two authors of Storylistening: Narrative Evidence and Public Reasoning, Claire Craig and Sarah Dillon talk about their theory and practice of listening to narratives in policy areas in which decisions are strongly influenced by contentious knowledge and powerful imaginings, such as climate change and AI. They also present findings from two new storylistening projects – on future uses of space and on nuclear policy – showing how narrative evidence can be gathered and be of practical policy-relevant use.

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New Actors and the Changing Field of Peacemaking and Peacebuilding

May 18, 2024, 9 a.m.

OxPeace Annual Day-Conference, exploring new issues and actors (including A!) in peacemaking and peacebuilding worldwide. Featuring Roger Mac Ginty, professor in Defence, Development and Diplomacy in the School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University, who works on peace and conflict, particularly on the intersection between top-down and bottom-up approaches to peacemaking. He is interested in everyday peace and the different ways in which this might be captured. He co-directs the Everyday Peace Indicators project (with Pamina Firchow) and edits the Taylor and Francis journal Peacebuilding (with Oliver Richmond). He also edits the "Rethinking Political Violence" book series. Also featuring Nasreen Elsaim, young Sudanese activist and expert in energy and climate policy, recently chair of UN Secretary-General Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change, Oxford's Sam Daws on AI in relation to peacemaking and peacebuilding; and a range of further speakers, and time for interaction and discussion. Undergraduates, Postgrads, academic staff, practitioners, policy makers and all are welcome.

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Workshop - Mastering the Essentials of Grounded Theory

May 20, 2024, 9 a.m.

Dates: 20-24 May (online) and 31 May (in person at Kellogg) Discover the potential of Grounded Theory, a leading research method in today’s academic and professional fields, at the Mastering the Essentials of Grounded Theory Workshop. This intensive session demystifies the process for newcomers, guiding them through its complex stages with a practical, hands-on approach. Led by an expert in Grounded Theory, participants will learn to craft theories addressing social issues, and master techniques they can use in their PhD or other research projects. Join us for a learning experience that promises to enhance your analytical skills and theoretical understanding. At the end of the workshop participants will be able to: Understand the philosophies, purposes and practices of Grounded Theory methodology Analyse data using open, focused, and theoretical coding Present and defend their findings Assess the quality of Grounded Theory research projects Registration Limited enrolment – early registration recommended Deadline for registration 10 May 2024 Certificate of completion provided at the end To register your interest please email gregory.hadley@kellogg.ox.ac.uk

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Graduate Research Symposium

May 20, 2024, 11 a.m.

Please join us for the 2023-24 Kellogg Graduate Research Symposium. Kellogg students will present their research in a series of discussions and Q&A’s. More details about speakers and timing will be made available shortly.

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iSkills: Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th-21st centuries

May 20, 2024, 11 a.m.

Newspapers are a valuable resource for researching not only news but also many other aspects of political, economic, social and cultural life. In this online session we will introduce key online sources of news and how to make best use of them. The focus will be on historical and contemporary newspapers from the 17th century across most countries of the world. After the session participants will understand: the value of newspapers in research; the difficulties of using newspapers in research and effective search techniques, and be able to use a range of sources for searching and reading. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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What Economists Really Do: The Economics of Refugees and Migration

May 20, 2024, noon

Dennis Egger will present the Economics of Refugees and Migration

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TBC

May 20, 2024, noon

Student support and tuition fee systems in comparative perspective.

May 20, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

In this presentation, we will outline a new approach to the comparative analysis of student finance systems based on social rights, an approach widely applied in other areas of social policy. It focuses on rights codified in national legislation and financed by central governments, and the collection of indicators measuring formal eligibility and entitlements using model family analyses techniques. We illustrate the usefulness of the approach by exploring the relationship between the generosity and the degree of low-income targeting of student support in 21 OECD countries. The results show that student support is less generous in countries that concentrate benefits on students from low-income families. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81975404371?pwd=NzR1WEo5MXRVL0w4SzQ5TzRmUE5Jdz09

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The migration of Hong Kong people to the UK

May 20, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Seminar 5 of Trinity Term's Sociology Seminar Series Please join either in person or online. For in-person attendees, the talk will be preceded by a light lunch at 12.15pm. Please email comms@sociology.ox.ac.uk with any questions or to receive the Microsoft Teams link.

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Title TBC

May 20, 2024, 1 p.m.

Brain changes following hypertensive disorders of pregnancy

May 20, 2024, 2 p.m.

Itinerant Belonging: Gujarat’s Merchant Havelis and Occluded Histories of Indian Ocean Capitalism

May 20, 2024, 3 p.m.

The Society for the Protection of Science and Learning (SPSL): a “République des lettres” in the twentieth century

May 20, 2024, 4 p.m.

In the central decades of the twentieth century, the aid to academic refugees who escaped from dictatorial regimes that prosecuted them for their race, religion or political ideology became a relevant scientific, political, and diplomatic question. As a new “Republic of Letters”, numerous individuals and organizations provided shelter, help and grants, initially for those escaping from Nazi Germany, and later for those suffering the tragic consequences of the war and post-war. From Hitler's rise to power in 1934 to the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1956, more than twenty years of dramatic upheavals and human suffering brought many brilliant minds to exile in desperate need of help. From a postcolonial perspective, this paper presents a new research project that aims to critically analyse the circulation of refugee scholars in the central decades of the 20th century as a source of coproduction of new knowledge in different fields. It also discusses the potential interest of the Archive of the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning (SPSL) (Bodleian Library, Oxford). The SPSL was founded in the UK, in 1933 - as the Academic Assistance Council (ACC) -, by a small group of academics (Leo Szilard, Lord Rutherford, Charles Singer among others) to provide short-term grants and help refugees in finding new employment.

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Title TBC

May 20, 2024, 4:05 p.m.

(Re)Présentez vos armes au roi. A Socio-Cultural History of the Militarization of the Courts of Versailles and Vienna in the 18th Century

May 20, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

Transoceanic Trauma, Haunted Waters: Enslavement, Impressment and Whaling in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Sylvia’s Lovers

May 20, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Brain vulnerability for psychosis: from mechanisms to real-world outcomes

May 21, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

New approaches that bridge knowledge across genes and proteins to cells to whole-brain networks and to behaviour are beginning to transform our understanding of how the brain works in health and disease. Translation of neuroimaging results depend on this mechanistic understanding and is critical for discovery of new druggable targets. This talk will provide an overview of recent work using in our lab combining multimodal brain imaging methods to ask questions about the interactions between neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and neuroanatomy in psychosis vulnerability, with a focus on brain excitation-inhibition balance. I will discuss our recent research using preclinical models and bioinformatic approaches to delineate with increased precision of the biological mechanisms involved in the human neuroimaging observations. We also apply experimental medicine approaches to probe how to intervene on those mechanisms early to prevent or delay the development of psychosis. Finally, and in parallel, we work to integrate this mechanistic understanding with large-scale approaches to neuroimaging data (ENIGMA Schizotypy) and real-world clinical outcomes using electronic health records. https://zoom.us/j/95199401096?pwd=ancrZ0U1b0RNVmlKL0tQdTQ5SzhLUT09 Meeting ID: 951 9940 1096 Passcode: 937384

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Thesis and report writing (in-person)

May 21, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS This course covers methods of managing and controlling the process of thesis and report writing, as well as meeting deadlines. It also discusses the principles and practice of high-quality scholarly writing. It includes:  The production of reports, papers and theses from a time and project management point of view.  The writing task itself: this includes logical argument construction, the importance of structure in a document, appropriate style to be used in academic writing, and how to make the actual writing process as pain-free and effective as possible.  An opportunity for you to critique a short paper with your group.

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Oxford Immunology Network seminar: climate change and health

May 21, 2024, 10 a.m.

Professor Sophie Yacoub, OUCRU: Climate and health: dengue research in Vietnam Professor Sonia Lewycka, OUCRU: TBC

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Leading Collaboration - bringing people together to achieve the extraordinary (in-person)

May 21, 2024, 10 a.m.

Collaborations can be rewarding or draining, depending on how well people connect. In this course we look at what neuroscience has taught us about how to collaborate. You will make sense of why some of your collaborations have felt great to be part of, while others have been a drag. You will diagnose problems with collaborations you are part of and find practical solutions for improving them. Leave with a clear model for improving all collaborations you are involved in. LEARNING OUTCOMES  Understand the social drivers that affect the way people behave in collaborations.  Identify what has contributed to your own experience of effective collaboration.  Identify clear actions that a leader can take to improve collaborations.

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Digital Scholarship coffee morning

May 21, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Join us for a digital scholarship coffee gathering – tea and coffee will be provided. There will be a lightning talk from a researcher in digital scholarship on their work, whether it’s a new project, a tool or something they want to showcase. These are a new type of event for us, so if you’d like to attend, be involved in a future session, or find out more please email digitalscholarship@humanities.ox.ac.uk These will be held in the Visiting Scholars Centre, so to attend you’ll need to bring your Bodleian Card and to leave your bags in the lockers – this event is only open to University staff and students.

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Ethox Seminar – The Ethics of Transformative Experience and Psychotherapy (provisional title)

May 21, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Abstract To follow This will be a hybrid seminar in the Big Data Institute, Lower Ground Seminar Room 0, and on Zoom. Zoom registration https://medsci.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAld-uupzIuGNPBaOMjndQsXDPLlYh4SKyE

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Developing a viable MYC inhibitor for cancer treatment: a challenging journey from the lab to the clinic

May 21, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'Genetics and a family-based approach in psychiatry'

May 21, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

Abstract to be confirmed. This is a hyrbid event, held in the Department of Psychiatry’s Seminar Room and online (Zoom). Please email shona.oleary@psych.ox.ac.uk to request the Zoom link.

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Title TBC

May 21, 2024, 1 p.m.

Hybrid Oxford Stroke Seminar - Ischemic stroke at young age: investigating the prognosis

May 21, 2024, 1 p.m.

iSkills for Medical Sciences and OUH Trust: top tips for designing a conference poster

May 21, 2024, 1 p.m.

Are you planning to present a poster at an upcoming conference, meeting or symposium? This introductory session will provide you with some top tips on how to create a poster presentation which will help you to communicate your research project and data effectively. There will be guidance on formatting, layout, content, use of text, references and images, as well as advice on printing and presenting your poster. This session will also provide help with locating resources such as templates, free-to-use images and poster guidelines. By the end of this online session you will be able to: evaluate the effectiveness of templates, formatting, text and images; and plan, prepare and present your poster. Intended audience: students, staff and researchers from MSD and OUH.

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CSAE Research Workshop Week 5

May 21, 2024, 1 p.m.

Banks in Space

May 21, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

We study the spatial expansion of banks in response to banking deregulation in the 1980s and 90s. During this period, large banks expanded rapidly, mostly by adding new branches in new locations, while many small banks exited. We document that large banks sorted into the densest markets, but that sorting weakened over time as large banks expanded to more marginal markets in search of locations with a relative abundance of retail deposits. This allowed large banks to reduce their dependence on expensive wholesale funding and grow further. To rationalize these patterns we propose a theory of multi-branch banks that sort into heterogeneous locations. Our theory yields two forms of sorting. First, span-of-control sorting incentivizes top firms to select the largest markets and smaller banks the more marginal ones. Second, mismatch sorting incentivizes banks to locate in more marginal locations, where deposits are abundant relative to loan demand, to better align their deposits and loans and minimize wholesale funding. Together, these two forms of sorting account well for the sorting patterns we document in the data.

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Irregularisation and the city: Insights from the case of Athens, Greece

May 21, 2024, 2 p.m.

This presentation discusses the presence of migrants in Athens, Greece, particularly those with irregular status. It provides an overview of the interrelationships between the city and migration, focusing on how space and society interact to determine the trajectories and settlement paths of irregular migrants. Several specific aspects are discussed, in particular how migration policies have led to the 'irregularisation' of a significant number of migrants who have been living on Greek territory for decades; how recent asylum policies and the accommodation system reinforce such tendencies and leave people unprotected; the everyday lives of undocumented migrants on the margins of the city - even when they live in its very centre; urban practices and policies implemented in the Athens metropolitan area and how they have affected the relations between migration and urban space from a critical point of view. The presentation draws on several international research projects on migration, displacement, and returns recently conducted in the case of Athens, Greece. Zoom link: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwvceGopjopGNbyNmm5O7ZfAfl3D1DokMIr

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Computational Neurotherapeutics for Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Neurology and Psychiatry

May 21, 2024, 2 p.m.

“We are religious, patriotic, and self-sacrificial”: Baniya Power, Privilege, and Wealth Anxieties in India

May 21, 2024, 2 p.m.

Wealth in India is concentrated amongst a few privileged social groups in urban areas. What is the relationship between wealth, caste, and elite action? Agarwals, a business caste in Delhi that belongs to the vernacular category baniya, is selected as the case study for analysis. By drawing on in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations made over four years, I argue that elites use caste to produce a moral and empowering self-narrative to produce caste cohesion. In the second most wealth-unequal country in the world, an empowering and shared self-definition helps address intra-group inequalities, makes indirect claims on political power that wealth alone cannot support, and addresses anxieties about wealth accumulation. Four strategies of social cohesion are unpacked: standardisation and publicization of origin myth; claiming symbolic power by naming roads, building statues, and temple complexes after one’s ancestor; institutionalising one’s resource-rich networks through registered societies in the name of the ancestor to undertake philanthropy; and claiming political power by becoming ideologically one with the nation-state and asserting that to be a baniya, is to be religious, patriotic, and self-sacrificial. This paper broadens the sociological understanding of wealth and elite power by showing how upper-caste identitarianism is undertaken by forging cohesion. Ujithra Ponniah is a Senior Researcher at the Southern Centre for Inequality Studies (SCIS). She works with the ‘Wealth Inequality and Elites’ research stream at SCIS. Her research interests include economic elites, caste, race, and gender in India and South Africa. Her research in India unpacks how a business caste called Agarwals reproduces in Delhi with a focus on the gender question. In South Africa, she has researched property elites (landowners and property developers) involved in the making of a gated city called Waterfall. Currently, she is a Co-PI on an ESRC project titled ‘Transnational Elite Communities and the Reproduction of Inequalities’ in Mumbai, Johannesburg, and London.

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"The pre-animal origins of gene regulatory pathways, from DNA methylation to pluripotency"

May 21, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

Intricate mechanisms of gene regulation are critical for eukaryotes, particularly in multicellular organisms where diverse cell types arise from differential gene expression of a single genome. However, the evolution of gene regulatory pathways has been complex, involving recurrent simplifications or expansions tied to major evolutionary transitions. In our laboratory, we delve into the origins of DNA methylation in eukaryotes, its interplay with genome evolution and Giant Viruses, and the emergence of pluripotency factors in unicellular protists closely related to animals. We employ comparative and functional genomics in non-conventional model systems to address these questions, emphasizing the significance of broad taxonomic sampling for a comprehensive understanding of eukaryotic gene regulation. Microsoft Teams meeting Meeting ID: 385 590 455 526 Passcode: Xos6sJ

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Large language models for data-driven insights from real-world health data

May 21, 2024, 3 p.m.

With rapid developments in the field of artificial intelligence and large language models in healthcare, the need for thoughtful, ethical, impactful applications is imperative. This webinar will explore the potential – and perils – of large language models to unlock new insights from the electronic health records to provide more personalized care while reducing clinician work burden. Dr. Bitterman will discuss her research in large language models for extracting information from clinical documentation, including social determinants of health. She will discuss ethical considerations of large language models for healthcare, including future directions for more robust reporting and evaluation standards.

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Open scholarship: your thesis, copyright and ORA

May 21, 2024, 3 p.m.

This online session will focus on what ORA is and how to deposit one's thesis in ORA, and how to access help with this process. It will also cover the relevant rights and permissions required and other issues that DPhil students need to take into account when preparing their thesis for upload to ORA. Topics include: what ORA is and what you need to deposit; how to deposit your thesis in ORA; observing relevant rights and permissions; and accessing help with depositing your thesis in ORA. Intended audience: all doctoral research students.

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2024 McCandless Lecture

May 21, 2024, 3:45 p.m.

*Gathering of Gatherings: Where the Local and the Catholic Meet.* Dr. Derek Hatch is Professor of Religion and Endowed Chair of Baptist Studies at Georgetown College in Kentucky. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Behavioral Science from East Texas Baptist University, a Master of Divinity degree from George W. Truett Theological Seminary at Baylor University, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in theology from the University of Dayton. He has written numerous articles and authored or co-edited three books, including Thinking with the Church: Toward a Renewal of Baptist Theology (2017). He currently serves as a member of the Baptist World Alliance’s Commission on Baptist Doctrine and Christian Unity and was a delegate to the most recent international ecumenical dialogue commission between the Baptist World Alliance and the Roman Catholic Church.

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Title TBC

May 21, 2024, 4 p.m.

What might Ship Names tell us about eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Port Elites?

May 21, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Decentering Gangs: Comparative Ethnographic Insights from Nicaragua and South Africa

May 21, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

Gangs are inherently revealing social institutions, by virtue of the fact that they are simultaneously autonomous social phenomena, with complex internal logics and dynamics, and epiphenomena, fundamentally reflecting – and shaped by – broader social structures and processes. At the same time, however, most studies of gangs are focused on a single gang or location, moreover mostly in the Global North, and as a result, despite over 100 years of gang research, we arguably still lack a proper sense of what kinds of gang dynamics might be general, and which ones are specific to particular epochs and places, and why. Drawing both long-term, longitudinal and collaborative ethnographic research, this presentation offers a "disjunctive comparison" of gang dynamics in Managua, Nicaragua, and Cape Town, in South Africa, in order to highlight how gang research needs to be both empirically and conceptually "decentered" in order to maximize the inherently revelatory potential of the phenomena.

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Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2024 - Lecture 4 - Living in “Witch Camps”: Experiences of Accused Witches and the Moral Economy of Songsim

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Lecture 4 of the Evans-Pritchard Lecture series Living in “Witch Camps”: Experiences of Accused Witches and the Moral Economy of Songsim. All are welcome to attend in person or via the Teams ID and password below: Meeting ID: 318 331 790 674 Passcode: LEecHc

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Feminist Political Economy of Peace and Decoloniality

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Addressing a range of contemporary and historical conflicts and daily struggles, this series of talks will explore how violence remains integral to the global political economy, with lasting effects on gendered hierarchies which often extend far beyond immediate war zones.

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Old Norse Research Seminar

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Countering Convergent Threats? Colombian South-South Security Cooperation in Latin America

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

https://www.lac.ox.ac.uk/event/lac-main-seminar-series-countering-convergent-threats-colombian-south-south-security-cooperati

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Ali Mirsepassi will be in conversation with Stephanie Cronin about his new book "The Loneliest Revolution: A Mamoir of Solidarity and Struggle in Iran".

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters with author Maggie Nelson

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

On the occasion of the publication of Like Love, a collection of essays written over the past 20 years, Maggie Nelson will address her genre-spanning career, which has included criticism, autobiography, lyric prose, poetry, scholarship, and art writing. Nelson will discuss the differences and overlaps between these genres, as well as between her abiding preoccupations, which include aesthetics, ethics, feminism, queer issues, art, and the unpredictable, myriad ways in which content finds form. Maggie Nelson is the author of several acclaimed books of poetry and prose, including Like Love: Essays and Conversations (2024), the national bestseller On Freedom: Four Songs of Care and Constraint (2021), the National Book Critics Circle Award winner The Argonauts (2015), The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning (2011), Bluets (2009; named by Bookforum as one of the top 10 best books of the past 20 years), The Red Parts (2007), Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions (2007), and Jane: A Murder (2005). A 2016 MacArthur fellow, she teaches at University of Southern California and lives in Los Angeles, CA.

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The Safety Net: central bank balance sheets and financial crisis 1587-2020 (with Martin Kornejew, Paul Schmelzing, Moritz Schularick)

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Oxford Energy Seminar Series – Week 5 TT24: Nuclear: Why small is beautiful

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Why are Small Modular Reactors the future for nuclear? For one, their reduced scale and off-site manufacturability: a key factor that reduces the expenses and extended timelines linked to large-scale reactors. This also brings a reduction of financial risk – a result of simplified commercial deployment – which creates a more attractive prospect for significant private sector funding. Together, these advantages can allow SMRs, particularly those using advanced (Generation IV) technology, to play a game-changing role in the energy mix for Europe and the UK, supporting the fight against climate change and energy insecurity alongside renewables while offsetting their storage and reliability costs. With the inclusion of nuclear in the EU Taxonomy and the European Commission’s creation of a European SMR Alliance, which aims to facilitate and accelerate the development, demonstration, and deployment of SMRs in Europe, SMRs and AMRs are here to stay, and this seminar highlights why they’re gaining traction.

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Air Pollution in the 21st Century – Time for a New Approach

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

In 1952, a week -long smog in London killed around 12,000 people. More than 70 years later we are yet to achieve air that does not harm our health. Over 60 thousand papers have been published on air pollution and health. Over half of these have been published in the last ten years. Globally we are exposed to more air pollution than ever before. We now know that air pollution harms our health at all stages of life from pre-birth, through childhood and during our time as adults, but policies and actions remain rooted in the science of the 20th century and not the new knowledge from the last decades. Our inability to solve this problem does not stem from a lack of evidence but from a lack of implementation, despite evidence that reducing air pollution improves health and is massively cost beneficial. The problem is not intractable but recent public controversy makes it ever harder for evidence-based actions.

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Sinologist, Traveller, Governor, Spy: The Lives and Legacies of Sir Cecil Clementi, 17th Governor of Hong Kong

May 21, 2024, 5 p.m.

Sir Cecil Clementi (金文泰) (1875-1947) arguably was the most scholarly and gifted of all Hong Kong’s 28 colonial governors. As a young official he quickly mastered Chinese and in 1904 published a scholarly translation of Zhang Ziyong’s (招子庸)(1786-1847)Cantonese Love Songs (粵謳), the laments of south China’s ‘flowerboat’ girls. He was also a tireless traveller and spy, undertaking an epic journey across China from Kashgar to Kowloon. In his official capacity, he played an important role in land settlement in the New Territories, the creation of Hong Kong University and the smooth operation of the Kowloon-Canton Railway. In this talk Graham Hutchings will share some of the findings from his work on the biography of Sir Cecil Clementi he is writing for Hong Kong University Press. Among them is Clementi’s response as Governor of Hong Kong (1925-1930) to China’s national revolution, which he sought to counter by making the colony ‘more Chinese’ and protect it from the intellectual currents sweeping through China. Graham Hutchings is an Associate at the University of Oxford China Centre and an Honorary Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations at Nottingham University. He was a foreign correspondent in the 1980s and 1990s, based first in Beijing and then Hong Kong, and was then Director of Analysis at Oxford Analytica. His most recent book is China 1949: Year of Revolution (Bloomsbury 2021).

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Inaugural lecture: “The University of Sound, The Sound University—in Theory”

May 21, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

The omens aren’t good. The Arts and Humanities Research Council and Arts Council England budgets have been cut. University departments are facing closure. Long-term underfunding has left secondary music education in a parlous state. Despite the rhetoric, government policies are threatening to make music and related arts the preserve of the few. At this conjuncture, I sketch out another future for a university throughout which sound—in thought and practice—would resonate broadly, cutting across disciplinarity and permeating the ways in which the university addresses itself internally and to the wider world. Relying on a felicitous homonym in English, I exploit the adjectival sense of sound to enquire after the health and integrity of the university in the years ahead. Further, I ask what role “the university of sound” has to play in sounding out planetary wellbeing in the face of multiple crises of climate catastrophe, runaway inequality, democratic disaffection, revanchist ethnonationalisms, and proliferating forms of extractivism. As a provocation, I set out an intellectual and political project, driven by transdisciplinary theories of sound, for the Du Boisian abolition and reconstruction of the university as a democratic institution. In this vision, “the sound university” of the future would assume the mantle of auscultating the world and of returning echoes that imagine and remake it otherwise.

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Fugitive Histories and Gothic Pursuits: The Manhunt Narrative in Romantic-Era Fiction

May 21, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

A green and pleasant land for nature, food, energy, and people

May 21, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Delivering net zero requires restoring the UK’s natural environment, as does meeting critical biodiversity targets. But the UK’s limited territory also faces acute demand for food production, housing, and energy. How do we balance these objectives? Biographies: Thomas Hale is Professor at the Blavatnik School of Government and St Antony’s College, Oxford. His research explores how we can manage transnational problems effectively and fairly. He co-leads the Net Zero Tracker and the Net Zero Regulation and Policy Hub. His latest book is Long Problems: Climate Change and the Challenge of Governing across Time (Princeton, 2024). Chris Skidmore served as MP for Kingswood from 2010-2024. In 2022-2023 he led the Government’s net zero review. He was Minister of State jointly at the Department for Education and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy 2019-2020. He was previously Minister of State at the Department of Health and Social Care between, at the Department for Education, and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Chris also served as Parliamentary Secretary at the Cabinet Office. Chris was educated at Bristol Grammar School before studying history at Oxford, where he continued with postgraduate research. He is a Visiting Parliamentary Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, for the 2023-2024 academic year. Alex Sobel was elected MP for Leeds North West in 2017. A graduate of the University of Leeds, his background is in the social enterprise sector. In 2019 Alex helped form the Net Zero All-Party Parliamentary Group. In 2020 he was appointed as the shadow minister for Tourism and Heritage, and in 2021 we was appointed as shadow minister for Nature Recovery and the Domestic Environment in the Opposition DEFRA Team. He is a Visiting Parliamentary Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, for the 2023-2024 academic year. Mark Owen-Lloyd is the Director of the Botley West Solar Farm project currently proposed for development in West Oxfordshire. He has worked on this project and others with Photovolt Development Partners since 2019. Prior to this, he served as the head of UK power trading at E.On UK, before moving to Dusseldorf as the head of power and carbon trading. Before entering the energy market, he spent the early part of his career as a Eurobond trader at Nomura. He holds an MA in Modern History from Christ Church college, Oxford.

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iSkills: Working with sensitive research data

May 22, 2024, 10 a.m.

A workshop outlining some of the key principles to bear in mind when working with sensitive or restricted research; whether collected yourself or obtained from a third-party source such as a data archive. Issues of confidentiality, informed consent, cybersecurity and data management will be covered. Examples of scenarios or concerns drawn from the research of participants are particularly welcome. The role of support services at Oxford will also be outlined and in particular the role of the Bodleian Data Librarian who will lead the session. Follow up consultations with the Data librarian or other subject consultants are also offered. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Title TBC

May 22, 2024, 11 a.m.

Union Leaders: Experimental Evidence from Myanmar

May 22, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Social movements are catalysts for crucial institutional changes. To succeed, they must coordinate members’ views (consensus building) and actions (mobilization). We study union leaders within Myanmar’s burgeoning labour movement. Union leaders are positively selected on both personality traits that enable them to influence others and ability but earn lower wages. In group discussions about workers’ views on an upcoming national minimum wage negotiation, randomly embedded leaders build consensus around the union’s preferred policy. In an experiment that mimics individual decision-making in a collective action set-up, leaders increase mobilization through coordination. Leaders empower social movements by building consensus that encourages mobilization. Written with Laura Boudreau (Columbia University, CEPR, and IGC), Rocco Macchiavello (LSE Department of Management, STICERD, and IGC) and Mari Tanaka (Hitotsubashi University Institute of Economic Research) https://sites.google.com/view/virginiaminni/research

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Session 5: What is involved in leading and managing an Agile Sprint? (online webinar)

May 22, 2024, 1 p.m.

Gain best practice insights on leading and managing a rapid, policy-relevant interdisciplinary Sprint while supporting researcher career development. This workshop is open to: Oxford University researchers planning to lead and manage an Agile Sprint team; Oxford University researchers leading other short-term policy-relevant interdisciplinary research project teams; early- and mid-career researchers who might be interested in the autumn Agile Sprint call. This workshop will cover what is involved in leading and managing an Agile Sprint team based on best practice learning from Sprints to date, including integrating career development opportunities for Sprint researchers within team and individual work plans. Much of this is also applicable to those embarking on their first PI role on a short-term research project. By the end of this workshop, you will understand how to effectively lead and manage an Agile Sprint team through: Identifying who else you need to recruit or engage in the Sprint based on perspectives and experiences missing from the team Starting well, including developing a positive research culture for different identities within the team and a shared sense of purpose and supportive collaboration that allows everyone a voice and opportunities to develop Planning realistic workloads that plot the interrelationships between work packages that allow for the Researcher Concordat 10 days’ development time, and continuous integration to ensure ongoing team engagement Managing a Sprint budget and working with the Agile programme support team. “While meeting the ‘Sprint’ pace is challenging, it helps the team focus and streamline research and stakeholder engagement activities in a way not commonly seen in conventional projects. This short period of intense involvement can expedite early-career researchers’ development but also means the Sprint PI needs to dedicate time to support their researchers’ career planning throughout the Sprint.” -Professor Aidong Yang Book your place on the workshop using the links provided. If you need to cancel your place, please do so no later than 48 hours before the workshop. By booking on this workshop, you have agreed to the externally facing use of the recording. Book another session, by viewing the series event page. Participation: Please note you will be expected to actively participate, which includes joining discussion, listening, asking questions, and contributing to activities.

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Truth or dare: navigating misinformation in EU elections

May 22, 2024, 1 p.m.

Peter Pomerantsev is a Soviet-born British journalist, author and TV producer. He is a senior fellow at Johns Hopkins University and co-director of the Arena Initiative. Born in Kyiv, Ukraine, Peter grew up in the U.K. He is the author of several books about Russian and other authoritarian propaganda; the third of these, How to Win an Information War: The Propagandist Who Outwitted Hitler, was published in 2024

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Retroviral legacy in immunity and cancer

May 22, 2024, 1:30 p.m.

Effective Data Management Techniques

May 22, 2024, 2 p.m.

Planning: Effective data management techniques - Trinity Term 2024 Maintaining well-organised data is essential for researchers to keep accurate records of fieldwork data and make informed decisions. The techniques and strategies for securely managing data may differ depending on the field sites, types and amount of data, and the system or database used for data collection and analysis. Some may find online data storage to be the best option, while it may not be ideal for those working in remote areas. In this workshop, post-fieldworkers will be sharing their experience and knowledge on managing data in the field. The discussion will cover various topics, such as effective methods and strategic planning for storing, organising, and updating data on both online and offline platforms, as well as some potential challenges and drawbacks that may arise. We will also delve into practical tools and techniques for backing up data and enhancing security measures to safeguard the confidentiality of the data during and after data collection in the field. Chair Keiko Kanno Panellists for TT 24 TBC

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Oxford Technology & Security Nexus — "Cloud empires’ physical footprint: How trade and security politics shape the global expansion of U.S. and Chinese data centre infrastructures"

May 22, 2024, 3 p.m.

This week, Dr. Vili Lehdonvirta and Boxi Wu will be presenting on their paper (written in conjunction with Zoe Hawkins): “Cloud empires’ physical footprint: How trade and security politics shape the global expansion of U.S. and Chinese data centre infrastructures” Paper Abstract U.S.-China technological rivalry presents dilemmas for third countries. Cloud computing infrastructure has become an acute front in this rivalry because of the infrastructural power that it affords over increasingly cloud-based economies, and because it is a control point in AI governance. We ask what factors explain a third country’s “cloud infrastructure alignment”—the degree to which the country’s local cloud computing infrastructure belongs to U.S. versus Chinese providers. Based on literature, we sketch three different answers: international trade, digital imperialism, and third-country strategic choice. In the first quantitative study on the topic, we test propositions derived from these views using original data on global hyperscale cloud infrastructure combined with trade statistics and security variables. We find that cloud infrastructure alignment is positively associated with other imports from the U.S. or China, negatively associated with interstate disputes, and only weakly associated with security cooperation ties. The findings suggest that commercial interests and third-country strategic choice may be more influential in shaping cloud infrastructure than any imperialist expansion or containment by the superpowers. We conclude that researchers should direct more attention to the role of third-country agency in technology geopolitics, and to the role of tech firms as autonomous geopolitical actors. About the speakers Prof. Vili Lehdonvirta Vili Lehdonvirta is Professor of Economic Sociology and Digital Social Research at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. He leads a research group examining the politics and socio-economic implications of digital technologies. He is one of the world’s most cited authors on gig work and the platform economy. His current research examines the geopolitics of digital infrastructures. His books Cloud Empires: How digital platforms are overtaking the state and how we can regain control and Virtual Economies: Design and analysis are published by MIT Press. He is a frequent keynote speaker and has advised the European Commission, the World Bank, and other public, private, and third-sector organizations on digital policy and governance. Lehdonvirta’s latest book Cloud Empires was shortlisted for the Association of American Publishers’ 2023 PROSE Award. “It is a highly accessible and refreshingly original book, and a must-read for anyone interested in our digital past, present, or future” (Regulation & Governance). The book questions the current paradigm of platform competition regulation and puts forward a historically grounded argument towards the democratization and constitutionalization of transnational digital institutions. “The hypothesis underlying the book is bold: the organization of virtual space by digital platforms follows a trajectory similar to the social organization of Western societies in the past centuries” (Information, Communication & Society). Cloud Empires has been adopted as a textbook in undergraduate and graduate courses in economic sociology, organization studies, and political theory. An Italian translation is published by Einaudi, with translations to Chinese and Japanese forthcoming. From 2018 to 2021 Lehdonvirta served on the European Commission’s Expert Group on the Online Platform Economy, advising policy makers on platform regulation and governance. From 2015 to 2021 Lehdonvirta led the iLabour research project, a major investigation funded by the European Research Council on the implications of digital platforms to labour markets, global development, and collective action. One of the project’s outputs was the Online Labour Index, an automated statistics production system adopted by researchers, journalists, and international organizations. At the project’s conclusion the system was transferred to the International Labour Organization to be maintained as a public research resource. The project also produced over a dozen highly cited articles in journals such a Socio-Economic Review, Sociology, and Journal of Management. According to a 2021 bibliometric analysis, Lehdonvirta co-authored the top two most cited studies in gig economy research. From 2018 to 2019 Lehdonvirta served on the European Commission’s High-Level Expert Group on Digital Transformation and EU Labour Markets, advising policy makers on issues such as access to platform data. Lehdonvirta’s current research focuses on the international political economy and geopolitics of digital infrastructures. His Political Geography of AI Infrastructure research project seeks to map the world’s GPU compute, one of the key bottlenecks in AI system development and operation. Lehdonvirta’s group uses both conventional social science research methods as well as novel data science approaches to map infrastructures and model policy impacts. His research has been supported by major grants from the European Research Council, the UK Economic and Social Research Council, and other science funding agencies. Lehdonvirta is a Senior Research Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, an associate member of the Department of Sociology, Oxford, and a former Turing Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute, London. He co-organizes the Digital Economy Network of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics and sits on the editorial boards of the journals Information Society and Journal of International Business Policy. From 2013 to 2018 he was editor of the journal Policy & Internet. In 2022-2023 he served on the European Research Council’s Social Sciences and Humanities Advanced Grants panel. Lehdonvirta holds a PhD in Economic Sociology from the University of Turku (2009) and a MSc from the Helsinki University of Technology (2005). He has previously worked at the London School of Economics, the University of Tokyo, and the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology. In 2020 he was a visiting professor at the Institute of Innovation Research, Hitotsubashi University. Before his academic career Lehdonvirta worked as a software developer. Boxi Wu Boxi Wu works in Google DeepMind’s Responsible AI team, focusing on the ethical and societal implications of frontier AI models across both LLMs and multimodal models. They advise teams on ethical risks and mitigations, and lead internal ethics & safety governance fora, alongside their part-time studies in the MSc in Social Science at the OII. Their research interests focus on the social and political impacts of AI, focusing on the materiality of AI infrastructure and implications for AI ethics and governance, working with Professor Vili Lehdonvirta to map global AI infrastructure. Other research interests include the politics of AI compute as a geostrategic resource for nation-states. They are also an organiser and programmer with ESEA Green Lions, where they have worked with local museums and galleries on events that bring the public into conversation with questions on AI, the environment and diaspora. They have previously worked as a policy researcher, lecturer and strategy consultant.

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Using, misusing, and abusing education research journals

May 22, 2024, 3 p.m.

In recent decades, the broad field of education research has shown robust growth in the number of journals and articles published, coupled with the use of metrics associated with journals to assess the "impact" of scholars. And yet, despite the growth and crucial functions of journals in the field, it is rare to find satisfied editors, authors, reviewers, and readers. Most journals are under great stress to effectively work with authors and reviewers and struggle with multiple demands, such as finding reliable metrics of impact, increasing the diversity of authors, editorial boards, and readership, maintaining viable funding, and adapting to the evolving uses of AI and the growing cases of scientific misconduct. Recognizing the intricate interplay between conceptual orientations, accountability systems, funding models, and reputation in academic publishing, I will focus on reward and assessment structures in the political economy of education journals. In this scenario, the reward structures used in the field often and perversely discourage journals from considering interdisciplinary collaborations or acknowledging different epistemological standpoints and wastefully ignoring scholarship from multiple regions. I advocate for a transformative shift towards frameworks that de-emphasize using journals as proxies for assessing scholars. Instead, I encourage collaborative interdisciplinary approaches, multilingual teamwork, open data sharing, non-commercialized funding, and stakeholder engagement. By fostering these strategies, the whole field of education research could improve scholarly rigor, trustworthiness, usability, and relevance.

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The Adam Phillips Seminar – The Poet’s Essay: Peter Gizzi

May 22, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

The next seminar will focus on Peter Gizzi and will take place on Wednesday 22nd May at 4.30 pm, Pusey Room. No tickets, free entry, all welcome. Reading material will be made available via pdf: https://www.keble.ox.ac.uk/teaching-research/poetry-at-keble/the-poets-essay/ Enquiries: please contact Matthew Bevis.

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Valedictory Lecture – A ‘Class’-Less Society Japan? How is Inequality Interpreted Without the Concept of Class?

May 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

I was puzzled why Japanese sociologists who study social mobility or social inequality don't use the concept of "class" or kaikyu(階級)in Japanese, while using the term when writing in English. In Japanese, instead, they use kaisho (階層), whose literal translation in English is “strata.” In this seminar, as a sociologist of knowledge to study Japanese society, I will explore how and why the concept of class (kaikyu) disappeared in academic writings among sociologists, and what societal consequences this disappearance has produced, especially its influence on the interpretation of inequality in Japanese society, which is often called "kakusa shakai" (格差社会) or a gap society. This event will serve as Professor Kariya's valedictory lecture, marking the culmination of his distinguished academic career. We warmly invite everyone to join us for this special occasion. Professor Takehiko Kariya joined the University of Oxford in 2008. After completing his BA and MA degrees at the University of Tokyo, he studied at Northwestern University in the US, where he got his PhD in Sociology in 1988. After going back to Japan, he worked at the National Institute of Multimedia Education from 1988 to 1991, and then moved to the Graduate School of Education, University of Tokyo, where he taught sociology of education for almost two decades until he came to Oxford. His teaching at Oxford includes the Sociology of Japanese Society and Research Methods for Japanese Studies. His research interests cover sociology of education; social stratification and social mobility; social changes of Postwar Japan; social and educational policies. He was recently awarded a Japanese Medal of Honour with Purple Ribbon (紫綬褒章), the Medal awarded to individuals who have made an outstanding contribution to academic and artistic developments, improvements, and accomplishments.

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(Global) value chains in a changing world: challenges and opportunities

May 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

The past fifty years have been characterised by a massive wave of globalisation, which provided lowered prices, access to a wide variety of goods and services, and reduced global poverty. However, this historic growth has recently come to a standstill, and both natural events and geopolitical tensions have shown that globalisation can exacerbate vulnerabilities and dependency on third parties. In this talk, Professor Glenn Magerman, Oxford Martin Visiting Fellow, INET Oxford, will discuss the role of (global) value chains in driving growth, welfare and inequality, the impact of supply chain policies on socio-economic outcomes, and how we can make our societies more resilient to future natural and geopolitical shocks. This is a joint event with INET Oxford. This event will be followed by a drinks reception, all welcome. REGISTRATION To register to attend in person in Oxford: https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/events/global-value-chains/ To register to watch live online on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/c/global-value-chains

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Plastics – future options to improve sustainability

May 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

We all recognise current global plastics production is unsustainable. Yet these materials can often improve sustainability through insulation, light-weighting of vehicles and future clean technologies. So how can chemistry and materials science improve the sustainability of plastics? In this talk Trinity Fellow, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry Charlotte Williams OBE will explore all the available options including renewables, efficient recycling, and building in sustainability at the earliest stages of technological development.

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Ask them what and whom they liked: Montesquieu, Smith and others

May 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

Post-Globalism and the Ulama: Contestation of Authority

May 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

Forced Migration on Film: A Conversation with Marc Isaacs

May 22, 2024, 5 p.m.

Since 2001, Marc Isaacs has made more than sixteen creative documentaries for the BBC and Channel 4. His films have won Grierson, Royal Television Society and BAFTA awards as well as numerous international film festival prizes. In 2006, Marc had a retrospective at the prestigious Lussas Documentary film festival in France and his work has been included in numerous documentary books and academic studies. In 2008, Marc received an honorary doctorate from the University of East London for his documentary work. Marc has been a guest tutor at numerous universities and film schools in the UK and overseas including the London Film School and the National Film and Television School. A complete box set of his films was released by Second Run DVD in 2018. Event details: https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/forced-migration-on-film-a-conversation-with-marc-isaacs-annual-elizabeth-colson-lecture-2024

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Prof Simon Coleman | Lecture 4 'A New Pilgrimage Ethic: On the Secular and the Serious’

May 22, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Lecture Four ‘A New Pilgrimage Ethic: On the Secular and the Serious’ [Wednesday 22 May, from 5:15 to 6:45 pm, Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel College] Victor and Edith Turner consciously adapted Weberian imagery when they argued that a Pilgrimage Ethic, with its emphasis on the benefits of holy travel, helped to create the communications networks that would enable the development of mercantile and industrial capitalism. Themes of both materiality and secularity continue to haunt Euro-American images of religion in general, and pilgrimage in particular, often resulting in a seemingly endless and restless search for authenticity. In this final lecture, I present an alternative view of pilgrimage as moral action and affective stance, which considers its articulations with theories of mobility and political economy alongside the now extensive anthropology of ethics. I ask whether pilgrimage—manifested at contexts like Walsingham and the Camino, but also away from conventional experiences of travel—might be viewed as a refractive, transposable form of ‘seriousness’ as well as political action that goes beyond oppositions between the earnest and the playful, the authentic and the inauthentic, the religious and the secular. ……………………………………………………………………………………………..

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Advanced presentation skills (online)

May 23, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS  You will learn how to read a group, deal with difficult situations, use humour, match your presentation to the audience, and make an impact.  You will learn how to get your message across so it is remembered.  You will learn about timing and when you should deliver key messages.  You will develop your self-awareness and understand its role in presenting. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this session you will understand more about:  How to structure your presentation for impact.  How your psychological state affects your presentation skills and how you can manage it.  How to read a group and how to deal with difficult situations.  How to deliver your presentation with more confidence.

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Title TBC

May 23, 2024, 11 a.m.

Centrosome function in health and disease: a small organelle with a big reach

May 23, 2024, noon

Centrosomes are small cytoplasmic organelles that generate and organize microtubule networks, and thus contribute to a multitude of cellular processes including cell division, polarity and trafficking. For instance, centrosomes drive mitotic spindle assembly whilst cytolytic immune cells depend on centrosomal microtubule arrays for the targeted release of secretory lysosomes. Emerging evidence suggests that centrosomes also act as signalling hubs; due to their membraneless nature, these organelles are able to concentrate (and possibly scaffold) components of signalling pathways from the cytosol. Furthermore, in many cell types, centrosomes template assembly of the primary cilium, an antenna-like cell surface organelle with prominent roles in Hedgehog, Wnt and Notch signalling. To fulfil these complex roles, cells must accurately control centrosome number, composition, structure and function. My group combines cell biology, super-resolution and live microscopy, mouse genetics and proteomics to determine physiological roles and regulation of centrosomes, and to probe the impact of centrosome aberrancies on human pathologies.

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The Battle of the Birds: William Colenso, Walter Buller, Witi Ihimaera, and the materiality of avian fables

May 23, 2024, 1 p.m.

The aim of the seminar is to foster a dynamic and interdisciplinary postcolonial research culture supportive of individual scholarship. Finalists, M.St. and D.Phil. students, lecturers, fellows, scholars from across the university community – all are welcome. If you’d like to appear on the seminar mailing list, please email martha.swift@ell.ox.ac.uk OR hannah.fagan@mansfield.ox.ac.uk

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Introduction to public involvement in research

May 23, 2024, 1 p.m.

Medical Grand Rounds - Week 7: Obstetric Medicine

May 23, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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Hands on science (in-person)

May 23, 2024, 1 p.m.

COURSE DETAILS Uncover the art of facilitating interactive science demonstrations that captivate and educate. Learn the pivotal elements of event design and planning specifically tailored for public engagement activities. By the end of this course, you'll not only have a repertoire of engaging activities at your disposal, but you'll also possess the skills to thoughtfully design, execute, and adapt events that leave lasting impressions. LEARNING OUTCOMES Attending this session will give you the opportunity to:  Use desktop activities to communicate their research.  Explore interactive formats and approaches to engage audiences.  Understand how to tailor an activity to different age groups and settings.  Learn how to facilitate interactive science demonstrations.  Learn the key elements of event design and planning for public engagement activities.

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“My best friend used to look after me and push me round in my chair…but I don’t think really that was appropriate….” Physically disabled children and their sibling and peer carers in England, 1930-1970

May 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

Title TBC

May 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

Probing the heart and soul of cardiac fibrosis using integrated single cell genomics

May 23, 2024, 3 p.m.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. A consistent feature of CVD is fibrosis, which leads to excessive deposition of disorganised extracellular matrix (ECM) due to unrestrained or inappropriate activation of cardiac reparative pathways. In humans, heart failure is the devastating end-stage of fibrotic progression. The notion that pathological fibrosis represents dysregulated tissue repair presents a duality that has implications for how we think about, study, and treat cardiac fibrosis, and the notable failure of anti-fibrotic drug discovery efforts to date reinforces the need to reconsider current models. Single cell genomics has revealed unexpected heterogeneity of cardiac cell populations, and one key hope from this new data is that pro-regenerative and pathological fibrosis become distinguishable at cellular and molecular levels such that they could be targeted selectively. An intermediary goal is to develop high dimensionality single cell atlases and virtual 3D tissues that will drive forward new biology and drug discovery. This requires the generation of integrated reference maps of single cell and spatial transcriptomics data drawn from different studies which harmonise disparate experimental designs, analytical pipelines, and taxonomies. Towards this end, we have generated a comprehensive single cell, time-resolved transcriptome integration map of cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction and used it to interrogate the fibrotic process in diverse CVD states. Key findings include the high similarity between fibroblast identities and dynamics in ischaemic and hypertensive models of cardiomyopathy, timelines for engagement of activated fibroblasts for proliferation and myofibrogenesis, the co-existence of pro- and anti-fibrotic states within myofibroblasts and their descendants, and illustration of the self-limiting nature of fibrosis. We have developed new genetic tools for defining, isolating, and manipulating select fibroblast subsets, and show how integrated data can be used to gain insights into models of run-away fibrosis and augmented cardiac repair. These data invoke a degree of fibroblast plasticity governed by cell state stability thresholds. Preliminary spatial transcriptomics data support key roles for distinct fibroblast spatial microenvironments. Overall, these studies will hopefully contribute to a refined conceptual framework for cardiac fibrosis, allowing better interpretation of CVD progression and new points for intervention through knowledge-based therapeutics.

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OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Seven

May 23, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Seven: Government Ideology, Lockdowns and Vaccines: Evidence from a Global Sample of Countries Between 2020-2023 Presenter: Dr Kerim Can Kavakli, Bocconi University Discussant: Dr Ruth D Carlitz, University of Amsterdam Policy Analysis of the Adoption and Implementation of NPIs to Slow the Spread of COVID-19 in Ghana Presenter: Dr Hanna-Tina Fischer, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin Discussant: Dr Marina Kaneti, National University of Singapore The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 16:00-17:30 BST.

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Is Inequality the Problem? - DSPI Trinity Term Seminar Series 5

May 23, 2024, 4 p.m.

This is a hybrid event Yankelovich Endowed Chair Professor in Sociology Booking is required for people outside of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI). The registration form will be available soon. DSPI members do not need to register

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Intervention before Interventionism

May 23, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

‘The Bookshop of Black Queer Diaspora: Lorraine Hansberry and the Multiplications of Insurgency’

May 23, 2024, 4:45 p.m.

This paper is from Ferguson’s book-in-progress entitled The Bookshop of Black Queer Diaspora. An experimental and conceptual text, the book is comprised of a series of fictional visits to a make-a-believe black queer bookshop and art gallery, made up of actual artifacts that invoke the histories of black queer art and activism, their responses to the ongoing legacies of colonialism and slavery, and the entanglements those legacies and neoliberalism. On this particular visit, the bookshop has acquired the lesbian letters of playwright Lorraine Hansberry and places the letters in conversation with her anti-colonialism.

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Digital Enlightenment Studies: Methods and Approaches (title TBC)

May 23, 2024, 5 p.m.

A lecture series organised by the Voltaire Foundation, in collaboration with DiSc and Linacre College. Join us for a talk from Maciej Eder (Polish Academy of Sciences) - title TBC

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Karl Gunther, University of Florida, “My Simple Opinon”: Lay Belief and the Bible in the Reign of Henry VIII

May 23, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Offered by the Faculties of History and Theology and Religion. For more information, or for the Teams link to join remotely, please contact sarah.apetrei@campion.ox.ac.uk.

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Book Launch: Long Problems - Climate and the Challenge of Governing across Time

May 23, 2024, 6 p.m.

Join Professor Thomas Hale, Professor in Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government, for the launch of his new book Long Problems: Climate Change and the Challenge of Governing across Time, in which he outlines political strategies for tackling climate change and other “long problems” that span generations. Further speakers to be confirmed. Climate change and its consequences unfold over many generations. Past emissions affect our climate today, just as our actions shape the climate of tomorrow, while the effects of global warming will last thousands of years. Yet the priorities of the present dominate our climate policy and the politics surrounding it. Even the social science that attempts to frame the problem does not theorise time effectively. In this pathbreaking book, Thomas Hale examines the politics of climate change and other “long problems.” He shows why we find it hard to act before a problem’s effects are felt, why our future interests carry little weight in current debates, and why our institutions struggle to balance durability and adaptability. With long-term goals in mind, he outlines strategies for tilting the politics and policies of climate change toward better outcomes. Globalisation “widened” political problems across national boundaries and changed our understanding of politics and governance. Hale argues that we must make a similar shift to understand the “lengthening” of problems across time. He describes tools and strategies that can, under certain conditions, allow policymakers to anticipate future needs and risks, make interventions that get ahead of problems, shift time horizons, adapt to changing circumstances, and set forward-looking goals that endure. As the climate changes, politics must, too. Efforts to solve long-term problems—not only climate change but other issues as well, including technology governance and demographic shifts—can also be a catalyst for a broader institutional transformation oriented toward the long term. With Long Problems, Hale offers an essential guide to governing across time. This event is co-hosted with the Oxford Martin School.

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Transforming screening, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

May 24, 2024, 8 a.m.

Hashim is currently Chair of Urology and Head of the Section of Specialty Surgery at Imperial College London which incorporates breast, ENT, head and neck, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, urology and vascular surgery. He heads up the Imperial Prostate group since 2017 when he took up the Chair of Urology having previously been at UCL as a MRC Clinical Research Training Fellow for his PhD, followed by an MRC Clinician Scientist Fellowship which incorporated his position as Clinical Senior Lecturer and then Reader in Urology. He currently holds a Wellcome Senior Research Fellowship (2017 to 2027). His research interests are in health technology assessment with a strong focus on clinical trials that bring innovative and transformative changes to the prostate cancer pathway from screening through to treatment of advanced disease. This has been and is supported by a grant income over the last 10 years of approximately £30M as lead applicant and £12M as co-applicant. He has well over 400 peer reviewed publications. He is active clinically, dealing with benign and malignant diseases of the prostate within the outpatient setting and operatively with minimally invasive approaches. As a result, he has and continues to train and support numerous urologists internationally in the specialised techniques that he has pioneered. Please email Louise King (louise.king@nds.ox.ac.uk) if you would like to attend online.

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Title TBC

May 24, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Volcanic whodunnit: new methods to unravel the source and climate impact of past eruptions

May 24, 2024, noon

The polar ice cores represent our most detailed archive of large magnitude volcanic eruptions. Yet, for the majority of these eruptions we have no idea where the source volcano was located nor whether its ash and sulfur emissions made it to the stratosphere. This information is critical for understanding the climate and societal impacts of past eruptions. Our group at St Andrews is developing a new isotopic and tephra analytical tool kit to extract this key information from volcano ice core archives. Here, I will talk about a particularly fascinating period at the end of the Little Ice Age, 1800–1850 CE, which is the coldest period in the last 500 years and was marked by cluster of mysterious volcanic events.

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Amelia Newsham & 18th century Black British histories

May 24, 2024, 1 p.m.

Race & Resistance is pleased to welcome Dr. Meleisa Ono-George, as part of our Trinity seminar series. Dr. Meleisa will speak to the group about some of her current work, including her forthcoming book My Name is Amelia Newsham: Science, Art and the Making of Race (Viking Books), and her experience navigating the histories of Black individuals in 18th century Britain. After this, the session will open to a Q&A, so come prepared with some questions. Biography: Dr. Meleisa Ono-George is a social-cultural historian of race and gender, with a focus on Black women’s histories in Britain and the Anglo-Caribbean. She is interested in the everyday ways people oppressed within society negotiate and navigate structures of power and inequality, as well as the legacies and politics of writing such histories within contemporary society. Dr Ono-George’s current research focuses on the life of an Afro-Jamaican woman in late eighteenth-century Jamaica and Britain and the archival remnants of her life. She is also currently developing a community-engaged project which looks at the history of Black mothering in Britain and the use of creative storytelling. Both projects draw upon her interest in community-engaged and Caribbean research methodologies. Dr. Ono-George’s first book, My Name is Amelia Newsham: Science, Art and the Making of Race, is forthcoming from Viking Books. ----------- Twitter: race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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Title TBC

May 24, 2024, 1 p.m.

Narrative CVs

May 24, 2024, 1 p.m.

Narrative CVs are being adopted by many funders, nationally and internationally, to give researchers the opportunity to showcase a wider range of skills and experience than is possible in a traditional academic CV; an example is the UKRI Résumé for Research and Innovation (R4RI). Writing a narrative CV requires a different way of thinking about and describing your skills, experience and contributions to research and innovation compared to a traditional CV. Writing your first narrative CV will take some time and effort; you might not be sure about what activities to include, and how to describe their quality, relevance, and your involvement in them. This online presentation will try to demystify and simplify narrative CVs by providing advice, prompts and suggestions for how to write one. This session is intended for researchers who need to write a narrative CV for funding applications and research support staff, from any division, at any career stage. *Speakers* Colleagues from research support and the careers service. *How to Register* If you have a CareerConnect account, please register "here":https://oxford.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=21040&service=Careers%20Service If you do not have a CareerConnect account please register "here":https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=G96VzPWXk0-0uv5ouFLPke7xLB0LNIFKuA055EWF9ZtURUhFSVBMM0o2RkNCMjM4NFBCVkVYVUJGOS4u

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Neuroimmune signalling within and across brain borders regulating synaptic fate in neurodegeneration

May 24, 2024, 1 p.m.

Microglia, brain’s major resident macrophages, are critical contributors of neuronal synapse function and health. One important function of microglia is to detect, and determine, which synapses to eliminate and which ones to spare throughout lifespan, and that this function of microglia goes awry in multiple models of age-related neurodegenerative diseases to mediate synapse loss and dysfunction. However, what the triggers are that regulate microglia-synapse interaction in the adult and diseased brains are unclear. Recent findings, including those from our lab, collectively suggest that the functional cell states of microglia, including the synapse phagocytosing ones, are influenced by local synaptic activity, neighbouring astrocytes, and perivascular macrophages in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. I will highlight these works from our lab and in particular, I will present unpublished data involving cell-cell crosstalk between microglia and immune cells across brain borders that modulate synaptic fate. SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY The Hong lab studies neuro-glia-immune interactions at the synapse. In particular, the lab is interested in how brain’s glial cells including microglia and astrocytes coordinate neuronal synaptic homeostasis, and how this immune-glial crosstalk breaks down in disease, including in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases (Bartels et al., Science 2020, Rueda-Carrasco, Sokolova and Lee et al., EMBO J 2020). The lab also studies neuroimmune signalling on and across brain borders and how they modulate neuronal and synaptic fate (De Schepper et al., Nature Neuroscience 2023). Dr. Soyon Hong received her PhD in Neuroscience in 2012 from Harvard University, after studying with Dr. Dennis Selkoe on amyloid-induced synaptic degeneration (Hong et al., Neuron 2014, Hong et al., Journal of Neuroscience 2011, Li, Hong et al., Neuron 2011). Her post-doctoral work with Dr. Beth Stevens at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School led to the identification of microglia as cellular mediators of synapse loss in Alzheimer models via classical complement cascade (Hong et al., Science 2016). For these works, Soyon received the Junior Faculty Award at international ADPD Kenes (2015), Harvard Lefler Fellowship (2015-2017) and Charles King Trust Fellowship (2016-2018). Soyon started her independent lab at University College London in October 2018 as a UK DRI fellow (2018-2028). She was awarded Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) Neurodegeneration Challenge Network Collaborators Grant (2020-2026), and in 2023 was named the Alzheimer’s Research UK David Hague Early Career Investigator of the Year.

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Title TBC

May 24, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

To be announced

May 24, 2024, 2 p.m.

Title TBC

May 24, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

Book Launch – Reopening the Opening of Japan: Transnational Approaches to Modern Japan and the Wider World

May 24, 2024, 5 p.m.

'Reopening the Opening of Japan: Transnational Approaches to Modern Japan and the Wider World' is the result of the Meiji Restoration sesquicentennial conference held at St Antony’s College in 2019. It rethinks the way in which ‘the Opening of Japan’ constitutes a historical event that connected the archipelago to the wider world. The book draws attention to the historiographical underrepresentation of non-state historical actors and non-imperial encounters in flows of cultural and intellectual life within and beyond Asia in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. It tackles subjects ranging from the worldwide nineteenth century trade in mummified mermaids and a globetrotting Japanese scientist’s study of sexual desire in slime moulds, to the Japanese-Russian intellectual links underpinning threads of anarchism in the work of Akira Kurosawa. These historical studies also revisit many of the broader topics that those learning about Japanese history for the first time will come into contact with, from ideas of revolution, progress, and civilisation, to sizeable shifts in medicine, the arts, politics, religion, industry, and conceptions of nature and humanity. Instead of searching for a specifically “Japanese” experience of these developments, they look at the fundamentally transnational character through the lenses of a diverse range of people. The book sheds light on the lives of pearl divers, sex workers, African American writers, radical doctors, craftsmen, cartoonists, and many more – people whose roles in the ‘Opening of Japan’ have either been downplayed or overlooked entirely. Together, they offer new understandings of Japan’s modernity that emphasise its heterogeneous and polylithic nature. Join us in a conversation about the implications of Reopening the Opening of Japan for future studies of Japan’s global past. Speakers: Sho Konishi is a historian specializing in transnational discourses on knowledge at the University of Oxford. Lewis Bremner (University of Cambridge) is a historian in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. He has previously held posts at Harvard University, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Oxford, and teaches a range of courses on the history of science and technology and the history of East Asia. His interest in the cultural and social dimensions of technology and the interconnections formed by the movement of knowledge is a common thread in his research, and his recent work includes an article in Modern Asian Studies. He is currently writing a book on the history of the magic lantern in Japan. Manimporok (Brown University) studies trans-Asian historical connections with a focus on environment and indigenous universalisms. He does so as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of East Asian Studies and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities at Brown University, which occupies part of the ancestral homelands of the Narragansett. Maani teaches courses on the transnational history of Japan and indigenous histories of the Western Pacific, and is preparing a book manuscript on the Arafura Zone, a historical seascape where non-state actors found autonomy and freedom from modern empires. Chinami Oka is the Tanaka Junior Research Fellow in Japanese Studies at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. She is a cultural and intellectual historian of modern Japan, with a particular focus on peoples and ideas that transcend the nation-state and national boundaries. She teaches the history of religion in modern Japan and the wider world from the early nineteenth century to the present. Her recent publications include an article in The Historical Journal, amongst others. Mateja Kovacic (Hong Kong Baptist University) is Assistant Professor at the Department of Interactive Media, School of Communication. Mateja is a former British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. She is a transdisciplinary researcher of symbiotic entanglements between science, technology, and popular culture in life-and-knowledge-formations. Her most recent work includes the co-edited book Idology in Transcultural Perspective, and an article published in Science as Culture, “Between Animated Cells and Animated Cels: Symbiotic Turn and Animation in Multispecies Life.” Her current book project is on the people’s making of scientific modernity in the Tokugawa period through scientific-popular engagements with weird stuff including mutated morning glory, skeletons, and snowflakes. Joel Littler (University of Oxford) is a DPhil candidate in History as a Daiwa Scholar of Japanese Studies at Pembroke College. He is the convenor of the Oxford Japanese History Workshop. He was formerly a lecturer at Thammasat University and Mahidol University in Thailand, where he taught philosophy. His research centres on the non-colonial intellectual, cultural, and political phenomena that emerged in nineteenth and early twentieth century Japan as a reaction to the perceived failures of the Meiji Ishin to improve ordinary people’s lives. This intersects with his interest in the history of philosophy and religion in Asia’s other non-colonised country, Thailand. His recent publications include: “A Song of Fallen Flowers: Miyazaki Tōten and the making of naniwabushi as a mode of popular dissent in transwar Japan, 1902–1909,” in Modern Asian Studies (2024).

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Archaeology Seminar

May 24, 2024, 5 p.m.

Save the date. More details to be confirmed closer to the time.

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Captain of the Roving Bandits: Spoken drama and the culture of Rural Pacification in Japanese-occupied China

May 24, 2024, 5 p.m.

There is a rich academic literature on the cultural history of modern/spoken drama (huaju) and its links to May 4th nationalism in Republican China. Spoken drama also forms a key part broader discussions around Chinese cultural resistance to the Japanese occupation (1937–45). And as scholars such as Brian DeMare have shown, 'red drama' played a major role in early post-1949 efforts to 'dramatise' the communist revolution in rural regions of China. However, this same form has been largely overlooked in the recent cultural histories of Japanese-occupied China, with emphasis instead being directed towards visual cultures, literature and cinema. In this talk, Professor Taylor will examine the importance of spoken drama to the Reorganised National Government (RNG) of Wang Jingwei by exploring the fate of one particular early-war resistance play – Liukou duizhang (Captain of the Roving Bandits) – which was appropriated by this regime to support the Rural Pacification campaign that it had introduced in 1941. While it is impossible to gauge the 'success' of this play in occupied China, it is clear that the RNG’s propaganda apparatus saw Captain of the Roving Bandits as a vehicle for disseminating its own vision of rural China. The story around the play’s adaptation and production also tells us much about the uses, and limits, of the spoken drama form under the RNG, beyond the theatres of Shanghai. In examining the spoken drama form, Professor Taylor aims to contribute to wider efforts at putting 'culture' back into our understanding of Rural Pacification (a campaign which generated significant amounts of cultural production, yet which continues to be viewed by many scholars as little more than a cynical and violent attempt at counterinsurgency). As Professor Taylor has argued elsewhere, cultural programmes introduced under Rural Pacification drew on aspects of pre-war May 4th and Republican practices. Such programmes also demanded a creative re-working of the contents and messages that such distinctly Chinese cultural products adopted as they steered a path between Japanese censorship and the RNG’s own claims to wartime Chinese patriotism. Jeremy E. Taylor is professor of modern history and head of the History Department at the University of Nottingham. He is the author of over 30 journal articles and/or book chapters on the cultural history of East and Southeast Asia, as well as two monographs, including, most recently, Iconographies of Occupation: Visual Cultures in Wang Jingwei’s China, 1939–1945 (2021). He has also edited four volumes, including, most recently, Chineseness and the Cold War (with Lanjun Xu) (2022). The research he is presenting at this seminar is supported by a generous research grant from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation ('Documenting Wartime Collaboration', RG001-U-22).

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Title TBC

May 27, 2024, 4 p.m.

Chinese Businessmen and the Economic Roots of American Cold War Power, 1938‒1955

May 27, 2024, 5 p.m.

From 1940 to 1945, the United States relied heavily on a steady stream of Chinese tungsten ore, hog bristles, and tung oil in order to power American wartime industry. The flow of Chinese products to the United States was only possible with the efforts of a small handful of Chinese businessmen who served as the linchpins in a vast wartime production network that channelled raw materials from China’s rural hinterland to American factories. The wartime efforts of these businessmen helped lay the foundation for a postwar, Cold War order that was shored up through the exchange of resources for dollars with allied countries throughout Latin America and the Pacific. This talk will focus on one of these businessmen, a man named Li Guoqin or K.C. Li, who was later known as China’s 'Tungsten King', to reveal the powerful role that these businessmen played in shaping the dimensions of American power in East Asia, Latin America, and the wider Cold War world. Judd Kinzley, Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Maddison, is interested in the ways that natural resources define and often limit state power in Chinese border regions. His book, Natural Resources and the New Frontier: Constructing Modern China’s Borderlands (University of Chicago Press, 2018), offers a new material-centered perspective on the development of institutions of state power and authority in China’s far western province of Xinjiang. The book focuses on the efforts of a motley assortment of state and non-state, Chinese and non-Chinese actors to find, exploit, process and transport various natural resources in 20th century Xinjiang, including gold, petroleum, wool and rare minerals, among others. Professor Judd's work offers a unique perspective on the development of Xinjiang’s connections to the modern Chinese state, the roots of ethnic tensions and unrest in the region, and provides a framework for thinking about the integration border regions more generally.

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Get that fellowship (in-person)

May 28, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this session you will understand more about:  What experience and characteristics you need to have to gain a fellowship.  The application process.  How to work with University’s systems and procedures to optimise your application and its chance of success.  You will have an opportunity to practice interviewing/being interviewed for fellowship applications.

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Title TBC

May 28, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

NEAT1 and paraspeckles: nuclear hubs regulating cellular stress responses

May 28, 2024, noon

Lent to Copy”: Art Rentals in the Age of Jane Austen

May 28, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

CSAE Research Workshop Week 6

May 28, 2024, 1 p.m.

Title TBC

May 28, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

The Effects of Climate Change on Labor and Capital Reallocation (with Christoph Albert and Jacopo Ponticelli)

May 28, 2024, 4 p.m.

Climate change is expected to reduce agricultural productivity in developing countries. Classic international trade and geography models predict that the optimal adaptation response is a reallocation of capital and labor from agriculture towards sectors and regions gaining comparative advantage. In this paper, we provide evidence on the effects of recent changes in climate in Brazil to understand to what extent factor market frictions constrain this reallocation process. We document that persistent increases in dryness do not generate capital reallocation but a sharp reduction in credit to all sectors in both drying areas and financially integrated regions. In addition, dryness generates a large reduction in agricultural employment. Workers staying in drying regions reallocate towards manufacturing but climate migrants are allocated to small firms outside of manufacturing in destination regions. The evidence suggests that frictions in the interbank market and spatial labor market frictions constrain the reallocation process from agriculture to manufacturing.

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Sight and Sound in Royal Ceremonial: The Chapel Royal and Cross-Confessional Diplomacy (1558-1625)

May 28, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Navigating the Tightrope of a UN Independent Mandate

May 28, 2024, 4:30 p.m.

The United Nations human rights work is upheld through the efforts of various independent experts, whose pro bono services seek to underscore the impartiality and independence of its human rights oversight. This lecture from Professor Nazila Ghanea explains the role of these experts and examines the balance to be struck in their work, including between independence and relevance, impartiality and robust reporting. This event will take place at Rewley House, Oxford, and will be livestreamed ​for those who wish to watch online. Nazila Ghanea is Professor of International Human Rights Law and Director of the MSc in International Human Rights Law at the University of Oxford (Department for Continuing Education from 2007-2022 and since in the Faculty of Law). Prior to that, she was Senior Lecturer at the University of London, graduate teaching assistant at Keele University and a lecturer in the People’s Republic of China. Though her nearly 30-year career has been rooted in academia, her academic work has regularly contributed to multilateral practice in international human rights law. Since August 2022 she has served as UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief, which is an appointment made by the UN Human Rights Council.

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Neoliberal (and) Feminist Encounters of State-Building in Kosovo

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Addressing a range of contemporary and historical conflicts and daily struggles, this series of talks will explore how violence remains integral to the global political economy, with lasting effects on gendered hierarchies which often extend far beyond immediate war zones.

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Building Resilient Education Systems: Evidence from Large-Scale Randomized Trials in Five Countries

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Education systems need to withstand frequent shocks, including conflict, disease, natural disasters, and climate events, all of which routinely close schools. During these emergencies, alternative models are needed to deliver education. However, rigorous evaluation of effective educational approaches in these settings is challenging and rare, especially across multiple countries. We present results from large-scale randomized trials evaluating the provision of education in emergency settings across five countries: India, Kenya, Nepal, Philippines, and Uganda. We test multiple scalable models of remote instruction for primary school children during COVID-19, which disrupted education for over 1 billion schoolchildren worldwide. Despite heterogeneous contexts, results show that the effectiveness of phone call tutorials can scale across contexts. We find consistently large and robust effect sizes on learning, with average effects of 0.30-0.35 standard deviations. These effects are highly cost-effective, delivering up to four years of high-quality instruction per $100 spent, ranking in the top percentile of education programs and policies. In a subset of trials, we randomized whether the intervention was provided by NGO instructors or government teachers. Results show similar effects, indicating scalability within government systems. These results reveal it is possible to strengthen the resilience of education systems, enabling education provision amidst disruptions, and to deliver cost-effective learning gains across contexts and with governments.

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Economic Diversification and Climate Change in the Middle East

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Countries in the Arabian Gulf occupy an unusual position globally in terms of global climate change. They are not only the world’s top oil producers but are also among the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Recognizing this, most Gulf countries have published ambitious plans to move away their economies from the oil industry. Yet it remains unclear whether such plans will be enacted given how fundamentally they will reshape economic and social life, including potentially upending conservative gender roles in the region. Oil wealth impedes gender equality by giving men better employment opportunities than women (Ross 2009), which contributes to the region’s poor record on women’s rights. Moving away from oil may therefore increase employment opportunities for women and upend traditional gender relations. In this research, we explore how economic diversification shapes support for authoritarian regimes through gendered patterns of economic anxiety. The main question is whether economic diversification threatens men’s identities by disempowering them economically, and thus undermines support for governments and the costly policies that they need to undertake to prevent the worst repercussions of climate change. We are testing our core hypotheses through survey experiments that we currently fielding in Oman and Kuwait with nationally representative samples. Additionally, we are designing randomized behavioral games that test men’s willingness to cooperate with female enumerators as a measure for how economic anxieties shapes support for traditional gender roles and regime support. We plan to run these behavioral games in spring of 2024.

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Economic Diversification and Climate Change in the Middle East

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

The Value of Ratings: Evidence from their Introduction in Securities Markets (with Asaf Bernstein, Carola Frydman)

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Title TBC

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Oxford Comics Network presents: Dr Carol Adlam: author, artist and academic.

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Dr Carol Adlam is Associate Professor in the Nottingham School of Art & Design. She is a writer and artist specialising in narrative and book illustration, and her most recent graphic novel, 'The Russian Detective' (2024) was described by The Observer as 'exquisite', 'so deeply atmospheric and so inordinately beautiful'.

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The Disease of Money: Coins, Traders, and Agency in Twelfth-Century East Asia

May 28, 2024, 5 p.m.

Early Modern Literature Graduate Forum

May 28, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Title TBC

May 29, 2024, 11 a.m.

Fellow's Forum: Disanimality: When Disability, Illness, and Animality Meet

May 29, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

If you are supportive of disability advocacy, should you also be vegan? Should your thoughts on euthanizing a pet be consistent with how you might think about humans in search of assisted suicide? Scholars in disability studies have recently called for greater engagement with animal studies as a field. But complicated questions remain. Disability activists have long been fighting to reclaim the humanity of disabled people, for example, who have historically been constructed in ableist terms as somehow less than human. Should disability and animal activism therefore be linked together? Comparing nonhuman animals to people with terminal illnesses and disabilities is inevitably offensive for some, while others might wonder why there shouldn’t be more solidarity between these movements. The purpose of this talk is to unpack the discomfort these questions can produce, while also suggesting better ways of bringing together disability, illness, and animality, primarily by focusing on the concept of disanimality. Engaging related fields such as posthumanism, biopolitics, animality and illness studies, the larger book project from which this talk is derived explores disanimality through a wide range of contemporary U.S. novels, films, and memoirs. Key examples for this talk will include Don LePan’s dystopian and controversial novel Animals, in which people with disabilities are literally bred and raised for food like animals on factory farms, and Mark Doty’s memoir Dog Years, in which euthanizing companion animals raises questions about the bioethics of assisted dying for humans with terminal illnesses and disabilities.

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CHG Lunchtime Lab Talks: Tzima Group and TBC

May 29, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Tzima Group 12:00-12:30 Speaker(s): TBC Title(s): TBC Group TBC 13:00-13:30 Speaker(s): TBC Title(s): TBC

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Unraveling the Domino Effect: The Impacts of Mass Migration at Origin

May 29, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

We explore the developmental impacts of mass migration on countries of origin, focusing specifically on Venezuela during the significant migrant exodus between 2016 and 2019. By comparing municipalities that had varying numbers of foreign residents before the migration surge, we investigate changes in electoral outcomes, economic growth, and income inequality. Our findings reveal that municipalities with a higher number of foreign residents at the outset - which also experienced greater levels of emigration - witnessed reduced voter turnout and diminished political support for the incumbent opposition. Additionally, we observed notable decreases in night light luminosity, alongside increases in income inequality. Written with Nicolas Cabra (DECRG, World Bank) and Maria Micaela Sviastchi (Princeton University)

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All Souls Fellowship Exam in Politics - Information Session

May 29, 2024, 1 p.m.

Every year, All Souls College seeks to elect 2, occasionally 3, by examination in a range of subjects, including Politics (which includes International Relations and Political Theory.) Examination Fellows are full members of the College's governing body; they receive a stipend or scholarship allowance if eligible for scholarship status, free board and single accommodation in College, and various other benefits. The College normally pays the University fees of Examination Fellows who are studying for degrees at Oxford. Examinations Fellows typically do a doctorate; while most follow an academic career, some pursue careers outside academia in law, finance, journalism and the Civil Service. See https://www.asc.ox.ac.uk/examination-fellowships-general-information for more information, including about past Examinations papers. We will be holding an information session about the Fellowship and the Examination itself for 1st and 2nd students who are currently studying for M.Phil or MSc by Research in DPIR, on Wednesday May 29th, 1-2pm, Seminar Room C, Manor Road. The College is committed to attracting candidates from all backgrounds. The written examinations take place in late September; a small number of candidates (typically 5 or 6) are invited to a viva on the last Saturday of October. The examination is open to those who have recently completed a first degree and, in addition, either did that degree at Oxford or have enrolled as a graduate student at Oxford.

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iSkills: Sources for modern global history

May 29, 2024, 2 p.m.

An introduction to key archival, printed and electronic resources, such as finding aids, bibliographic resources and primary sources for post-1800 global history. The focus will be on non-European history but will draw predominantly on English and European language resources. This session is classroom-based. After the session you will have an understanding of: the different types of material relevant to researching Modern Global History; how to search databases, bibliographies and other online resources; how to search the Bodleian Libraries resource discovery tool for manuscripts and archives; and how to locate relevant archive material elsewhere. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Transformation of sound representations in the auditory system across wakefulness, sleep and anesthesia

May 29, 2024, 2 p.m.

How the brain transforms information from the complex acoustic waves of natural sounds into the sound perceptions that we experience is still a mystery. We have systematically sampled the neural representations of sounds across the auditory system and identified key transformations of the information which we think are necessary to build identifiable auditory objects that can be associated to behavioral responses. This exquisite processing of sound information is profoundly disrupted by anesthesia, as early as in the first relay of the auditory system but remains intact in sleep up to the auditory cortex, the most central structure dedicated to sound processing. Thus, contrary to what is still often assumed, sleep permits the detailed recognition of sounds. These results also highlight the profound difference in perceptual awareness states produced by sleep and anesthesia. In this talk, I will also highlight a novel acousto-optic technology for ultrafast all optical imaging.

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The Meyerstein Lecture in Archaeology 2024: The social worlds of Bronze Age animals

May 29, 2024, 4 p.m.

Although cattle and sheep were central to the everyday lives and wellbeing of Bronze Age communities in northwest Europe, they are strangely lacking from our narratives of the period. After the Neolithic, it seems, archaeologists rarely consider domestic animals to be interesting. However, Bronze Age people clearly thought otherwise, as the careful deposition of complete and partial animal bodies in graves, pits and ditches suggests. The traces of cattle and sheep are present in other ways too, in hoofprints around waterholes and in landscape features like droveways that appear at this time, but we too rarely consider what such evidence can tell us beyond the economic significance of animals and their products. Integrating multispecies and posthumanist perspectives that highlight how living with animals involves intimate interaction and interdependency, we ask how it might be possible to explore the role of cattle and sheep as active participants in Bronze Age social worlds. By reconstructing the intertwining of people and animals in life and death, we can consider how together they generated Bronze Age worlds of work, sociality and meaning.

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Prof Mark Harris | Quantum Fundamentalism and Theological Liberty

May 29, 2024, 5 p.m.

Prof Mark Harris | Quantum Fundamentalism and Theological Liberty Andrew Wiles Building, Lecture Room 2, OX26GG Wed 29th May 2024 5:00PM Prof Mark Harris | Quantum Fundamentalism and Theological Liberty Andreos Idreos Chair in Science and Religion Inaugural Lecture May 29th 2024, 5-6pm. Drinks reception 6-7pm. Mathematical Institute, Andrew Wiles Building, University of Oxford, Lecture Room 2 Professor Mark Harris will deliver the Andreos Idreos Inaugural Lecture on ‘Quantum Fundamentalism and Theological Liberty’. This event is free and open to the public but requires registration in advance (link here). About the Speaker Professor Mark Harris holds the position of the Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion, which is attached to a Professorial Fellowship at Harris Manchester College. As a physicist working in a theological environment, he thinks of himself as a theologian of science, interested in the complex ways that the natural sciences and religious beliefs relate to each other. Professor Harris is the Director of the Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion in the Faculty of Theology and Religion, and he serves as President of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology (ESSSAT). Abstract Quantum Mechanics (QM) is astonishingly successful as a theoretical framework, underpinning countless scientific areas and providing the impetus behind entire industries like telecommunications. Many scientists – not to mention most physicists – suspect that physical reality is wholly quantum at its most fundamental level, even if we perceive little of this in our everyday human experience. This is the viewpoint of ‘quantum fundamentalism’. And yet, the conceptual implications of QM defy common sense, to such an extent that popular culture largely perceives of QM as a source of counter-intuitive weirdness. At the same time, bestselling self-help manuals portray QM as a source of hidden healing power within ourselves, while spiritual readings invoke QM as a bridge to the divine, or as a gateway to ancient wisdom. Scientists often denounce this area as 'quantum quackery', but I will examine its serious side. I will argue that, for quantum fundamentalism to function as a worldview it should inform a sense of human purpose, something which theological analysis is well equipped to supply.

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Smugglers and States: Negotiating the Maghreb at its Margins

May 29, 2024, 5 p.m.

Migration: past, present and future

May 29, 2024, 5 p.m.

Join us at the Oxford launch of Professor Ian Goldin’s latest book - The Shortest History of Migration. Ian will show how migration since the emergence of early humans has shaped human progress, and been at the catalyst for the development of knowledge and civilisations. Migration is seldom totally voluntary, and leads to profound changes in the sending and destination countries, and to the migrants themselves. Professor Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalisation and Development, will provide historical perspectives on current debates regarding the scale, implications and future of migration. This talk is co-hosted by the Oxford Literary Festival This event will be followed by a drinks reception and book sale & signing, all welcome. REGISTRATION To register to attend in person in Oxford: https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/events/migration-past-present-future/ To register to watch live online on Crowdcast click here: https://www.crowdcast.io/c/migration-past-perspectives

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Book launch: The Politics of Crisis-Making: Forced Displacement and Cultures of Assistance in Lebanon

May 29, 2024, 5 p.m.

For details see https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/book-launch-the-politics-of-crisis-making-forced-displacement-and-cultures-of-assistance-in-lebanon

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Doing things with poetry: uses and reuses of poésie fugitive in the long 18th century

May 29, 2024, 5 p.m.

At the origins of raw materials diplomacy. Saltpeter trade in Renaissance Italy

May 29, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Anne McLaren Lecture: a history of the UK's '14-day rule' governing human embryo research

May 29, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

A talk about the fascinating history of the UK’s famous ’14-day rule’ governing human embryo research In the context of current debates over ‘stembryos’, the popular moniker for new human embryo modelling techniques, and the corresponding call for the extension of the 14-day rule, we ask what this case study reveals about ‘the sociology of biological translation’. Sarah Franklin and Emily Jackson, an anthropologist and a legal scholar, argue that Mary Warnock and Anne McLaren, architects of the UK’s pathbreaking regulation of human fertilisation and embryology, devised a unique bio-governance infrastructure that has stood the test of time because it embeds a reciprocal social contract into statutory legislation and that this framework continues to yield valuable lessons for the future. The 14-Day Rule and Embryo Research: A Sociology of Biological Translation by Sarah Franklin and Emily Jackson, with a Foreword by Peter Braude, is published by Taylor and Francis, and scheduled to be launched in May 2024. Professor Sarah Franklin is Chair of Sociology at the University of Cambridge where she directs the Reproductive Sociology Research Group (ReproSoc). Emily Jackson OBE is Professor of Law at the LSE and a former Deputy Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. Professor Jonathan Michie, President of Kellogg College will chair the event. The Anne McLaren Lecture is an annual event at Kellogg. Anne McLaren’s work helped lead to human in vitro fertilisation (IVF). She received many honours for her contributions to science, and became the first-ever woman Officer of the Royal Society, when she was made Foreign Secretary, then Vice-President. She was a Trustee of the Oxford International Biomedical Centre, which commissioned this annual lecture. Refreshments will be served from 5 pm; the seminar will begin at 5.30 pm. Post-event drinks will be served in the Hub at 6.30 pm. This event will be photographed and filmed. If you do not wish to appear in the photographs/footage, please let the photographer/videographer know.

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Putting stories to work (online)

May 30, 2024, 10 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS This highly interactive workshop will be based around an example of writing an explainer or news article for the wider, non-specialist public website (though the lessons can be applied to any communication context). It is highly recommended that you will have already attended the introductory workshop (Telling Stories That Matter), or equivalent introductory workshops on storytelling. Brief reading material will be provided to ensure you are up to date with the fundamentals of storytelling that are the basis of this workshop. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course participants will be able to:  Apply storytelling elements to their research story.  Increase understanding of effective storytelling elements including summary and clarity.

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Dr Ricardo Fernandes - title TBA

May 30, 2024, 11 a.m.

18TH DAVID SMITH LECTURE: Genetics of neurodegeneration: progress towards mechanistic treatments

May 30, 2024, noon

From Fragments to Pharmaceuticals

May 30, 2024, noon

Harren Jhoti co-founded Astex in 1999 and was Chief Scientific Officer until November 2007 when he was appointed Chief Executive Officer. He was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to Cancer Research and Drug Discovery in the King’s New Year Honours in 2023. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2018, the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2016, and of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2015. In January 2018 he was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the UK BioIndustry Association (BIA). He received the Prous Institute-Overton and Meyer Award for New Technologies in Drug Discovery from the European Federation for Medicinal Chemistry in 2012 and was also named by the Royal Society of Chemistry as “Chemistry World Entrepreneur of the Year” for 2007. In September 2023, Dr. Jhoti won Business Person of the Year at the 21st annual Asian Achievers Awards. He has published widely including in leading journals such as Nature and Science, and has also been featured in TIME magazine after being named by the World Economic Forum a Technology Pioneer in 2005. He has served on the board of the BIA, the UK BioIndustry Association and currently consults for life science venture capital firms. Before founding Astex in 1999, he was head of Structural Biology and Bioinformatics at GlaxoWellcome in the United Kingdom (1991-1999). Prior to Glaxo, Dr. Jhoti was a post-doctoral scientist at Oxford University. He received a B.Sc. (Hons) in Biochemistry in 1985 and a Ph.D. in Protein Crystallography from the University of London in 1989.

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Medical Grand Rounds - Week 8: Sports, Exrercise and Rehabilitation Medicine

May 30, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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"God is an Equal Opportunities Employer - Pity about the Church": Humour and the Campaign for Women's Ordination in the Church of England, 1978-1994

May 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

Franciscan Spirituality, Transmutation, and the Antichrist: John of Rupescissa’s Alchemical Thought and Practices

May 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

Title TBC

May 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

Literature and Mental Health: Reading Group Session 3

May 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

Webpage: english.web.ox.ac.uk/reading-group-literature-and-mental-health Reading list: drive.google.com/drive/folders/1u3IaqwXUPyeOKKQ0oznFdeMODLlTw35g?usp=sharing Please copy and paste the links into a different tab in case they do not open here. Thank you.

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Repeat Expansions Instigate Cellular Supply Chain Issues in the Nucleus and Cytoplasm

May 30, 2024, 2 p.m.

Social Justice and Health Equity

May 30, 2024, 3 p.m.

TBC Booking is required for people outside of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI). The registration form will be available soon. DSPI members do not need to register.

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OxCGRT Seminar Series: Session Eight

May 30, 2024, 4 p.m.

Session Eight: Securitisation Versus Sovereignty? Multi-level Governance, Scientific Objectivation, and the Discourses of the Canadian and American Heads of State During the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic Presenter: Marjolaine Lamontagne, McGill University Discussant: Professor Frank Schimmelfennig, ETH Zürich COVID-19 Lessons for Social Resilience? Notes from Southeast Asia Presenter: Dr Marina Kaneti, National University of Singapore and Simren Sekhon Discussant: Dr Hanna-Tina Fischer, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin The Oxford Covid-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT) is a project that collected information on policy measures to tackle COVID-19 over the years 2020, 2021, and 2022. Although a substantial body of scientific research on COVID-19 government responses has already been published, many research questions remain unanswered, and the OxCGRT team is continuing research into the impacts and determinants of pandemic policy and working with partners to devise new approaches to data collection that can be deployed quickly in the face of future pandemics or global emergencies. The OxCGRT Seminar Series is an innovative platform for scholars working on COVID-19 responses, offering an opportunity to present and discuss their ongoing research work as well as to connect with the broader research community. The series will run online every Thursday from 11 April to 30 May at 4:00-5:30 pm BST.

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Sophie Aldred, University of Oxford, Reading and Religion in the Civil wars: Lord Robartes and the Library at Lanhydrock

May 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Sophie Aldred, University of Oxford Reading and Religion in the Civil wars: Lord Robartes and the Library at Lanhydrock

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AI in Computer Vision

May 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

Cybersecurity, Ethics and Collective Responsibility

May 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

This talk introduces a new book by Seumas Miller and Terry Bossomaier: Cybersecurity, Ethics and Collective Responsibility (Oxford University Press, 2024). The advent of the Internet, exponential growth in computing power, and rapid developments in artificial intelligence have raised numerous cybersecurity-related ethical questions in various domains. The dual use character of cybertechnology-that it can be used to provide great benefits to humankind but can also do great harm-means that business (data security, data ownership and privacy), public communication (disinformation and computational propaganda), health (privacy, ransomware attacks), law enforcement (data security, predictive policing) and interstate conflict (cyberwar, autonomous weapons) are of vital interest to cybersecurity ethics. A central theoretical and practical problem addressed in this book and in this talk is that of our collective responsibility for the collective good of cybersecurity.

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Scholars' Library: Joseph Nye on 'A Life in the American Century'

May 30, 2024, 5 p.m.

For our May Scholars’ Library event, Joseph Nye (New Jersey & Exeter 1958) will discuss his new memoir A Life in the American Century. In conversation with fellow Scholar Ziyi Wang (China & Queen's 2021), amongst other topics, Joseph will talk about power and political leadership, his personal journey between Harvard and Washington, life in Oxford in the late 50's, and how US academia and government have changed over the years. For the past eight decades, we have lived in "the American Century" - a period during which the US has enjoyed unrivalled power - be it political, economic or military - on the global stage. Born on the cusp of this new era, Joseph S. Nye Jr. has spent a lifetime illuminating our understanding of the changing contours of America power and world affairs. His many books on the nature of power and political leadership have rightly earned him his reputation as one of the most influential international relations scholars in the world today. In this deeply personal book, Joseph Nye shares his own journey living through the American century. From his early years growing up on a farm in rural New Jersey to his time in the State Department, Pentagon and Intelligence Community during the Carter and Clinton administrations where he witnessed American power up close, shaping policy on key issues such as nuclear proliferation and East Asian security. After 9/11 drew the US into wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Nye remained an astute observer and critic of the Bush, Obama and Trump presidencies. Today American primacy may be changing, but he concludes with a faint ray of guarded optimism about the future of his country in a richer but riskier world. Part of the Lifelong Fellowship portfolio, The Scholars’ Library is a monthly book talk series, where Rhodes alumni can come together to present, discover and debate their literary works. If you’re interested in getting involved, please reach out to Georgie Thurston at mailto:alumni@rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk You can read more about this event and the speaker here: https://bit.ly/ALifeInTheAmericanCentury

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Challenging Expectations: What Women Have to Face in Academia

May 30, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

In the third lecture in this series, *Junior Professor Amrei Bahr* will explore the topic of ‘Challenging Expectations: What Women Have to Face in Academia.’ The ‘Uncovering Women’s History’ lecture series aims to explore women’s empowerment and the contribution of women and other marginalised minorities across history.

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Oxford Centre for Intellectual History Graduate Conference

May 31, 2024, 8:45 a.m.

The Oxford Centre for Intellectual History Graduate Conference will take place on Friday 31 May 2024, 9.00-16.00 UKT https://intellectualhistory.web.ox.ac.uk/event/oxford-centre-for-intellectual-history-graduate-conference The conference will be run as a hybrid event, with the opportunity for all attendees to join us online or in person at the University of Oxford. This event is an opportunity for graduate students to present their research and network with similar researchers at Oxford and other institutions. This year's theme is Methodology in Intellectual History, with a focus on the following topics: 1. Presentism in Intellectual History: In recent years, intellectual historians have increasingly engaged in ‘presentism’, which can refer to both the inclination to study the recent past (as opposed to earlier periods) and the tendency to interpret the past (however distant) in terms of the present. This has proven contentious. Some scholars have claimed that presentism does not merely risk anachronistic interpretations of the past; it also threatens the identity of intellectual history by undermining its distinctive concern with exploring unfamiliar subject-matter. Are these worries justified? We invite papers that consider the issue of presentism in intellectual history. 2. Intellectual History, Philosophy and Literature: Twentieth century methodological debates and the ‘linguistic turn’ of the 1960s oversaw a gradual shift within intellectual history, from the perception of ideas as universal concepts insulated from change and historical time, to linguistic representations grounded within particular, temporally-bound contexts. Insofar as the intellectual historian seeks to understand the movement of concepts and languages across time, where do we draw the line between intellectual history and philosophy? If all histories are narratives, to what extent should we consider historical reconstruction a creative or poetic practice? We invite reflections on the status of language and methods of interpreting historical consciousness within the humanities—particularly on the relationship between intellectual history, philosophy and/or literature. 3. Global Intellectual History (GIH): What kind of eurocentrism does/can GIH challenge, and what kind of methodology would accomplish this goal? Which historical actors matter in GIH, and why? How ought we account for exchanges (of ideas, books, people, etc.) that transcended borders and the power relations and practices of translation that come with them? Furthermore, does history guided by the term "global" risk reimposing the narrativised 'inevitability' of Western modernity on to other parts of the world? And does globality come at the expense of particular spatio-temporal contexts? We welcome papers that advance or critically engage with existing methodologies in GIH, including transnational and planetary intellectual history. Our keynote speaker for this event will be Faisal Devji, Professor of Indian History at the University of Oxford, St. Antony's College. The deadline for abstract submissions is 28 April, 2024. Please submit via this form: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=G96VzPWXk0-0uv5ouFLPkZ2HVAzisodDpKxd5LO9WlpUMFMwRUs2NUFZOEZVSEwzUjlLRzhONjFHSi4u If you are interested in attending the conference, please complete this form: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=G96VzPWXk0-0uv5ouFLPkZ2HVAzisodDpKxd5LO9WlpUODcxMko4UEtTTUpYMk9JQkhWVkc0SFRPUy4u

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Oxford Centre for Intellectual History Graduate Conference (Hybrid event)

May 31, 2024, 8:45 a.m.

The conference will be run as a hybrid event, with the opportunity for all attendees to join us online or in person at the University of Oxford. This event is an opportunity for graduate students to present their research and network with similar researchers at Oxford and other institutions. This year’s theme is *Methodology in Intellectual History*, with a focus on the following topics (intellectualhistory.web.ox.ac.uk/event/oxford-centre-for-intellectual-history-graduate-conference): 1. *Presentism in Intellectual History*: In recent years, intellectual historians have increasingly engaged in ‘presentism’, which can refer to both the inclination to study the recent past (as opposed to earlier periods) and the tendency to interpret the past (however distant) in terms of the present. This has proven contentious. Some scholars have claimed that presentism does not merely risk anachronistic interpretations of the past; it also threatens the identity of intellectual history by undermining its distinctive concern with exploring unfamiliar subject-matter. Are these worries justified? We invite papers that consider the issue of presentism in intellectual history. 2. *Intellectual History, Philosophy and Literature*: Twentieth century methodological debates and the ‘linguistic turn’ of the 1960s oversaw a gradual shift within intellectual history, from the perception of ideas as universal concepts insulated from change and historical time, to linguistic representations grounded within particular, temporally-bound contexts. Insofar as the intellectual historian seeks to understand the movement of concepts and languages across time, where do we draw the line between intellectual history and philosophy? If all histories are narratives, to what extent should we consider historical reconstruction a creative or poetic practice? We invite reflections on the status of language and methods of interpreting historical consciousness within the humanities—particularly on the relationship between intellectual history, philosophy and/or literature. 3. *Global Intellectual History (GIH)*: What kind of eurocentrism does/can GIH challenge, and what kind of methodology would accomplish this goal? Which historical actors matter in GIH, and why? How ought we account for exchanges (of ideas, books, people, etc.) that transcended borders and the power relations and practices of translation that come with them? Furthermore, does history guided by the term “global” risk reimposing the narrativised ‘inevitability’ of Western modernity on to other parts of the world? And does globality come at the expense of particular spatio-temporal contexts? We welcome papers that advance or critically engage with existing methodologies in GIH, including transnational and planetary intellectual history. Our keynote speaker for this event will be *Faisal Devji*, Professor of Indian History at the University of Oxford, St. Antony’s College. *The deadline for abstract submissions is 28 April, 2024*. Please submit via this form: forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=G96VzPWXk0-0uv5ouFLPkZ2HVAzisodDpKxd5LO9WlpUMFMwRUs2NUFZOEZVSEwzUjlLRzhONjFHSi4u If you are interested in attending the conference, please complete this form: forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=G96VzPWXk0-0uv5ouFLPkZ2HVAzisodDpKxd5LO9WlpUODcxMko4UEtTTUpYMk9JQkhWVkc0SFRPUy4u

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Title TBC

May 31, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Zircon and Plagioclase Chronicles of Volcano-Magmatic Evolution

May 31, 2024, noon

Unraveling dynamics of volcano-magmatic systems remains a great challenge due to absence of direct observations of magma formation, storage or eruptions. Recent advances in analyzing minerals like zircon or plagioclase offer a window into these hidden processes. Zircon, a remarkably resistant mineral, can grow for many thousands of years within slowly cooling magma chambers. Despite this slow crystallization, these crystals retain signatures of disequilibrium trace element partitioning (e.g., Hf, Y, U, Th) and Zr isotopic fractionation due to diffusion. Simulation of these processes transforms zircon crystals to thermometers and clocks, recording the thermal evolution of individual magma parcels. Plagioclase, another key witness, offers insights into pre-eruptive magma ascent and storage conditions. Core-to-rim variations in Anorthite content, Sr, and Ba concentrations reflect changes in pressure and temperature providing valuable clues about the complex dynamics leading up to an eruption.

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On Palestine - Why Solidarity Matters

May 31, 2024, 1 p.m.

Join us for an important conversation around Palestine. Race & Resistance have invited two representatives from local organisations to come and speak about their crucial work, in campaigning, lobbying, and mobilising for Palestine and its people. Both representatives will deliver a short talk about the current situation in Gaza and the West Bank, share information about the work of their organisations, and how individuals can support/get involved. Caroline Raine (she/her), representative from the Oxford Palestine Solidarity Campaign (OPSC). Bio: I am of British Jewish heritage and was one of the founding members of Oxford Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) more than 20 years ago. I am currently acting chair of the branch. I have also served on national PSC panels. I have visited Palestine three times and each time witnessed the impact of the brutal occupation on its people. PSC is the biggest organisation in the UK and Europe dedicated to securing Palestinian human rights. It brings together people from all walks of life who work together for peace, equality, and justice and against racism, occupation, and colonisation. Nikki Marriott (she/her), representative from the Oxford Ramallah Friendship Association (ORFA). Bio: I am secretary of the Oxford Ramallah Friendship Association (ORFA) which has been linking with Ramallah for over 20 years and became a charity in 2014. We mainly focus our link on: the non-aligned Al Amari Refugee Camp's Women's Program Centre and with our Trade Union contacts. We have arranged and accompanied regular group visits to Ramallah/Palestine and raised funds to organise visits from Ramallah/Palestine to Oxford. In 2019, with the support and work of councillors, Oxford City Council successfully Twinned with Ramallah. Very broadly our aims are, with our contacts and visitors, to raise awareness of the impact of living under colonial settler occupation and we hope to reduce the sense of isolation that comes from life under military occupation in the West Bank. ----- Twitter: race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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Title TBC

May 31, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Cytoneme-mediated morphogenesis

May 31, 2024, 2 p.m.

Morphogen protein gradients play an essential role in the spatial regulation of patterning during embryonic development. The most commonly accepted mechanism of protein gradient formation involves the diffusion and degradation of morphogens from a localized source. Recently, an alternative mechanism has been proposed, which is based on cell-to-cell transport via thin, actin-rich cellular extensions known as cytonemes. It has been hypothesized that cytonemes find their targets via a random search process based on alternating periods of retraction and growth, perhaps mediated by some chemoattractant. This is an actin-based analog of the search-and-capture model of microtubules of the mitotic spindle searching for cytochrome binding sites (kinetochores) prior to separation of cytochrome pairs. In this talk, we introduce a search-and-capture model of cytoneme-based morphogenesis, in which nucleating cytonemes from a source cell dynamically grow and shrink until making contact with a target cell and delivering a burst of morphogen. We model the latter as a one-dimensional search process with stochastic resetting, finite returns times and refractory periods. We use a renewal method to calculate the splitting probabilities and conditional mean first passage times (MFPTs) for the cytoneme to be captured by a given target cell. We show how multiple rounds of search-and-capture, morphogen delivery, cytoneme retraction and nucleation events lead to the formation of a morphogen gradient. We proceed by formulating the morphogen bursting model as a queuing process, analogous to the study of translational bursting in gene networks. We end by briefly discussing current work on a model of cytoneme-mediated within-host viral spread.

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TBC

May 31, 2024, 2 p.m.

TBC

May 31, 2024, 2 p.m.

The Core of Bayesian Persuasion

May 31, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

An analyst observes the frequency with which an agent takes actions, but not the frequency with which she takes actions conditional on a payoff relevant state. In this setting, we ask when the analyst can rationalize the agent's choices as the outcome of the agent learning something about the state before taking action. Our characterization marries the obedience approach in information design (Bergemann and Morris, 2016) and the belief approach in Bayesian persuasion (Kamenica and Gentzkow, 2011) relying on a theorem by Strassen (1965) and Hall's marriage theorem. We apply our results to ring-network games and to identify conditions under which a data set is consistent with a public information structure in first-order Bayesian persuasion games.

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Efficient Estimation with Non-Random Exposure to Exogenous Shocks

May 31, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

We characterize the instruments which optimally combine a set of exogenous shocks with some non-random measures of shock exposure, building on the framework of Borusyak and Hull (2023). Our characterization has implications for treatments capturing spillovers in social and transportation networks, simulated instruments for policy eligibility, and shift-share instruments. We show how significantly more precise estimates of Medicaid take-up and crowd-out effects can be obtained by combining policy expansion shocks with non-random variation in Medicaid eligibility.

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The Willy Wonka Ticket: teaching values in elite education

May 31, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Simon Woolley, Baron Woolley of Woodford, former CEO of Operation Black Vote, Member of the House of Lords, and Principal of Homerton College Cambridge, discusses with Mansfield Principal Helen Mountfield KC the purpose and value of elite higher education, and the values it should inculcate.

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HAPP ONE-DAY CONFERENCE: The Philosophy of Cosmology

June 1, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

A primeval desire to understand the cosmos has existed since antiquity and some of the mysteries of the early Universe and its evolution have been revealed as scientific knowledge and philosophical understanding have developed over the millennia. This conference will consider the profound questions that lie at the intersection of cosmology, metaphysics and epistemology - it will seek to scrutinise the origins of the Universe and theories on the cosmos and its evolution as well as the methodologies and models used to comprehend these. *Please see website for booking details: https://www.stx.ox.ac.uk/event/happ-one-day-conference-the-philosophy-of-cosmology*

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Children’s perspective on social movements in Finland, 1959-1989

June 3, 2024, 11 a.m.

Link to join via Microsoft Teams: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZWNjNjY1YTItMGE1NC00YmI1LWE5MjgtOWRiMWRmZjRmOGU1%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22cc95de1b-97f5-4f93-b4ba-fe68b852cf91%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%228a90033c-fe26-41a7-b094-f077e6448461%22%7d

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Dr Xiang Dong Fu - title TBA

June 3, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

Do children perform better in religious schools?

June 3, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

Religious schools enjoy a high academic reputation among parents in many societies. Previous studies that assessed the effect of religious schools mostly focused on Catholic schools and were conducted in countries where religious schools are private or where they charge fees and set admission criteria. As a result, the effect of religious schooling could not be separated from the effect of private schooling. We contribute to the literature by studying the effect of six most prominent religious school denominations in the Netherlands, a country in which both public and religious schools have been publicly funded since 1917, schooling is free of charge and admission is independent of the child’s religious or ideological character. We use Dutch data that include the entire population of children born between 1999 and 2007. Combining postcode fixed effects models with treatment effect bounds, we find that children in religious schools outperform children in public schools on a high-stakes standardized test in primary education. The benefits of primary religious schooling were largest for children in Orthodox Protestant, Islamic and Hindu schools, which mostly attract children from a disadvantaged socioeconomic background. However, the influence of religious schooling fades out by the end of secondary education. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82124879003?pwd=M2lrWjZkNjZ4NC9FdWJFSFhmZ3VLQT09

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Exploiting electronic health records to improve infection management

June 3, 2024, 1 p.m.

Title TBC

June 3, 2024, 2 p.m.

A Climate of State-Building in Equatorial Eastern Africa c.1840-1875

June 3, 2024, 3 p.m.

How have North Koreans settled in South Korea? A roundtable discussion

June 3, 2024, 3 p.m.

At this roundatble, we delve into the satisfaction levels of North Korean defectors living in South Korea, the reasons behind it, its impact on North Korea, and the role of the international community regarding human rights violations in North Korea. The speakers will use novel statistical data collected from the Hana Foundation's annual representative surveys of North Koreans living in South Korea. Email Seunghoon Chae (seunghoon.chae@politics.ox.ac.uk) if you would like to join further discussions over dinner with the speakers. Please note that there is limited availability for dinner.

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The Soundscapes of Herb Women: Mapping Community Healthcare in Early Modern London

June 3, 2024, 4 p.m.

London's early modern herb women are an interesting footnote to the groundbreaking work done over the past few decades to uncover the lives of the women who predominated over the premodern city's medical industry. This is because herb women -- illiterate urban dwellers of the poorest sort -- mark the boundaries of early modern medicine, the limits of what (and who) we can see about community care in this era. They exist below the threshold of our visibility despite their crucial role in the seventeenth-century healthcare market. Since there is such a paucity of official records about them, this talk uses a different metric of observation to move away from an analysis based on historical lines of sight and towards a synesthetic reading of Londoners' sensory experience of them in imaginative literature as well as passing descriptions in civic and royal documents. Broadening our lens to accommodate contemporary descriptions of the soundscapes they created within the common spaces of the city allows for a richer understanding of the ways in which the medical and the cultural, the pragmatic and the affective, and the historical and the literary blended together in the streets of early modern London. *Kat Lecky* is the Surtz Professor in English at Loyola University Chicago. Her research explores what made knowledge common in the early modern period. Her first book, Pocket Maps and Public Poetry in Renaissance England (Oxford UP, 2019), shows the geographical imaginary fuelling the everyday practices of building the English commonwealth. Her second book project, England’s Weedy Renaissance, demonstrates how authors of all stripes turned to uncultivated plants to fashion a native English character. She has also published essays on naturalization, the early modern politics of universal healthcare, and vegetable virtue ethics. Her work has earned fellowships from the ACLS and the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute for Research in the Humanities, the Renaissance Society of America, and the Folger Shakespeare, Huntington, and Newberry Libraries.

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Title TBC

June 3, 2024, 4:05 p.m.

Public Seminar Series: Rethinking scientific literacy in an era of pandemics, conspiracies and climate emergencies

June 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

Recent events have called into question the adequacy of the science education offered in schools in the UK and elsewhere. The evidence suggests that, despite studying science at primary and secondary school, significant numbers of the public seem unfamiliar with some basic but important facts. A related issue is that trust in science and scientists is not as strong as might be expected in a developed country. Rather than carry on as though there is not really a problem, Justin Dillon will argue that we need to rethink what and how we teach science in schools. We also need to value what museums, science centres, botanic gardens, etc., can do to help. Finally, we need to examine what science and environmental education offer in terms of addressing the wicked problems facing society. In-person booking link: https://forms.office.com/e/JrDdaDT9Ma Zoom booking link: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_lGb2k0X0SISeKInC0kwFRw

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Screening the documentary film “Antoine the Fortunate” at Oxford

June 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

Sultan Azlan Shah Lecture: "Can International Law make a Difference in Time of War?"

June 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

Safeguarding in times of crisis. The compensation of the former Bavarian royal family after 1918

June 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

In November 1918, the monarchy of Bavaria was abolished after a successful democratic revolution. Immediately afterwards, the question was raised on how to deal with the House of Wittelsbach in the future and whether and if so, what financial compensation they could expect. The property disputes between the representatives of the Free State of Bavaria and the former royal family lasted from 1919 until 1923. Finally, in 1923, an agreement and a law provided the legal basis for the compensation of the Wittelsbachs in the form of a permanent public foundation, the Wittelsbach Compensation Fund (Germ. Wittelsbacher Ausgleichsfonds), which was to guarantee the financial future of the entitled family members. My talk will focus on the creation of this fund against the backdrop of the financial and political crises in the Weimar Republic.

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The Rise and Fall of Confederate Monuments: Memory and the American Civil War

June 3, 2024, 5 p.m.

In the summer of 2020 following the brutal police murder of George Floyd, debates about the place of the Confederate symbols erupted across the US. Calls for Confederate monuments to be razed followed as did cries for street names or schools bearing Confederate names to be changed. Since that summer more than 120 Confederate monuments had been removed, including those in Charlottesville, home of the University of Virginia. But why does the American Civil War continue to elicit such reactions – some intensely violent – more than a century and a half after its close? In this lecture, Caroline Janney will examine the long history of Civil War memory – of the efforts by Union and Confederate veterans alongside their respective civilians to both remember and forget aspects of the war in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Caroline E. Janney is the John L. Nau III Professor of the American Civil War and Director of the John L. Nau Center for Civil War History at the University of Virginia. She is the past president of the Society of Civil War Historians and a series editor for the University of North Carolina Press’s Civil War America series. She has published eight books, including Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation (2013) and Ends of War: The Unfinished Fight of Lee’s Army after Appomattox (2021), winner of the 2022 Lincoln Prize.

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Vernon Lee’s Critical Irrealism [on Hauntings]

June 3, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

Book Launch: The States of the Earth: An Ecological and Racial History of Secularization

June 3, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

While industrial states competed to colonize Asia and Africa in the nineteenth century, conversion to Christianity was replaced by a civilizing mission. This new secular impetus strode hand in hand with racial capitalism in the age of empires: a terrestrial paradise was to be achieved through accumulation and the ravaging of nature. Far from a defence of religion, The States of the Earth argues that phenomena such as evangelism and political Islam are best understood as products of empire and secularization. In a world where material technology was considered divine, religious and secular forces both tried to achieve Heaven on Earth by destroying Earth itself.

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Completing Your DPhil (in-person)

June 4, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

COURSE DETAILS The session will cover:  What makes a good DPhil  Planning to write up your DPhil – structure, content and what makes good writing  What the viva will explore  What the examiners are asked to consider  FAQs and Q&A LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the session participants will be able to:  Engage productively with the final stages of the DPhil.  Apply a range of time management techniques.  Identify and apply the characteristics of effective writing.  Apply effective structure to the thesis.  Understand what is required in the viva.  Take opportunities to raise and discuss concerns.

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Placebo Studies & the Replication Crisis

June 4, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

A growing body of cross-cultural survey research shows high percentages of clinicians’ report using placebos in clinical settings. One motivation for clinicians using placebos is to help patients by capitalising on the placebo effect’s reported health benefits. This is not surprising, given that placebo studies are burgeoning, with increasing calls by researchers to ethically harness placebo effects among patients, and with widespread media attention on the purported potency of these effects. These calls, and media reportage, propose placebos/placebo effects that offer clinically significant benefits to patients. In this talk, I argue many findings in this highly cited and ‘hot’ field have not been independently replicated. My goal is to motivate both increased awareness of replication issues and to help pave the way for advances in scientific research in the field of placebo studies to better inform ethical evidence-based practice. I argue that only by developing a rigorous evidence base can we better understand how it at all, placebos/placebo effects can be harnessed in clinical settings. https://zoom.us/j/95199401096?pwd=ancrZ0U1b0RNVmlKL0tQdTQ5SzhLUT09 Meeting ID: 951 9940 1096 Passcode: 937384

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Digital Scholarship coffee morning

June 4, 2024, 10:30 a.m.

Join us for a digital scholarship coffee gathering – tea and coffee will be provided. There will be a lightning talk from a researcher in digital scholarship on their work, whether it’s a new project, a tool or something they want to showcase. These are a new type of event for us, so if you’d like to attend, be involved in a future session, or find out more please email digitalscholarship@humanities.ox.ac.uk These will be held in the Visiting Scholars Centre, so to attend you’ll need to bring your Bodleian Card and to leave your bags in the lockers – this event is only open to University staff and students.

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Open scholarship: playing in the open: getting familiar with creative commons licences

June 4, 2024, 11:30 a.m.

Create content for your teaching or research with greater confidence by attending our session on Creative Commons (CC) licences. Learn how they work, how they interact with copyright and how to use them to best effect. The session will make special reference to images but is applicable to all media, including written works. The workshop is classroom-based. In this playful, interactive face-to-face session we will cover: what Creative Commons Licences are; where to find Creative Commons material; how to apply Creative Commons to your own work; how to reuse Creative Commons materials; and we’ll finish the session with a Creative Commons card game. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Title tbc

June 4, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'Findings & Learning from the national STADIA (Standardised Diagnostic Assessments in CAMHS) study – a multi-Centre Randomised Controlled Trial'

June 4, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

The STADIA Trial is investigating whether the use of the Development and Wellbeing Assessment (DAWBA) questionnaire helps support the referral and assessment processes within the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and helps clinicians identify emotional disorders in children and young people. Find out more: https://www.nctu.ac.uk/our-research/randomised-trials/current-studies/stadia.aspx This is a hyrbid event, held in the Department of Psychiatry’s Seminar Room and online (Zoom). Please email shona.oleary@psych.ox.ac.uk to request the Zoom link.

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Title TBC

June 4, 2024, 1 p.m.

Hybrid Oxford Stroke Seminar - Thrombolysis Review

June 4, 2024, 1 p.m.

CSAE Research Workshop Week 7

June 4, 2024, 1 p.m.

Medical Ethics, Law, and Humanities

June 4, 2024, 1 p.m.

The Family and Medical Law Research Group and Medical Humanities are organising a monthly lunch for academics, researchers, and graduate students who are working in the broad area of medical ethics, law, and humanities. Whichever discipline you're researching in, you are very welcome to join us for an informal lunchtime gathering at Radcliffe Humanities, TORCH on the first Tuesday of each month. A simple sandwich lunch will be provided, and it will be a casual space for everyone to share ideas, collaborate, or just catch up. We look forward to seeing many of you there! Any questions, please get in touch with Urania Chiu at urania.chiu@law.ox.ac.uk.

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Title TBC

June 4, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

On the perception of ‘now’: intriguing evidence from confabulating patients

June 4, 2024, 2 p.m.

iSkills: Sources for U.S. History

June 4, 2024, 2 p.m.

An online introduction to primary sources for the study of American history, from the colonial period to the 20th century. The session will provide an overview of the different kinds of information sources (early printed books, newspapers, databases and official records), and guidance on locating material for research. Collections highlighted include physical materials available in Oxford, Bodleian databases and other online resources. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Ethox Seminar - Neuroethics of lumbar punctures (aka ‘spinal taps’) for psychiatric indications (provisional title)

June 4, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

Abstract To follow This will be a hybrid seminar in the Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, and on Zoom. Zoom registration https://medsci.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYkdeirrz4jHNFEqFttmTG5FWHYUJewVxjS

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Learning representations for image-based profiling of perturbations

June 4, 2024, 3 p.m.

Measuring the phenotypic effect of treatments on cells through imaging assays is an efficient and powerful way of studying cell biology, and requires computational methods for transforming images into quantitative data. Here, we present an improved strategy for learning representations of treatment effects from high-throughput imaging, following a causal interpretation. We use weakly supervised learning for modeling associations between images and treatments, and show that it encodes both confounding factors and phenotypic features in the learned representation. To facilitate their separation, we constructed a large training dataset with images from five different studies to maximize experimental diversity, following insights from our causal analysis. Training a model with this dataset successfully improves downstream performance, and produces a reusable convolutional network for image-based profiling, which we call Cell Painting CNN. We evaluated our strategy on three publicly available Cell Painting datasets, and observed that the Cell Painting CNN improves performance in downstream analysis up to 30% with respect to classical features, while also being more computationally efficient.

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Title TBC

June 4, 2024, 4 p.m.

Reckoning with Race in Early Modern London

June 4, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

Women and Democratic Change: The Longest Global Revolution

June 4, 2024, 5 p.m.

Addressing a range of contemporary and historical conflicts and daily struggles, this series of talks will explore how violence remains integral to the global political economy, with lasting effects on gendered hierarchies which often extend far beyond immediate war zones.

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Title TBC

June 4, 2024, 5 p.m.

Democracy of the last man: The politics of demographic imagination

June 4, 2024, 5 p.m.

In the wake of the Cold war Francis Fukuyama portrayed the “last man” as free but devoid of ambitions, polite but unheroic, somebody castrated by the satisfaction of his desires but a very agreeable fellow. He is married to democracy, but we suspect no more in love with it. The “last man” of this lecture is a different one. He has arrived when history has returned. He is anxious and mistrustful. He is overtaken by demographic anxiety. He thinks he lives in the dregs of time. He tends to believe that the next elections should be the last elections. Why is he so terrified. And where he comes from? And what can we expect from him? And how will he change our idea of democracy?

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Oxford Comics Network presents: Emmy Waldman: 'Filial Lines: Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, and Comics Form'

June 4, 2024, 5 p.m.

Emmy Waldman PhD is Visiting Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Literature at Virginia Tech. Her work examines the links between Alison Bechdel and Art Spiegelman's innovative approaches to comic form and their lineage, both family and artistic/literary. A fascinating subject - please join us.

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Recombinant novelty in early-modern English caselaw (with Peter Grajzl)

June 4, 2024, 5 p.m.

Ghost Kings

June 4, 2024, 5:15 p.m.

All welcome Refreshments

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Three on the Arun: William Collins, George Smith, Charlotte Smith

June 4, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Title TBC

June 5, 2024, 11 a.m.

Title TBC

June 5, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Opportunities and Challenges of Navigating Fieldwork as Insider and Outsider Fieldworkers

June 5, 2024, 2 p.m.

For some of us, our research projects are situated back home or in locations where we have already spent considerable time. For the rest of us, our field sites could be in locations where we are visiting or living for the first time. Some of us work closely with people in our own communities, whilst others join local communities as external fieldworkers. Depending on our backgrounds, we may navigate fieldwork as "insider" researchers, "outsider" researchers, or both. There may be varying kinds of social norms and local expectations for researchers from different backgrounds. Some of us might start our fieldwork as outsiders, but we may find ourselves no longer entirely outsiders after spending some time in the field, and the ways in which locals consider us may also shift over time. Similarly, insiders may be subject to new expectations from their local communities when returning home for fieldwork after spending some time outside their communities. At this workshop, former fieldworkers will share their experiences in the field, and we will discuss the opportunities and challenges of navigating fieldwork as insiders, outsiders, or both. The workshop is an open space for meeting other fieldworkers and discussing various fieldwork-related topics, including but not limited to tips and strategies to prepare for and navigate fieldwork smoothly. Staff and research students are welcome to join the workshop. Chair Keiko Kanno Panellists Dr Ariell Ahearn (Departmental Lecturer in Human Geography) Dr Bhawani Buswala (Postdoctoral Researcher, PEAK Urban Programme) Anna Sehnalova (DPhil, Anthropology)

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Early-phase neuroplasticity induced by repetitive transcranial ultrasound stimulation in humans

June 5, 2024, 3 p.m.

Oxford Technology & Security Nexus: Multilateral Institutions & AI governance

June 5, 2024, 3 p.m.

This week, Sam Daws will be speaking about multilateral institutions and AI, as well as the current UN negotiations on AI governance. About the speaker Sam Daws works on the interface of multilateral policy, diplomatic strategy, and geopolitics, with a focus on AI governance. He has worked in UN-related policy roles for over three decades. From 2000 to 2003 he served as First Officer to UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan in New York. He later served as Deputy Director in the UK Cabinet Office supporting the Prime Minister’s role as Co-Chair of the UN Panel on the creation of the Sustainable Development Goals. His previous roles included Senior Principal Research Analyst in the Multilateral Policy Directorate of the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Executive Director of the United Nations Association of the UK, and UK Representative of the United Nations Foundation. In his early career he worked in India at a hospice in Calcutta (Kolkata) and a renewable energy project in Ladakh, and later for the Quaker UN Office in Geneva at the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall. He also served as a Parliamentary researcher for the incoming Chair of the House of Commons Defence Select Committee, and as the inaugural head of UNA-UK’s UN and Conflict programme. Sam is a Senior Practitioner Associate in the Department of Politics and International Relations, with an interest in all aspects of UN research and policy. He has served as policy lead and Senior Advisor to Oxford University’s collaboration with the UN’s Academic Impact initiative, and has directed a UN Governance and Reform project for over ten years. He recently also served as Special Advisor to the Rector of the United Nations University, and as an Associate Fellow in the International Law Programme of Chatham House (The Royal Institute of International Affairs). He has written or co-edited 14 books on the UN including The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations (OUP, 2007 and 2nd edn. 2018) and The Procedure of the UN Security Council (OUP, 1998 and 4th edn. 2014). His current policy focus is on the international governance of Artificial Intelligence. He is Senior Advisor to the start-up DiploAI, and the founding director of the diplomacy policy network, mulltilateral.ai. He has also served as strategic advisor on AI governance to the Simon Institute for Longterm Governance in Geneva. Sam has served as an advisor to a variety of governments, international foundations and UN bodies including the office of four successive UN Secretaries-General. He designed the inaugural digital training on the UN for the FCO’s Diplomatic Academy, and has trained diplomats from a range of countries on how to navigate the politics and processes of the UN. He is a visiting lecturer on the international staff course of the Royal College of Defence Studies in London, on the MSc in International Strategy and Diplomacy at the LSE, and on the Oxford University Diplomatic Studies Programme. He has also taught courses on the UN and international negotiation for visiting students at St Catherine’s College, Oxford, and has served for ten years as a Sector Consultant (industry advisor - IOs and public policy) to Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. Sam has a degree in social anthropology with African and Asian development studies, and a Masters in international conflict analysis. He studied for a DPhil at New College, Oxford in international relations (on UN Security Council reform) but left for New York before completing his doctorate to work for the UN Secretary-General. He later spent a year at the University of Cambridge as a Visiting Fellow in International Law and was a visiting fellow at Yale University in UN studies. He has undertaken executive courses in international negotiation at the Centre d'études pratiques de la négociation internationale in Geneva; in environment and human security at the UNU leadership academy in Amman, Jordan; and in economics for foreign policy at the LSE. He is Director of the advisory firm 3D Strategy Ltd. He has a postgraduate qualification from Cass Business School in Grantmaking, Philanthropy and Social Investment. In 2009 he completed the one-year executive leadership and management programme (TMP 91) of the National School of Government, sponsored by the Cabinet Office. He previously studied Foundation and Endowment Asset Management at London Business School. He is completing the AI Programme at Oxford's Saïd Business School. Sam has been a non-executive director on the Boards of the Academic Council on the UN System and the World Federation of UN Associations, He was trust secretary to the UNA-UK charitable trust and a trustee of the Gilbert Murray Trust. He founded and convened the UN working group of the British International Studies Association, and served on BISA’s national executive committee.

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Neil Jones: Passing it on

June 5, 2024, 5 p.m.

This isn’t brain surgery - it’s much more delicate! Using the world’s most powerful microscopes and stitches finer than a human hair, microsurgeons are now able to reconnect the smallest blood vessels and nerves in the body - saving lives and limbs and restoring quality of life to millions. Trinity alumnus Professor Neil Jones is a distinguished leader in this field and will discuss how microsurgery has revolutionised reconstructive surgery in a variety of settings. He will also share with us his experience of over thirty years of “passing it on” through performing and teaching humanitarian reconstructive surgery in some of the least developed countries in the world.

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Parades and Power in Seventeenth-Eighteenth Century Japan: The Daimyo of Satsuma’s visits to a village of captured Korean potters within his domain

June 5, 2024, 5 p.m.

Skilled worker visas for refugees – a qualitative evaluation of the UK’s Displaced Talent Mobility Pilot

June 5, 2024, 5 p.m.

For details see https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/skilled-worker-visas-for-refugees--a-qualitative-evaluation-of-the-uks-displaced-talent-mobility-pilot

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The Fall of Kabul: Why It Happened and Why It Matters?

June 5, 2024, 5 p.m.

The transformative role of Somascan for protein biomarker discovery, validation and translation

June 6, 2024, noon

Somalogic aims to transform research and healthcare with industry-leading proteomics. Their pioneering platform provides more coverage of the proteome than any other than any other technology.

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Replication fork plasticity and its emerging role during physiological and malignant haematopoiesis

June 6, 2024, noon

Medical Grand Rounds - Week 9: Geriatrics

June 6, 2024, 1 p.m.

Lesson of the week, clinical cases and research. All clinical and academic staff and students welcome. Coffee, Tea and Cake will be served.

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Title TBC

June 6, 2024, 1 p.m.

Title TBC

June 6, 2024, 2 p.m.

Eclipse Prediction in Late Fifteenth-century England: the Case of Lewis Caerleon

June 6, 2024, 2 p.m.

Migration Governance in the Mediterranean Region: Setting a New Agenda?

June 6, 2024, 3:45 p.m.

Panel discussion

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As if Heaven is Speaking: Astrology and the Discourse of Legitimacy in Early Medieval China

June 6, 2024, 5 p.m.

John Colley, University of Cambridge, Early Christianity, Confessionalization, and the Translation of Greek in Mid-Tudor England

June 6, 2024, 5 p.m.

Religion in Britain and Ireland, 1400-1700 Seminar series on Thursdays at 5pm, Trinity Term 2024 in the Lecture Room at Campion Hall John Colley, University of Cambridge Early Christianity, Confessionalization, and the Translation of Greek in Mid-Tudor England Convened by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Judith Maltby, Sarah Mortimer and Grant Tapsell Offered by the Faculties of History and Theology and Religion. Drinks will be served after the seminar on 25 April and 13 June. For more information, or for the Teams link to join remotely, please contact sarah.apetrei@campion.ox.ac.uk.

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Ethics in AI Annual Lecture with Professor Joshua Cohen

June 6, 2024, 5 p.m.

The Annual Hicks Lecture 2024 - Prof. Isaiah Andrews

June 6, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

The Oxford Department of Economics is pleased to host the Annual Hicks Lecture 2024, delivered by Professor Isaiah Andrews (Professor of Economics at MIT and Harvard. Recipient of the John Bates Clark Medal, and MacArthur Fellow). The event will take place at 17:30 - 18:30 on 6th June 2024 and will be followed by a drinks reception for in-person attendees. Lecture title: 'True and Pseudo-True Parameter Values' About the lecture: Parameter estimates in misspecified models often converge to pseudo-true parameter values, which minimize a population objective function. Pseudo-true values often differ from quantities of economic interest, raising questions of how, if at all, they are relevant for decision-making. To study this question we consider Bayesian decision-makers facing a population minimum distance problem. Within a class of priors motivated by the minimum distance objective, we characterize prior sequences under which posteriors concentrate on the pseudo-true value. This convergence is fragile to small changes in priors, implying that pseudo-true values are relevant for decision-making only in special cases. Constructive results are nevertheless possible in this setting, and we derive simple confidence intervals that guarantee correct average coverage for the true parameter under every prior in the class we study, with no bound on the magnitude of misspecification. About the speaker: Isaiah Andrews is a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. A research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, Andrews is also a co-editor of the American Economic Review. In 2018, The Economist named him one of the 8 "best young economists of the decade." He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2020 for his work on statistical inference. In 2021, the American Economic Association awarded him the John Bates Clark Medal - an award given annually to an American economist under age 40 “who is judged to have made the most significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge.”

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Surgical Grand Rounds

June 7, 2024, 8 a.m.

Coffee, tea and pastries will be served in the Lecture Theatre. Please email Louise King (louise.king@nds.ox.ac.uk) if you would like to attend online.

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Oxford Cancer Immuno-Oncology Network 2024 Annual Symposium

June 7, 2024, 8:30 a.m.

Title TBC

June 7, 2024, 9:15 a.m.

Storytelling for researchers

June 7, 2024, 11 a.m.

Dr Catherine Seed will present on storytelling for researchers (as key to writing manuscripts and other pieces of work). The session will include a short Q&A. To join the session, please "click here":https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_MGQ5NThjNjQtNzM4ZS00ZmE0LWFmMTctMzY4MDZmZGEzYzVj%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22cc95de1b-97f5-4f93-b4ba-fe68b852cf91%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22f6215955-7b24-48ec-a76a-2933147ca7b5%22%7d. Each PoPoH session covers: * a brief overview of career and training support available to postdocs and other research staff across the University * a 30-minute lecture by an expert on the session’s theme * a new project management tip each month * a Career Chat where a Careers Adviser for Research Staff will address careers concerns and questions * ideas for simple things you can do now for your career and work/life balance

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Preparing for the academic interview process

June 7, 2024, 1 p.m.

Do you want to brush up on the practicalities of preparing for interviews and presentations? This online session is designed for University research staff and DPhil students applying for academic positions. We will discuss and practice the skills required for effective performance at interview; preparation, self-presentation and how to identify and deal with typical interview questions. Whilst focusing on early postdoctoral positions, we will also cover questions typically focused for 'the lectureship leap' and mid-level positions. The workshop will focus on academic interviews. Follow up one-to-one career discussions can then be used to review intended applications and to prepare for particular interviews, included conducting mock interviews. All DPhil students and research staff welcome. This session will focus on academic applications only

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Intersecting Identities: Race and Queerness in South African Cinema

June 7, 2024, 1 p.m.

Race & Resistance is pleased to welcome Dr. Gibson Ncube as our final speaker for our 2023/24 events programme. Dr. Ncube is currently an AfOx TORCH Visiting Fellow at Oxford. The session will be focusing on questions of race and queerness in South African films, as Dr. Ncube will be speaking to us about a chapter from his last book, Queer Bodies in African Films. After this, the session will open to a Q&A, so come prepared with some questions. The facilitator for this session is one of our students, Mwangi Mwaura (he/him). Biography: Gibson Ncube (he/him) holds a PhD from Stellenbosch University and currently lectures at the same university. He has published extensively in the fields of comparative African literature, gender and queer studies as well as cultural studies. He has held several fellowships supported by institutions like the American Council for Learned Societies, the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, the National Humanities Center (USA) and Leeds University. He sits on the boards of the Journal of Literary Studies, Imbizo: International Journal of African Literary and Comparative Studies, the Canadian Journal of African Studies, the Nordic Journal of African Studies as well as the Governing Intimacies in the Global South book series at Manchester University Press. He co-convened the Queer African Studies Association (coordinate organisation of the African Studies Association, USA) and was the 2021 Mary Kingsley Zochonis Distinguished Lecturer (African Studies Association UK & Royal African Society). —-------------------- Twitter: race_resistance Subscribe to our mailing list by sending a blank email to: race-and-resistance-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk. Email raceandresistance@torch.ox.ac.uk with any questions.

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Title TBC

June 7, 2024, 1:15 p.m.

Modeling the electromechanics of aerial electroreception

June 7, 2024, 2 p.m.

Aerial electroreception is the ability of some arthropods (e.g., bees) to detect electric fields in the environment. I present an overview of our attempts to model the electromechanics of this recently discovered phenomenon and how it might contribute to the sensory biology of arthropods. This is joint work with Daniel Robert and Ryan Palmer.

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Title TBC

June 7, 2024, 2 p.m.

Title TBC

June 7, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

Testing Inequalities Linear in Nuisance Parameters

June 7, 2024, 2:15 p.m.

This paper proposes a new test for inequalities linear in possibly partially identified nuisance parameters, called the generalized conditional chi-squared (GCC) test. It extends the subvector conditional chi-squared (sCC) test in Cox and Shi (2023, CS23) to a setting where the nuisance parameter is pre-multiplied by an unknown and estimable matrix of coefficients. Properly accounting for the estimation noise in this matrix while maintaining the simplicity of the sCC test is the main innovation of this paper. As such, the paper provides a simple solution to a broad set of problems including subvector inference for models represented by linear programs, nonparametric instrumental variable models with discrete regressor and instruments, and linear unconditional moment inequality models. We also derive a simplified formula for computing the critical value that makes the computation of the GCC test elementary.

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‘Adventrous Eve’: before and after Milton

June 7, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Anna Beer is the biographer of many major literary figures such as John Milton and William Shakespeare, but she is best-known for her feisty, feminist and accessible accounts of female creatives, including most recently Eve Bites Back: An Alternative History of English Literature. Her most influential book has been Sounds and Sweet Airs: The Forgotten Women of Classical Music (2016), which has generated numerous creative collaborations from film to live performance. Anna has held various positions at the University of Oxford, including Director of the Creative Writing MSt, and remains a Visiting Fellow at Kellogg College.

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The McDonald Centre 2024 Annual Conference - The Public Legitimacy of the Church of England.

June 10, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

The McDonald Centre 2024 Annual Conference - The Public Legitimacy of the Church of England. The McDonald Centre 2024 Annual Conference - The Public Legitimacy of the Church of England. Pusey House: Chapel, Oxford, OX1 3LZ Mon 10th June 2024 9:30AM Within our contemporary moment, the public legitimacy of the Church of England in England’s life and in the United Kingdom’s constitution and political life is being newly explored and questioned, inspiring multiple and complex responses. The recent death of HM Queen Elizabeth II and Coronation of Charles III in May 2023 have brought to the surface some aspects of these concerns. Presented by The McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics and Public Life in partnership with the Centre for Cultural Witness based at Lambeth Palace, and hosted at Pusey House, Oxford the Conference brings together an exciting array of speakers from a variety of backgrounds to bring their insights to bear on the past and future of the establishment of the Church of England. The conference brings a focused set of contemporary questions about loyalty, mission, place, ecumenism and inter-faith relations, into conversation with the theology, political thought and history which lie behind the Church of England’s public role. Confirmed speakers include: Tom Holland, historian and host of the popular podcast The Rest Is History. Eleanor Sanderson, Anglican Bishop of Hull. Andrew Rumsey, Anglican Bishop of Ramsbury. Graham Tomlin, Director of the Centre for Cultural Witness. Jonathan Chaplin, Divinity Faculty member, University of Cambridge, author of Beyond Establishment. Joshua Hordern, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics, University of Oxford. Archbishop Angaelos, Coptic Orthodox Archbishop of London. David Fergusson, Regius Professor of Divinity, University of Cambridge. Daniel Greenberg, Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards. Catherine Pepinster, historian, former editor of The Tablet. Maria Power, Las Casas Institute, Blackfriars Hall John Ritzema, Pusey House Tickets priced at £20 (standard) and £10 (student) include tea, coffee and a sandwich lunch Event Details From 9:30AM to 5:00PM Location Pusey House: Chapel, Oxford, OX1 3LZ

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Wearables in mega-scale biobanks – are there some learnings for rare disease research?

June 10, 2024, 11 a.m.

I will discuss the story behind the collection of wrist-worn accelerometer data in over 150,000 research participants across the UK and China, while also describing efforts to collect complementary open human activity recognition validation datasets to further enhance these resources. I will share the development of machine learning methods for sleep, sedentary behaviour, physical activity behaviours and steps, referring to open software tools and data resources of relevance to others in the field, and hopefully beyond to identify opportunities for collaboration with rare disease researchers.

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New insights into smooth muscle peacemaking

June 10, 2024, noon

The school senior leader workforce: preliminary results from analyses of demographic composition, leadership progression and turnover.

June 10, 2024, 12:45 p.m.

The sustainability of the school leadership workforce is an increasing concern for researchers, policy makers and school leaders themselves. In this seminar I will present early findings from the secondary data strand of an ESRC-funded comparative study of sustainable school leadership across the UK seeking to understand how the UK nations recruit, train and retain school leaders. The focus will be emerging findings from analysis of the School Workforce Census data in England (2010 to 2022). I will provide an overview of the demographic composition of the senior school leader workforce, the changing role and circumstances of headship, and how these vary by context, location and over time. I will also provide preliminary results of analyses of senior school leader turnover and career progression, exploring how these have changed over the period and the personal, structural and geographical factors associated with each. The results will be discussed in connection with emerging findings from the wider mixed methods research project, outlining the key themes, issues and policy priorities for strengthening and sustaining the senior school leader workforce. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81676896885?pwd=aHh0b0J0aDh0eEZUZVc3R1ZJaG5Kdz09

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Tools for early, rapid and accurate diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis that could improve case ascertainment in resource limited settings

June 10, 2024, 1 p.m.

Victorian Women and Algology: The Case of Margaret Scott Gatty (1809–1873)

June 10, 2024, 4 p.m.

Seaweed collecting was one of the natural history ‘crazes’ of the nineteenth century. Many of the seaweed collectors were women from various social backgrounds whose observational skills and expertise were useful to male naturalists. From Mary Elizabeth Barber (1818–1899), who corresponded with William Henry Harvey (1811–1866) and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817–1911) and sent them South African specimens of plants, to Amelia Griffiths (1768–1858), Isabella Gifford (1825–1891), Margaret Scott Gatty (1809–1873) and her daughter, Horatia Katherine Frances Gatty (1846–1945), who shared their knowledge and discoveries with William Henry Harvey, George James Allman (1812–1898) and George Forbes (1849–1936), these female algologists’ collections have often disappeared or been scattered due to lack of scientific recognition, while their scientific contributions are still overlooked by historians of science. This paper will focus on the case of Margaret Gatty, best-selling populariser of science, as illustrated by her British Sea-Weeds (1863), and famous children’s writer, and examine the Victorian woman’s presentation of her scientific activities as well as her construction of a scientific self. *Laurence Talairach* is a Professor of Victorian Literature at the University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès and an associate researcher at the Alexandre-Koyré Center for the History of Science and Technology (Paris). Her academic interests span medicine, natural history and British literature in the long nineteenth century. Her current research aims to map out the forms of natural historical knowledge produced by British women in the nineteenth century and examine the complexity of the relationship between scientific knowledge and popular representations, the construction of a learned/scientific female identity, the relationship of women naturalists to scientific expertise, and their place in the field of scientific knowledge.

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Title TBC

June 10, 2024, 4:05 p.m.

The Late-Ming "Mine Tax" Reconsidered

June 10, 2024, 5 p.m.

No episode in the annals of Ming monarchical overreach has a more notorious reputation than the ‘Mine Tax’ crisis (1596-1606), when the Wanli emperor (r. 1572-1620) ordered palace eunuchs to lead the ‘opening of mines’ for silver and other metals across the empire. The result was a decade of little mining and much extortion of bullion, as well as intense bureaucratic and public resistance. But the Mine Tax involved more than one monarch’s idiosyncratic bullion grab and a righteous Confucian backlash. Drawing on a host of contemporary sources, my talk surveys the late-Ming context to the Tax’s inception, early-Qing responses to the Mine Tax, and reflections on the Tax in Qing statecraft literature, arguing that the Tax sheds light on a sustained late-Ming and early-Qing debate about bullion, trade, monarchical authority, and tax form, with parallels across early-modern Eurasia and implications for Chinese political economy well beyond the seventeenth century.

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Title TBC

June 11, 2024, 9:30 a.m.

Sleep for synaptic functions

June 11, 2024, noon

Child & Adolescent Mental Health Seminar Series: 'Case Presentation: Treating ARFID isn’t scary. We can all do it!

June 11, 2024, 12:15 p.m.

No CSAE Workshop this week

June 11, 2024, 1 p.m.

Juggling a "parallel welfare system": local government responses to migrants' locked out of the welfare safety net

June 11, 2024, 2 p.m.

Over two million people in the UK are impacted by the ‘No Recourse to Public Funds’ (NRPF) policy, an immigration policy restricting access to the mainstream social security and welfare system. Many people impacted by this policy are long-term UK residents who have regularised their status and are locked out of the welfare safety net, with limited avenues for support. Whilst the NRPF policy excludes many migrants from the welfare safety net, local government have been described as providing a "parallel welfare system" (Price & Spencer, 2015) funded by local rather than central government for vulnerable destitute migrants, locked out of the mainstream welfare safety net in the UK. Drawing on a mixed methods study including fieldwork with local government, NGOs and people with lived experience of the NRPF policy, this paper will present findings on local government approaches to providing a “parallel welfare system” for vulnerable, destitute migrants, including supporting them to regularise their status, and will unpack how this system is justified, administered, and how it could be improved. Zoom link: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAkf--trDgoG9XRsWVJzXOeZf2ZRDMRTLxu

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Open scholarship: logistics of open scholarship

June 11, 2024, 2:30 p.m.

The second in a duo of courses (attendees should attend the Fundamentals course prior to Logistics) that will cover the logistics of researching, publishing, and locating open scholarship resources and tools at the University of Oxford. Subjects include: what is the Oxford University Research Archive; depositing work into ORA via Symplectic Elements; depositing data into ORA-data; applying for one of Oxford’s APC block grants; registering or connecting your ORCID; how to be included in the rights retention pilot; and locating and checking funder policies. Ideally the 'Fundamentals of Open Access' course will have been attended. If you’re not in a position to attend this course you can find similar information in our e-learning package to work through prior to attending Logistics. Intended audience: Oxford students, researchers and other staff.

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Natural language processing of multi-hospital electronic health records for public health surveillance of suicidality

June 11, 2024, 4 p.m.

There is an urgent need to monitor the mental health of large populations, especially during crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, to timely identify the most at-risk subgroups and to design targeted prevention campaigns. We therefore developed and validated surveillance indicators related to suicidality: the monthly number of hospitalisations caused by suicide attempts and the prevalence among them of five known risks factors. They were automatically computed analysing the electronic health records of fifteen university hospitals of the Paris area, France, using natural language processing algorithms based on artificial intelligence. We evaluated the relevance of these indicators conducting a retrospective cohort study. Considering 2,911,920 records contained in a common data warehouse, we tested for changes after the pandemic outbreak in the slope of the monthly number of suicide attempts by conducting an interrupted time-series analysis. We segmented the assessment time in two sub-periods: before (August 1, 2017, to February 29, 2020) and during (March 1, 2020, to June 31, 2022) the COVID-19 pandemic. We detected 14,023 hospitalisations caused by suicide attempts. Their monthly number accelerated after the COVID-19 outbreak with an estimated trend variation reaching 3.7 (95%CI 2.1–5.3), mainly driven by an increase among girls aged 8–17 (trend variation 1.8, 95%CI 1.2–2.5). After the pandemic outbreak, acts of domestic, physical and sexual violence were more often reported (prevalence ratios: 1.3, 95%CI 1.16–1.48; 1.3, 95%CI 1.10–1.64 and 1.7, 95%CI 1.48–1.98), fewer patients died (p = 0.007) and stays were shorter (p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that textual clinical data collected in multiple hospitals can be jointly analysed to compute timely indicators describing mental health conditions of populations. Our findings also highlight the need to better take into account the violence imposed on women, especially at early ages and in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Managing Algorithm Development among Third Party Contractors

June 11, 2024, 4 p.m.

The use of autonomous machine learning-based pricing algorithms has grown in many markets in recent years, and many firms outsource their pricing algorithms to third party developers. Recent evidence highlights the potential for pricing algorithms to soften competition, but the role of third-party developers, and how the risks of these algorithms can be managed, are less clear. Using a randomized experiment on a large online platform, we investigate the extent to which third party programmers consider downstream effects of widespread adoption of their algorithms when designing them, and whether managers outsourcing pricing algorithms can influence programmer decisions and designs. Our findings have implications for pricing algorithm development and regulation, and for managing third party programmers.

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Courtly Marriage

June 11, 2024, 4:15 p.m.

*Hanna Sinclair* (University of Oxford) 'Unity and Disunity at the Marriage Banquets of Maria de’ Medici and Henri IV' *Max Diemer* (University of Oxford) 'The Habsburg bedroom versus the Bourbon study: Exerting family influence over the Duchy of Parma from Vienna and Versailles (1750-1780)'

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Still Chasing the Xiezhai: Mythology and Visual Representations of Justice in Chinese History

June 11, 2024, 5 p.m.

Disagreeing on Ethical Questions, Fruitfully and Otherwise

June 11, 2024, 5 p.m.

Description: The event is inspired by the new Wellcome-funded Antitheses Platform for Transformative Inclusivity in Ethics and Humanities. “Disagreeing on ethical questions is an important part of philosophical ethics, whether at the level of metaethics, normative theory, or applied ethics. I shall look back over some of the disagreements I have had on ethical questions at each of these levels, and reflect on which kinds of disagreements have been fruitful, and which have not” Peter Singer Speaker: Peter Singer is one of the most influential, but also controversial philosophers of the last century, widely known for his work in the areas of animal ethics (Animal Liberation, 1975, last edition 2023 ), the ethics of charitable giving (The Life You Can Save, 2009 ), and practical ethics more generally (Practical Ethics 1979, last edition 2011). Disagreement has been a constant feature of his career both at the level of theoretical investigation and in his own personal experience.

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How many jobs? Division of labour in early modern England and Wales (with David Chilosi, Giampaolo Lecce)

June 11, 2024, 5 p.m.

Oxford Energy Seminar Series – Week 8 TT24: Bristol City Leap: A novel finance and procurement model for delivering net zero

June 11, 2024, 5 p.m.

Public financing alone is insufficient for delivering net zero – private finance must also be secured to deliver decarbonisation at scale and pace. This seminar delves into the innovative procurement approach underpinning Bristol City Leap, an innovative procurement model introduced by Bristol City Council which addresses the urgency of decarbonization through a unique public-private partnership on a city-wide scale. With a particular focus on exploring the risks and opportunities involved in procuring such large-scale city infrastructure investment programmes through public-private partnerships, it will examine the complexities through a range of disciplines, including public policy, law, geography, economics, and business.

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Early Modern Literature Graduate Forum social

June 11, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Hands-on History: Gaming Peripherals Past and Present

June 11, 2024, 5:30 p.m.

Have you ever wished that you could put down your controller and experience video games in a whole new way? At this event we take you into the world of gaming peripherals: whether you’re making your next masterpiece in Mario Paint with the SNES mouse or rocking out on Guitar Hero with the guitar controllers, these gaming peripherals add a novel layer of immersion, and a different way to interact with the screen in front of you. Hands-on History: Gaming Peripherals Past and Present is an interactive and historical adventure through the past 50 years of gaming from the 1980s to today. Expect to experience block stacking with R.O.B the Robot, musical jams with Donkey Konga, a real Mario Kart circuit with remote control karts, and much more! The event also includes a panel of industry professionals, and an introduction from Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt FRS. This event is supported by JoyPad. To find out more visit www.joypadbar.co.uk Snacks and refreshments will be provided. We look forward to welcoming you to an evening of gaming, history, and pure nostalgia! Suitable for ages 12+

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Title TBC

June 12, 2024, 11 a.m.

CHG Lunchtime Lab Talks: Professor Christopher Buckley (Kennedy), CHG Group TBC

June 12, 2024, 12:30 p.m.

Buckley Group - Kennedy Institute (12:30-13:00) Speaker: Professor Christopher Buckley Title: A therapeutic cell atlas to study Immune Mediated Inflammatory Diseases. Abstract: Unlike haematological diseases where the gene (haemoglobin), cell (red blood cell) and clinical features (anaemia) map well onto each other, the cellular basis for most inflammatory diseases remains enigmatic. The Human Cell Atlas (HCA) [1] was established to construct a map of the different cell types involved in forming human organs using single cell analysis with spatial analysis to locate their position in tissue. Using the principles of the HCA in an Arthritis Therapy Acceleration Programme (A-TAP) we have assessed how the cellular composition of tissue is affected following treatment with biologics such as anti TNF across a range of IMIDs including RA and IBD [2]. This therapeutic cell atlas can be used to instr